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By Mary O’Keefe | July 12, 2009
LA CAÑADA — The mission of the spacecraft Ulysses, which studied the far-flung polar regions of the sun, has come to an end after 18 years of exploration — far outlasting its original life expectancy. The spacecraft was a joint mission between Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA and European Space Agency. Throughout its long mission it entered unexplored regions of the solar system, gathering information about the sun and its environment. “We lasted almost four times longer than planned and a year longer than we thought we would,” said Ed Massey, Ulysses NASA/JPL project manager.
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By CARL RAGGIO | October 30, 2007
Does anyone remember Oct. 4, 1957? Or is it just another day lost in memory? It was the day the Russians flew Sputnik — man’s first successful positioning of an artificial satellite in orbit — around Earth. It has been 50 years since this event, and it was that special day that ushered in “The Space Age.” On Oct. 4, 2007, the Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne Space Center — in Lausanne, Switzerland, and under the directorship of Dr. Maurice Borgeaud — commemorated the 50th anniversary of Sputnik’s flight.
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By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | December 10, 2011
A $50-million budget cut for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge likely won't be enough to spur another round of mass layoffs, a legislative affairs official for the agency said. Despite massive federal deficits that have put support for space exploration and other science programs in jeopardy, JPL's budget will remain relatively stable at $1.5 billion for the coming year. Even with the $50-million hit, the venerable laboratory will likely be able to avoid “another large change in workforce,” said Richard O'Toole, manager of legislative affairs.
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By Tracey Laity | May 20, 2006
LA CA—ADA FLINTRIDGE ? Residents will be able to explore cutting-edge space exploration technology at Jet Propulsion Laboratory's annual Open House event this weekend, organizers promise. More than 40,000 people are expected to check out some of the laboratory's high-tech testing sites, interact with robots and touch samples brought back from outer space, JPL spokeswoman Kim Lievense said. During this year's event, the micro-device laboratory will be open for the first time as will the mobility and robotic systems area and the "Robodome," which features three rovers named Fido, Rocky VIII and Pluto, the formal flight test facility and the spacecraft assembly facility, which has been closed for the previous two years, she said.
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By Tracey Laity | March 11, 2006
LA CA—ADA FLINTRIDGE ? After nearly 30 minutes of nail-biting silence, staff at Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mission Control erupted into whoops and hollers of joy as the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter came back into radio contact on Friday afternoon. As the spacecraft, one of the largest and most technologically advanced ever to be sent to Mars, briefly disappeared behind the red planet and fell out of radio contact with Earth at 1:46 p.m., the future of the $720-million mission literally hung in the balance.
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By Scott Gold and By Scott Gold | September 19, 2013
The most high-fidelity search for methane on Mars has turned up none, a result that significantly reduces the chances of finding microbial life on the Red Planet. The highly awaited results of tests conducted by NASA's Curiosity rover do not completely rule out the possibility that something is alive on Mars, researchers said. But the findings, published online Thursday by the journal Science, strongly suggest that Mars is barren. “We're very confident in this result,” said study leader Christopher R. Webster, who oversees the development of planetary science instruments at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge.
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By Mary O’Keefe | July 12, 2009
LA CAÑADA — The mission of the spacecraft Ulysses, which studied the far-flung polar regions of the sun, has come to an end after 18 years of exploration — far outlasting its original life expectancy. The spacecraft was a joint mission between Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA and European Space Agency. Throughout its long mission it entered unexplored regions of the solar system, gathering information about the sun and its environment. “We lasted almost four times longer than planned and a year longer than we thought we would,” said Ed Massey, Ulysses NASA/JPL project manager.
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By CARL RAGGIO | October 30, 2007
Does anyone remember Oct. 4, 1957? Or is it just another day lost in memory? It was the day the Russians flew Sputnik — man’s first successful positioning of an artificial satellite in orbit — around Earth. It has been 50 years since this event, and it was that special day that ushered in “The Space Age.” On Oct. 4, 2007, the Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne Space Center — in Lausanne, Switzerland, and under the directorship of Dr. Maurice Borgeaud — commemorated the 50th anniversary of Sputnik’s flight.
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