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NEWS
October 29, 2012
Every week last summer in Armenia, I walked up the street named after a celebrated Russian author to my local grocer. It was always a hot day, and the grocer was always dressed in a cut-off T-shirt, sometimes hauling in fruit, sometimes dangling a cigarette in this mouth, but always ready for a chat. If my appearance didn't give away the fact that I wasn't a local, my accent certainly did. Maybe that made talking to me more intriguing, but between laundry detergent and the best apricots I have ever tasted, he would ask about where I came from, and what I thought about living in Yerevan as he totaled up my bill.
NEWS
July 16, 2005
Joyce Rudolph Chelsea Williams has high hopes for landing a record deal and becoming known all over the world. It's her dream. But for now, the 19-year-old Sunland singer/songwriter is enjoying success in her own backyard as one of several acts appearing in the Glendale Marketplace Summer Music Series. Williams, who accompanies herself on acoustic guitar, has more than 80 original songs in her repertoire. And she wrote them in a little over six years, she said.
NEWS
March 20, 2004
Glendale Unified School District board members have been criticized recently for becoming emotional when being addressed by the public. One recent letter-writer went so far as to suggest that a board member's shedding of tears revealed a personality that was not "emotionally strong" enough to handle the issues facing the board. The writer's got it backward. Emotionally strong people are the ones not ashamed to show their feelings when appropriate, the ones who suffer no embarrassment from them, the ones who are comfortable being human.
NEWS
January 3, 2005
Jackson Bell As Arlene Roach witnessed the small blaze outside her church, she released the memory of a painful relationship last year to make room a better new year. Roach participated in the annual Burning Bowl Ceremony on Sunday morning at her church, the Glendale Church of Religious Science, 2146 E. Chevy Chase Drive. The ceremony, conducted each of the past 10 years, allowed churchgoers to write down their unwanted feelings from 2004 on a small piece of paper, place it in one of two "burning bowls" in the church's foyer and watch it go up in smoke.
NEWS
September 20, 2001
The Glendale Human Relations Coalition denounces the abhorrent attacks perpetrated on innocent people and our entire country on Sept. 11, 2001. We are proud to learn all segments of our community, regardless of their ethnic, cultural, religious and other backgrounds, have risen united as one voice to condemn these actions and to help the victims in any way they can. In these trying and stressful times, feelings of anger and retaliation are common and people often look for ways to express those feelings.
NEWS
September 6, 2001
Just when we thought the Armenian Genocide flag lowering issue was finally over, here it comes again! I fully understand that many people have strong feelings regarding this issue. Although these strong feelings and opinions are fully justified, it is now time to realize that all sides have been expressed and that any more attempts to continue the issue are only detrimental to everybody involved. As a city composed of many different ethnic, economic and social backgrounds, we must realize that we are continuing (not to mention adding to)
NEWS
August 1, 2003
"On the whole, God's love for us is a much safer subject to think about than our love for him. Nobody can always have devout feelings; and even if we could, feelings are not what God principally cares about. Christian love, either toward God or toward man, is an affair of the will. But the great thing to remember is that, though our feelings come and go, his love for us does not." C.S. Lewis Apparently, it is time for another change in my life. This time it's as minor as a new address for my P.O. Box, and you can find it at the end of the column.
NEWS
December 16, 2003
Darleene Barrientos The holidays are known for happiness and joy, but for some, it is the loneliest time of the year. With pressure building to buy the perfect gift with little money or cope with grief over the loss of a loved one during the holidays, people easily succumb to feelings of sadness or depression. Anxious calls for help increase during the holidays, but the trick is to watch and know yourself, said Janet Richardson, the senior chaplain at Glendale Adventist Medical Center.
NEWS
July 20, 2000
I was disturbed by James Brackett's letter (July 18) on the plight of the homeless, not because I harbor antipathy toward the homeless, but because of his unenlightening railing again those who do. As I see it, compassion for the homeless is based upon empathy, which requires the ability to imagine what it would be like to be in their shoes. But I would also like to see empathy for those who are unsympathetic toward the homeless. Without this kind of understanding, we are left only with the sort of invective that permeates Brackett's column.
NEWS
December 23, 2000
In my letter published Dec. 15, it states "my country -- Turkey." I never made that statement. If my heritage were Turkish or Armenian, I would not be ashamed of it, however I was born in Wisconsin of Swedish and Irish parents. I read the News-Press daily, practically every word and am simply tired of the Genocide wailings. I lost three close family members in World War II and have a younger brother permanently disabled from his wounds in Korea.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 2, 2014
On a typical morning at the beginning of this school year, a bus known as "Bus 106" carrying dozens of students to Clark Magnet High School from Glendale was late to school again. So, Barbara Melone, then senior administrative secretary at the school, made an announcement she had grown used to making, often in her disgruntled, irritated or sarcastic tone. "Bus 106 has just arrived," she told the entire student body over the school's intercom. Then, only to her colleagues in the school's front office, she joked, "I'm going to put 'Bus 106 has just arrived' on my tombstone.
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NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | April 2, 2014
I am sitting on a gray, velvet, diamond-tufted couch in a top-floor apartment that overlooks Los Angeles. The view is breathtaking. There are hookah pipes strewn around on tables outside and a Mariah Carey song is the background music of the day. But I'm not here to talk about organizing parties or how “Always Be My Baby” is Carey's best song ever (you can argue this point with me later.) I'm here to talk about something a little less appropriate when it comes to polite conversation, something taboo, something there's no good word for when you're trying to explain what it is you're actually talking about.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | December 23, 2013
Six-year-old Camilla Lopez timidly walked along a table topped with dozens of dolls - soon one would be hers if she could just find the right one. She finally settled on a girly doll resembling a baby and gently placed it in a black plastic bag. The doll was just one of several toys that she and her two sisters received Saturday from deputies at the Crescenta Valley Sheriff's Station, where the holiday spirit was in full swing. “They are doing good for the kids,” said Camilla's father, Oscar Lopez of Tujunga.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Dupuy | November 5, 2013
Everyone has their favorite Thai takeout place. Where I live, I typically do Min's Kitchen or Woodlands Cafe. But if I lived near Kozy Korner, I'd be going there regularly. It's for people who, like me, enjoy strong Thai flavors - lemon grass, lime, chili peppers, basil, galanga, fish sauce. I'm getting hungry just thinking about it. Kozy Korner is as tiny as it sounds. However, once you're seated at one of the 10 or so tables it's not an issue. A group of Thai women keep the restaurant humming, boxing up to-go orders, delivering steaming plates with lightning speed and all while avoiding collisions with an impressive sixth sense.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | September 5, 2013
Sometimes when friends and I are feeling nostalgic, we'll recount our earlier days together, particularly when we were first introduced to the Internet, that wonderful tool that changed everyone's lives forever. "Remember when you had to disconnect your phone to sign on?" we'll say between belly laughs. "And that awful, piercing connection signal that came just before the famous 'You've Got Mail!' proclamation by AOL?" As a preteen, there were few things more exciting than being able to chat with your friends with user names that reflected the now cringe-worthy pop culture of the time (our poison of choice was "Titanic" and all the characters that came along with it)
SPORTS
By Andrew J. Campa, andrew.campa@latimes.com | August 29, 2013
GLENDALE - Is it possible to have both a team that's brand new and yet experienced? It's a question that could be posed to the Glendale Community College men's cross-country team as the squad prepares for its season opener at Saturday morning's Mark Covert Classic at Carbon Canyon in Fullerton. Yet, that's not what the Vaqueros and coach Eddie Lopez are asking themselves this summer. Nope. The thought that surrounds the squad is can they repeat a wildly successful 2012 season that saw the team clinch a Western State Conference championship, finish sixth at the Southern California Championships, only to follow up those performances with a silver-medal effort at the California Community College Cross-Country Championships.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | August 22, 2013
For the first time in 10 years, I got on a bicycle yesterday. It took a good 10 minutes to retrain myself how to ride without falling over, but when I took off, it felt like absolute freedom. The wind hit my face and I stopped pedaling as my downhill speed increased. There were no cars, no distractions, not a sound in the distance except the wheels of my bicycle. It was a moment of peace I wish I could have held onto forever. Of course, it probably helped that I did this in Alaska.
SPORTS
By Grant Gordon, grant.gordon@latimes.com | August 14, 2013
A year from now, if all goes as many are predicting, the St. Francis High football team will be preparing for a schedule featuring a new-look, four-team Mission League. With heavyweights Gardena Serra and Chaminade thought to be moving on, plenty of questions will arise and the Golden Knights' schedule would be mighty different. For now, though, St. Francis is preparing for a 2013 slate that hasn't changed much from the 2012 schedule and will once again be easily the area's most arduous campaign.
SPORTS
By Andrew J. Campa, andrew.campa@latimes.com | July 31, 2013
COMPTON - With his team celebrating behind him a few minutes after clinching a West Zone Tournament Palomino championship, Arroyo Seco 18U baseball Coach Aaron Milam reflected on the differences between 2012 and 2013. Even though in both seasons Milam's Saints clinched West Zone Tournament crowns and earned berths to the Palomino World Series, there are substantial contrasts. “I think the biggest difference is just having experience in getting to the World Series,” Milam said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liana Aghajanian | July 25, 2013
A few weeks ago, I mentioned to a friend I was working on a story about medical marijuana usage among seniors and the challenges they face using it in assisted living facilities for real, debilitating ailments. In turn, she mentioned to me that she was thinking of going to get a recommendation from a doctor to begin using cannabis for debilitating migraine headaches she'd had for some time. I jumped at the chance to accompany her. In the course of my reporting, I had attended cannabis club meetings for seniors in Orange County, driven to Oakland to visit the largest marijuana dispensary in the United States and attended classes with those who were looking to start their own collective, but I hadn't gone to see the process of getting a doctor's referral for myself.
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