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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 3, 2012
Merchants in Montrose are mulling ways to better accommodate a burgeoning demand for their location from production companies who have been flocking to the area for its quaint setting. On Monday, NBC's “Awake” shut down the first block of Honolulu Avenue in the Montrose Shopping Park for much of the day and a commercial shoot could close off a block all day later this month. The easternmost block of Honolulu Avenue, especially, is popular with film shoots because of its high density of small shops and restaurants.
NEWS
By Brian Crosby, brian-crosby.com | July 21, 2011
With my oldest son away on a boy scout camping trip, I've had some one-on-one time with my youngest son. The house has been much quieter this week since no compromises have had to be made between the two brothers in terms of video game playing time and TV show choices. I was able to take my 7-year-old to see the new Winnie the Pooh film, something I couldn't drag my other son to.  Boy, what a surprise that movie is. No foul language, no sexual innuendo, not even a flatulence comment or sound.  An old-fashioned G-rated movie that's imaginative, not boring or condescending.  Oh, and two other unusual aspects to the film:  it's not in 3-D, and it's not computer animated.  How strange this film must appear to young children who have grown up solely on a diet of computerizedanimation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charly Shelton | June 23, 2006
Al Gore's new documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" in limited release around Southern California, is by far one of the best documentaries released in years. The film deals with a slideshow Gore presents on global warming. This has been a passion of the former vice president since the early 1990s, when he wrote his best selling book, "Earth In The Balance." That book was a warning of things to come with the thinning ozone layer and the warming of the Earth. This film takes that warning further, using studies and technology that have scientists agreeing that the Earth is heating up at a more rapid pace because of human involvement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charly Shelton | March 24, 2006
There were two big movies released last week, one of which was amazing, while the other was a classic done poorly. First "V for Vendetta," starring Natalie Portman and Hugo Weaving. Set several years in London's future, a corrupt and all-controlling government is abusing its power over its citizens. They are defenseless except for one voice known only as V. One night, he saves a woman named Evey (Portman) and takes her to see his handiwork of violence when he blows up a government building.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Hsin, maria.hsin@latimes.com | December 9, 2011
A La Crescenta woman is on a mission to solve a mystery involving a man with three last names for each of the three countries he lived in. The inventor, artist, filmmaker, medical student and businessman was born in Russia in 1895, and he would eventually create the Bolex line of cameras. The cameras have been used by professional filmmakers as well as those who simply wanted to document their lives. Jacques Bolsey's desire to bring filmmaking capability to the masses first came to life in 1914 with the Cinegraph-Bol 35mm motion-picture camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 11, 2008
Glendale resident Sevak Ohanian recreates the problems of growing up in an Armenian American family in his new film “My Big Fat Armenian Family” but adds a twist of humor. The film, which will premiere July 12 and 18 at Glendale High School, tells the story of a family of four — a father, mother, son and daughter. The son can’t seem to do anything right in his father’s eyes, and there is a constant air of friction between them. The parents, Robert and Rima, are played by one man, Ajmin Baghramian, Ohanian said.
NEWS
November 24, 2001
Joyce Rudolph, Weekend GLENDALE -- A deluxe, blue-ribbon selection of Three Stooges classics is planned for the fourth annual Alex Film Society's Big Screen Event, said board member Frank Gladstone. Those who can't catch the 2 p.m. matinee, can catch the second show at 8 tonight at Glendale's Alex Theatre. Gladstone, head of training and recruitment at DreamWorks/SKG Animation in Glendale, chose the films along with fellow society members Steve McCoy and Leonard Maltin and Michael Schlesinger, head of the film department at Sony Pictures, which owns the Stooges' film rights.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
The film and television industry in Los Angeles County has lost more than 16,000 jobs since 2004, mostly due to work migrating out of state, a new report revealed. Last year, the entertainment business generated 102,100 jobs in the county, down 14% from its peak of 118,200 jobs in 2004, according to a study released Friday by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. During the same period, L.A.'s share of overall jobs in the motion picture and video category fell to 51% from 60%. (The figures exclude employment in the music and post-production industries.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2005
For all of us who grumble that movies offer up little of value, "Good Night and Good Luck" is here. You may have to hunt for a theater to see it, in spite of the film grossing a staggering $38,000 per screen early on. But when you do find a screening, it will be like finding a polished diamond in a mountain of slag. To call this film a George Clooney spectacular might be misleading. We have come to expect extravagance from this "s" word, something this film is not. It is spare and smoky (both literally and figuratively)
NEWS
March 7, 2001
Alecia Foster NORTHEAST GLENDALE -- Tonight will kick off a Latin film festival at Glendale Community College. The festival is in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Assn. of Latin American Students and will be sponsored by the association and the Ethnic Studies Department. Films will be shown every Wednesday through May 2. Admission is free and refreshments will be served. All films begin at 7 p.m. in the J.W. Smith Student Center conference, Room 212. "Salt of the Earth," the story of Mexican-American miners struggling for equal pay and the formation of a union, will be shown tonight.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | May 3, 2014
Assemblymen Mike Gatto (D-Silver Lake) and Raul Bocanegra (D-Pacoima) responded this week to a report about the state's filming industry that suggests new tax incentives might help keep movie and television studios shooting in California. The California Legislative Analyst's Office found that each job directly created by the movie industry in California generates 2.7 indirect jobs, resulting in the addition of hundreds of thousands of new positions. Also, the report found that for every dollar spent, there is a dollar-for-dollar return to state and local governments.
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NEWS
By Andy Klein | May 1, 2014
Presumably to avoid confusion, Sony has added the words "The Amazing" to the titles of its current Spider-Man series. What? He wasn't amazing the first time around? Was Tobey Maguire the Meh Spider-Man? This rebranding feels like a defensive gesture, given that the character (as played by Andrew Garfield in 2012) was no more amazing than his 2002 counterpart (Maguire). And the film was frankly somewhat less amazing. Is it any different this time? It would make sense to compare this second installment of Sony's reboot to its counterpart in the previous Spider-Man trilogy.
NEWS
By Andy Klein | April 18, 2014
Several years back, after Johnny Depp's twin triumphs in "Once Upon a Time in Mexico" and the first "Pirates of the Caribbean," I started referring to him as the God Who Walks Among Us. (I think that qualifies as "ironic hyperbole. ") Now, in "Transcendence," he actually plays the God Who Walks Among Us or, to be technical, the God Who Walks Among, Around, and Inside Us. The setup is a variation on old themes: Will (Depp) is a cyber-scientist so brilliant that he actually has fans jockeying around for his autograph.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | April 11, 2014
The people behind “Draft Day” like to say that it's not “about football”; it's about “characters” or “a man under pressure” or something like that. This is a blatant attempt to appeal to filmgoers who don't follow the game or don't even care about it. I'm among that demographic, so I can attest that their claim is valid. I don't even pay much attention to the Super Bowl, and even less to the draft - yeah, I know, that makes me practically un-American - and yet I was fully engaged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | March 28, 2014
The last time Russell Crowe and Jennifer Connelly got together was for “A Beautiful Mind,” in which she played the devoted wife of a man who heard voices in his head and communicated with an imaginary buddy. This time it's completely different: She plays the devoted wife of a man and his invisible boss, who tells him to prepare for a giant flood by building a huge ark. Welcome to Darren Aronofsky's “Noah.” Following a very sketchy outline of the Creation - did we really need this bit of exposition?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | March 28, 2014
Ingmar Bergman's 1966 masterpiece is so brilliant it's dangerous. It's the only film that ever made me want to jump off a bridge (back when I saw it in college). Really. Watching it now on Criterion's new Blu-ray, I found it just as fascinating, but not quite as powerful, thank goodness. Some of the diminution is just the passing of a few decades. But it's also because watching it in the familiarity of home rather than a big, half-empty theater cranks down the despair a bit. Bergman regular Bibi Andersson plays a nurse assigned to look after an actress (Liv Ullmann, in the first of her many performances for the director)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | March 21, 2014
You've got to hand it to Veronica Roth, the 25-year-old author of “Divergent” and its two sequels. Following the success of Suzanne Collins' “Hunger Games” books, Roth wrote a book that emulated (or lifted, if you want) as much from Collins's novel as one legally could - the central character, the dystopian setup, and the style, for a start. The first chapter reads like a perverse writing assignment: Clone the opening of “Hunger Games” without giving grounds for a lawsuit. She is one smart cookie - which doesn't necessarily mean her book is good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | March 14, 2014
Except for a few dodgy plot tricks, “The Art of the Steal” is a pleasantly modest entry in that overdone genre, the heist film. It's got “Canadian production” written all over it, from writer/director Jonathan Sobol to a cast that includes Kenneth Welsh, Jay Baruchel, Stephen McHattie, Jason Jones and Katheryn Winnick, among an essentially all-Canadian roster. The three big exceptions are the three best-known stars - Kurt Russell, Matt Dillon and Terence Stamp. Nothing wrong with a Canadian production in general, though, presumably as a condition for various funds, the setting briefly switches to Quebec City for no particularly pressing reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | March 7, 2014
Nominated for this year's Animation Oscar, the excellent “Ernest & Celestine” was, sad to say, not the winner. It was a tough field - hey, there was a Miyazaki film in there too - and I have no unkind words for “Frozen,” the winner, either. We've all heard the frankly hollow line about there not being any losers. But, in this particular case, there is some justification. On the eve of the expansion of its U.S. release, the lovely French/Belgian co-production will benefit from its brief mention in last week's world-televised awards show - one of the dullest ever, by the way. In outline, the setup is not wholly unlike many of the animated features coming out of Hollywood: lovable anthropomorphized animals play out humanoid conflicts and realize that we all have to learn to live together.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
Good morning, readers. Today is Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014. In the Burbank and Glendale, the high will be 70 and low 50.  Here are some of the top headlines in the region this morning: A storm is headed to the Los Angeles area , and it could be the wettest in two years, according to the Los Angeles Times.    A 5-year-old boy was struck by a vehicle while crossing the street in Burbank Monday afternoon. The driver apparently tried to flee the scene and was arrested, police said.    More than 1,000 entertainment industry workers gathered in Burbank on Saturday, launching a campaign to support an expansion of California's film and TV tax credit program . Former Glendale Police Chief Ron De Pompa made about $370,000 during the last calendar year , according to annual gross salary data publicly released by the city this month - the most any city employee has netted in years.
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