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Film Industry

NEWS
April 9, 2001
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- Assemblyman Dario Frommer will be focusing on the film industry in his latest assignment. Frommer (D-Glendale) this week was appointed chairman of the Assembly's recently formed Select Committee on the Future of California's Film Industry. "I'm anxious to get this committee moving," Frommer said in a statement. The nation's slowing economy, recent layoffs announced by The Walt Disney Co. and the threat of an entertainment strike this year could worsen the effects of runaway production, he said.
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NEWS
August 11, 2000
Alexa Capeloto Ralph Winter, co-producer of the smash film "X-Men," knew he had a hit when he couldn't get tickets to his own movie on opening night. Winter, who has lived in the Glendale area most his life, likes to watch his films with the public to see their reaction firsthand. But when "X-Men" opened July 14 at Pasadena's Pacific Hastings Theatres, the producer had to settle for a 10:30 p.m. showing because the 7:30 p.m. tickets were sold out. "It's fun to watch people enjoy your movie," said Winter, settling into an armchair in his office.
NEWS
April 5, 2000
We are a group of 12 families that are employed in various capacities by the TV and film industry and whose children all attend a public elementary school in La Crescenta. Our aim is to demystify the entertainment industry and to place a human face on the film industry tax initiative issue. There are 249,700 people employed by this industry in Los Angeles County and 600,000 in California generating $35 billion in state revenue. Our industry surpasses all others in employee numbers for our region.
NEWS
February 23, 2000
Gerald R.Lampton Scott Wildman's Economics is for the Birds I take exception to Scott Wildman's contribution to the Community Forum, 'Let's Bring Hollywood Home.' (Feb. 17) Please, Scott, let's not. Wildman advocates a 10% tax credit for the labor costs of below-the-line workers in the film industry. But why should taxpayers provide a protectionist subsidy to the film industry? The answer is, they shouldn't. Film producers, driven by consumer demand for less expensive forms of entertainment, are forced by the marketplace to obtain the best value for their film production dollars.
NEWS
December 28, 1999
Paul M. Anderson GLENDALE -- Filmmaking flourished in Glendale in its first decades. But when the silent era gave way to talkies, Glendale's film industry fizzled. As Glendale heads into a new millenium, the movie business appears to be making a Hollywood-style comeback. "It's kind of come full circle," said Rob Sharkey, president of the Glendale Homeowner's Coordinating Council, an umbrella organization for the city's homeowners associations.
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