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THE818NOW
January 25, 2012
On a cold, wet afternoon two cowboys trudge across a muddy street in a western town carrying saddles on their backs as a loud speaker blasts Jim Croce's hit song "I got a Name. " The scene was being played out at the historic Melody Ranch in Santa Clarita , where director Quentin Tarantino was filming his upcoming western "Django Unchained," starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jamie Foxx. "It's a blast shooting here," Tarantino said in a break from shooting. "Most other western towns look like dollhouses.
NEWS
March 16, 2009
Assemblyman Paul Krekorian joined teenagers at Clark Magnet High School on Friday to produce a commercial for the second annual FilmFest43, a showcase of student shorts to be held at the Alex Theatre on May 15. Krekorian is calling for submissions for the competition from students throughout the state?s 43rd Assembly District, which includes Glendale and Burbank. Krekorian?s office received more than 100 submissions for the festival last year, when Anna Tschetter, a student from Burbank?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | May 7, 2008
Robert Horsting is combining his two passions — history and filmmaking — in his new documentary “Citizen Tanouye,” and making some inroads into promoting peace and ending hate and intolerance. The Glendale resident and his friend Craig Yahata of Valencia have co-directed and produced the documentary that is based on the life of a Japanese American who was killed while serving in Italy during World War II. The documentary has won several awards at film festivals and will be broadcast this week on American Public Television stations, including KLCS.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | October 25, 2008
Two local filmmakers have created a short film illustrating author Paulo Coelho’s material and are eagerly awaiting the chance to share it with the community. Tadeh Daschi of Glendale was the cinematographer, director, screenwriter, editor and composer for the film “The Witch of Portobello,” based on a chapter from Coelho’s book of the same name. He shared producing responsibilities with Carolena Sabah of Tujunga, who plays the main character in the film and is the executive producer.
FEATURES
By Chris Wiebe | April 14, 2008
Saturday was a day of milestones at the Alex Theatre during the sixth annual 168 Film Festival, which gives filmmakers one week to write, shoot and produce a film based on a Bible verse selected at random. This year’s winner for Best Film — “Stained,” which is about a society that isolates its undesirables — became the first production shot on a high-density RED ONE Digital Camera to take the top prize at a festival. The RED ONE camera is being touted as a more cost-effective tool for fledgling filmmakers to capture big-budget movie quality.
NEWS
By Vince Lovato | March 13, 2006
These filmmakers had a week to write a script based on a Bible verse, a week to do the filming and a day to show it off. The manic competition was part of The fourth annual 168 Hour Film Festival designed to give faith-based filmmakers a chance to make a movie that is guaranteed to be judged and shown at a film festival, spokesman Carl Swansonsaid. Saturday's festival at the Alex Theatre was the first time it was not held at a church, Swanson said. "It's so cool because they will get to sit in a movie theater and see their movies on a 48-foot screen," Swanson said.
NEWS
July 5, 2003
Ryan Carter A new film produced by three local Armenian filmmakers about rediscovering a homeland, its culture and love, will soon be on the big screen in Glendale. "The Journey" opens Friday at the Glendale Cinemas, 501 N. Orange Street. The story is set in 1991 and is about Eve, a photojournalist who is sent from New York to her native Armenia, where political changes are rapidly occurring and the country is moving toward independence. In the process of covering the events for her magazine, Eve comes to terms with the loss of a childhood friend who had been killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | November 29, 2013
In Spike Lee's “Oldboy,” Josh Brolin plays Joe Doucett, an obnoxious, drunken advertising man who is mysteriously kidnapped and tossed into a “private prison,” with only a TV for companionship. Just as mysteriously, he's released 20 years later. Thanks to his electric friend, he knows that his wife has been murdered, he's been framed for the crime, and his daughter has been raised by foster parents. Waking up in the middle of nowhere - within a major city, no less - he has an understandable obsession with finding his daughter, figuring out who has stolen that many years from his life, and most of all, learning why he's been imprisoned.
NEWS
August 3, 2001
Linda LaZar Every now and then I find a business that is so unusual and enjoyable it is difficult to write a story quick enough to keep up with my enthusiasm for it. This time, the place is called the Kiosk, or the Woodlands Kiosk Cafe. Sure, a little food is served there, like gourmet coffees, teas, muffins, pies and sandwiches. But the food isn't what will bring you back a hundred times. It's the ambience, the camaraderie, the movies projected outside across 12 feet on the side of the building, and the pure pleasure of being there.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kirk Silsbee | May 2, 2014
Dailey Pike didn't come to Los Angeles in 1979 to make documentary movies. His life was stand-up comedy; he was on a first-name basis with Jay Leno and Arsenio Hall. He warmed up TV audiences for shows like “Cheers,” “The Drew Carey Show,” “Dharma and Greg,” “Ellen” and made a good living. But he also had a photographic eye. “In the early '80s,” recounts the 62-year-old Pike, “the public access cable stations made time available to the public. They were hungry for content, and I'd drive around L.A. and turn my camera on some interesting things, like a street protest or something like that.” At some point, Pike turned his hand to photographing jazz musicians.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | November 29, 2013
In Spike Lee's “Oldboy,” Josh Brolin plays Joe Doucett, an obnoxious, drunken advertising man who is mysteriously kidnapped and tossed into a “private prison,” with only a TV for companionship. Just as mysteriously, he's released 20 years later. Thanks to his electric friend, he knows that his wife has been murdered, he's been framed for the crime, and his daughter has been raised by foster parents. Waking up in the middle of nowhere - within a major city, no less - he has an understandable obsession with finding his daughter, figuring out who has stolen that many years from his life, and most of all, learning why he's been imprisoned.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | September 25, 2013
Chevy Chase Library rolled out the red carpet on Saturday for more than a dozen young Glendale filmmakers who screened their films during the Chevy Chase Youth Film Festival. Last February, Glendale resident and mother Jeanette Reedy Solano rallied children and teens living in the Chevy Chase Canyon to produce films no longer than 12 minutes long based on a poem, short story or novel. In addition, the youngsters had to write their own scripts without help from parents and accomplish all the directing.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | July 11, 2013
In what's called "The Best Student Film Festival Ever," an event on Friday at the Sparr Heights Community Center will feature the works of 15 local students from Glendale and La Cañada schools. The young filmmakers behind the projects created their short movies outside of class, with no set rules, except they can't film anything inappropriate. Organizers behind the festival - Chris Vinan and Ebner De Torres - are both 2012 graduates of Crescenta Valley High School now studying film at Temple University in Philadelphia and Cal State, Northridge, respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | July 5, 2013
Coming from a 90-year-old director, the title "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet" may seem ironic, but I'd rather think of it as "optimistic" and "cheeky" - given that filmmaker Alain Resnais has already finished shooting his next feature, now in postproduction. After becoming internationally known for his Holocaust documentary "Night and Fog," Resnais became (arguably) the most avant garde filmmaker of the French New Wave. His second nondocumentary, "Last Year at Marienbad," remains hugely influential and endlessly fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | July 21, 2012
It may be too obvious an intro, but filmmaker Todd Solondz - whose new film “Dark Horse” opens next week - could himself be considered a dark horse. His films have a strong following at festivals and in art houses, but they are too honest, too dark, and too bitterly funny to fit any major studio's notion of “commercial.” Most of all, they are relentlessly unsentimental - which doesn't mean they're not emotionally engaging. He first attracted attention with “Welcome to the Dollhouse” (1995)
THE818NOW
January 25, 2012
On a cold, wet afternoon two cowboys trudge across a muddy street in a western town carrying saddles on their backs as a loud speaker blasts Jim Croce's hit song "I got a Name. " The scene was being played out at the historic Melody Ranch in Santa Clarita , where director Quentin Tarantino was filming his upcoming western "Django Unchained," starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jamie Foxx. "It's a blast shooting here," Tarantino said in a break from shooting. "Most other western towns look like dollhouses.
THE818NOW
The Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2011
Walt Disney 's 1994 animated blockbuster "The Lion King" certainly hasn't been an endangered species for the studio. Not with an international gross of $788.2 million. Though it hasn't been out on DVD or VHS since 2004, Disney reports it is the most successful title in home entertainment history. The film has also spawned two straight-to-video sequels and a TV series. And the Broadway musical version has played more than 5,000 performances as of this week and won six Tony Awards including best musical.
NEWS
By Stan Wawer | November 10, 2010
Lights, camera, action! "All right, Mr. DeMille, I'm ready for my close-up. " Gloria Swanson uttered those words 60 years ago in Billy Wilder's film noir — "Sunset Boulevard. " The movie was nominated for 11 Academy Awards, winning three, and is considered a classic. Great filmmaking is an art and "Sunset Boulevard" is one of Hollywood's all-time artistic triumphs. Now Glendale Arts is asking young filmmakers the question: "How does art define your community/city?" Glendale Arts, with the support of the Glendale Kiwanis Club, Sedna Solutions and It Factory Media, launched a video project, "My Art, My City Student Filmmaking Contest," geared toward Glendale and its neighboring communities' 16- to 24-year-olds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kindred | September 4, 2010
There's no need to book a ticket to Cannes, Venice or Toronto to see some of the best movies made by independent filmmakers. There will be 170 films, many of them never seen before, screened at the Burbank International Film Festival from Sept. 10 to 19. Some of this year's participants are new to the industry. Others, like Burbank resident Mark Kirkland, have been seen on credit rolls for years — in Kirkland's case, as director of 65 episodes of TV's "The Simpsons. " He has two entries.
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