Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsFluoride
IN THE NEWS

Fluoride

RELATED KEYWORDS:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jason Wells | November 12, 2007
GLENDALE — Small amounts of fluoride will begin flowing from local water taps as soon as Tuesday as regional water plants that feed Glendale and the foothills start introducing the compound, water officials said. Fluoridation won’t fully take hold in Glendale until Nov. 26, when the compound is introduced at the Granada Hills-based Jensen Water Plant — Glendale’s main supplier through the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. La Crescenta and other unincorporated foothill communities will get stronger doses on Tuesday since most of that region’s water comes from the Weymouth Plant in La Verne, said Nina Jazmadarian, general manager of the Foothill Municipal Water District, which acts as an intermediary between Metropolitan and the Crescenta Valley Water District for about 40% of its supply.
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | July 17, 2009
CITY HALL — The city’s tap water now contains more than triple the amount of fluoride since it was folded into a statewide fluoridation project in late 2007, according to Glendale Water & Power’s latest annual water quality report released this week. The higher levels of tooth decay-fighting fluoride in the 2008 annual report, mailed out to customers earlier this week, reflects the full effect of the fluoridation since it began, officials said. State health officials mandated more of the naturally occurring compound in all public drinking water supplies in an effort to increase dental health.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | May 1, 2007
GLENDALE — Brushing three times a day, flossing and swishing mouthwash — the optimal tooth-care regimen — can be taxing on time and discipline. But starting in October, help will flow from the water faucet. That's when Glendale and La Crescenta water districts will begin importing water infused with low levels of fluoride — a move public health officials say will help fight tooth decay. The naturally occurring substance can already be found in local water supplies at levels up to 0.3 milligrams per liter, but those will rise to about 0.8 milligrams per liter after the Metropolitan Water District — a major supplier of water to Glendale and La Crescenta — begins adding fluorosilicic acid to its water in October, water officials said.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 29, 2007
GLENDALE — Plans to begin fluoridating the water that flows from Glendale and Crescenta Valley taps — originally scheduled for Oct. 1 — will be delayed to Nov. 12, regional water officials said. Instead of sticking to the original target date, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California — which exclusively supplies almost all Southland municipal water agencies, including Glendale and Crescenta Valley — will stagger the introduction of the tooth-decay-fighting chemical among its five major water plants.
NEWS
By Gary Null | November 15, 2007
In John Miller?s recent response to an Oct. 3 opinion piece about the health risks of water fluoridation, I was referred to as an unreliable spokesman for anti-water fluoridation (?Fluoride in water is not end of the world,? Community Commentary). Putting aside Miller?s unsupported attacks on my ?practices and credentials,? I nevertheless stand in excellent company as a proponent against the use of fluorides-14 with Nobel Prize laureates in chemistry and medicine who are on record for either directly opposing or expressing strong reservations about fluoride?
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | February 2, 2008
Sitting in a dentist’s chair for the first time, 10-year-old Patrik Gibeily was feeling nervous and a bit scared. His father, Abe Gibeily, tried to reassure him, telling him that none of his teeth was going to be pulled, that no one was going to hurt him. “Relax, relax, nothing’s going to happen to you,” Gibeily told his son. Patrik started to calm down after Dr. Stephen Giovanisci introduced himself, and he smiled...
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | July 3, 2007
GLENDALE — The city's water supply has received a relatively clean bill of health even as water officials prepare to clean contaminated soil and water beneath a leaking underground storage tank at a Chevron on West Glenoaks Boulevard. Levels of the now-discontinued gas additive Methl Tertiary-butyl Ether, or MTBE, has contaminated the soil and water down to 85 feet below the storage tank, officials with the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, said. The site, at 1501 W. Glenoaks Blvd.
NEWS
October 29, 2007
Please, can we have a little peace and quiet Well, it took a number of us to complain to City Council and put an end to the less than stellar decision by our Glendale City Council to use helicopter patrol to disturb our sanity and our sleep to try to catch a few speeders. For a few weeks, I was enjoying peaceful nights of sleep. But over the last few weeks, I have begun to notice the ever-increasing freight and transportation trains roaring through our city starting at 9 p.m. and continuing every 20 minutes to a half hour through to 1 a.m. during the hours when most of us are trying to get to sleep, laying unmercifully on the air horns so loud they could wake the dead.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | July 17, 2009
CITY HALL — The city’s tap water now contains more than triple the amount of fluoride since it was folded into a statewide fluoridation project in late 2007, according to Glendale Water & Power’s latest annual water quality report released this week. The higher levels of tooth decay-fighting fluoride in the 2008 annual report, mailed out to customers earlier this week, reflects the full effect of the fluoridation since it began, officials said. State health officials mandated more of the naturally occurring compound in all public drinking water supplies in an effort to increase dental health.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | February 2, 2008
Sitting in a dentist’s chair for the first time, 10-year-old Patrik Gibeily was feeling nervous and a bit scared. His father, Abe Gibeily, tried to reassure him, telling him that none of his teeth was going to be pulled, that no one was going to hurt him. “Relax, relax, nothing’s going to happen to you,” Gibeily told his son. Patrik started to calm down after Dr. Stephen Giovanisci introduced himself, and he smiled...
NEWS
By Gary Null | November 15, 2007
In John Miller?s recent response to an Oct. 3 opinion piece about the health risks of water fluoridation, I was referred to as an unreliable spokesman for anti-water fluoridation (?Fluoride in water is not end of the world,? Community Commentary). Putting aside Miller?s unsupported attacks on my ?practices and credentials,? I nevertheless stand in excellent company as a proponent against the use of fluorides-14 with Nobel Prize laureates in chemistry and medicine who are on record for either directly opposing or expressing strong reservations about fluoride?
NEWS
By Jason Wells | November 12, 2007
GLENDALE — Small amounts of fluoride will begin flowing from local water taps as soon as Tuesday as regional water plants that feed Glendale and the foothills start introducing the compound, water officials said. Fluoridation won’t fully take hold in Glendale until Nov. 26, when the compound is introduced at the Granada Hills-based Jensen Water Plant — Glendale’s main supplier through the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. La Crescenta and other unincorporated foothill communities will get stronger doses on Tuesday since most of that region’s water comes from the Weymouth Plant in La Verne, said Nina Jazmadarian, general manager of the Foothill Municipal Water District, which acts as an intermediary between Metropolitan and the Crescenta Valley Water District for about 40% of its supply.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 29, 2007
GLENDALE — Plans to begin fluoridating the water that flows from Glendale and Crescenta Valley taps — originally scheduled for Oct. 1 — will be delayed to Nov. 12, regional water officials said. Instead of sticking to the original target date, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California — which exclusively supplies almost all Southland municipal water agencies, including Glendale and Crescenta Valley — will stagger the introduction of the tooth-decay-fighting chemical among its five major water plants.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | July 3, 2007
GLENDALE — The city's water supply has received a relatively clean bill of health even as water officials prepare to clean contaminated soil and water beneath a leaking underground storage tank at a Chevron on West Glenoaks Boulevard. Levels of the now-discontinued gas additive Methl Tertiary-butyl Ether, or MTBE, has contaminated the soil and water down to 85 feet below the storage tank, officials with the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, said. The site, at 1501 W. Glenoaks Blvd.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | May 1, 2007
GLENDALE — Brushing three times a day, flossing and swishing mouthwash — the optimal tooth-care regimen — can be taxing on time and discipline. But starting in October, help will flow from the water faucet. That's when Glendale and La Crescenta water districts will begin importing water infused with low levels of fluoride — a move public health officials say will help fight tooth decay. The naturally occurring substance can already be found in local water supplies at levels up to 0.3 milligrams per liter, but those will rise to about 0.8 milligrams per liter after the Metropolitan Water District — a major supplier of water to Glendale and La Crescenta — begins adding fluorosilicic acid to its water in October, water officials said.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|