Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsFounding Fathers
IN THE NEWS

Founding Fathers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 26, 2004
Your recent opinion letter on the "Big Tent" ("It's a Big Tent," CV Sun, July 9) and corresponding letter to the editor from La Canada's own Mr. Tanabe ("A Chauvinistic Thought, CV Sun, July 9) raise some interesting questions about what our founding fathers really intended when it comes to freedom of speech. After reading Mr. Tanabe's letter (which I liken to choking down a really a really bad meal), I don't think the founding fathers intended for the press to provide a "free" forum for absurd thought.
NEWS
May 30, 2002
I can't believe that the City Council wants such an astronomical increase in its "salary." The founding fathers of our great nation served our country for free! The City Council members should consider it an honor and a privilege to serve our community. Employees in the private sector who are on a "salary" work above and beyond their scheduled work hours every day and do not receive monetary compensation such as this. As a nurse, I have been lucky to receive a 2% raise in four years of service.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
Who is it that decides what is "absurd" thought in this newspaper? (Re: "The Big Tent-Really Now!" CV Sun, July 23) Yes, I agree the letter from Mr. Tanabe ("A Chauvinistic Thought," CV Sun, July 9) was not helpful to an open-minded debate. But Mr. Mansur uses this as an excuse to say he has no hope of "intellectual discourse" on serious issues facing this nation with "people on the right side of the right wing" since they have no "ability to truly debate." Most unfortunately for our country in this election year, I see no one of Mr. Mansur's persuasion intelligently debating the important issues, only bashing Bush and spewing hate.
NEWS
February 22, 2005
The News-Press and Leader visited Arax Zarzavatjian's fifth-grade class and asked: 'What aspect of Colonial-American life is still important today?' "I think the Declaration of Independence is the most important thing. It still lasts and gives us our independence." DAVIT JAVADIAN, 10 "Their inventions, because we still use them today, like electricity. We use electricity for games, the [PlayStation 2], the computer, TV." AREEN AZOAIN, 11 "Their inventions, like electricity.
NEWS
March 4, 2005
Josh Kleinbaum About 350 of Glendale's movers and shakers considered the separation of church and state at the annual Mayor's Prayer Breakfast on Thursday. Lloyd Ogilvie, former chaplain of the U.S. Senate, served as the keynote speaker at the event, drawing a standing ovation with his speech about the religious devotion of the nation's founding fathers. He drew tears from some in the audience when discussing the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, when he led thousands in prayer in front of the Capitol before being taken to a secure room with members of the Senate.
NEWS
July 4, 2005
"We mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor." Following these words, 56 men put their signatures on the Declaration of Independence. They knew that the most formidable military in the world was just 20 miles away. Had those signers been captured, the penalty for their sedition statement would be death. How many times in the history of the world had so many men of high esteem, wealth and education put their lives on the line for such a grand objective?
NEWS
September 17, 2002
Having read your editorial of Sept. 14, I thank you for bringing this matter to the public's attention. Your suggestion, "Let's leave religion out of public governance," provides us with an opportunity to examine the role of government and religion. According to the United States Constitution: Amendment 1 "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."
NEWS
By Joe Puglia | March 30, 2007
Bob! Let's have a heart to heart. Have a seat! Pour yourself a drink and read these thoughts and when you're finished, read them again. The contents herein are on the final and believe me you're going to need an A to pass the course. I'm not a very reactionary guy, but I find it necessary to render some thoughts regarding a letter to the editor that ran in the Valley Sun a few weeks back ["True or False," by Bob Tanabe, Our Readers Write ? or Wrong, March 1]. Some of my friends got raked over the coals because of their political points of view.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | October 17, 2008
Over the years I have tried to explain to my students what the framers of our Constitution had in mind when they created the electoral college. For those of you who have struggled to understand why we have the voting system that we do, you might sympathize with youngsters likewise struggling to comprehend it for the first time. Part of my job is to explain how the system works, and invariably when I attempt to do that a discussion follows, the central question being, “Why doesn’t the presidency just go to the person who gets the most votes?
NEWS
By Larry Varnes | July 18, 2008
The Fourth of July was a time for reflection. Our Founding Fathers were leaders with vision and backbone. They took chances and made decisions that would shape the free world. They didn?t study it to death. They were men of action. That?s what leaders should do. What has happened to our leaders today? Every issue now needs a study group. Political correctness supersedes everything else. Seemingly, today nothing gets done in real time. The problem is everywhere. I was in Santa Fe during the Fourth of July holiday and saw the following headline in the Santa Fe New Mexican regarding drilling for oil and natural gas: ?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | October 17, 2008
Over the years I have tried to explain to my students what the framers of our Constitution had in mind when they created the electoral college. For those of you who have struggled to understand why we have the voting system that we do, you might sympathize with youngsters likewise struggling to comprehend it for the first time. Part of my job is to explain how the system works, and invariably when I attempt to do that a discussion follows, the central question being, “Why doesn’t the presidency just go to the person who gets the most votes?
Advertisement
NEWS
By Larry Varnes | July 18, 2008
The Fourth of July was a time for reflection. Our Founding Fathers were leaders with vision and backbone. They took chances and made decisions that would shape the free world. They didn?t study it to death. They were men of action. That?s what leaders should do. What has happened to our leaders today? Every issue now needs a study group. Political correctness supersedes everything else. Seemingly, today nothing gets done in real time. The problem is everywhere. I was in Santa Fe during the Fourth of July holiday and saw the following headline in the Santa Fe New Mexican regarding drilling for oil and natural gas: ?
NEWS
By Joe Puglia | March 30, 2007
Bob! Let's have a heart to heart. Have a seat! Pour yourself a drink and read these thoughts and when you're finished, read them again. The contents herein are on the final and believe me you're going to need an A to pass the course. I'm not a very reactionary guy, but I find it necessary to render some thoughts regarding a letter to the editor that ran in the Valley Sun a few weeks back ["True or False," by Bob Tanabe, Our Readers Write ? or Wrong, March 1]. Some of my friends got raked over the coals because of their political points of view.
NEWS
July 4, 2005
"We mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor." Following these words, 56 men put their signatures on the Declaration of Independence. They knew that the most formidable military in the world was just 20 miles away. Had those signers been captured, the penalty for their sedition statement would be death. How many times in the history of the world had so many men of high esteem, wealth and education put their lives on the line for such a grand objective?
NEWS
June 22, 2005
Herbert Molano Many of Glendale's high schools' graduating class of 2005 leave their schools facing a life mixed with the usual hope and anticipation, but tinged with apprehension. This was the class that started its high school experience with the events of Sept. 11, 2001, and finish with the nation at war. We hope that the resilient nature of our heritage will carry them forward to achieve the inherited dream of each generation -- that they will live a life better than that of their parents.
NEWS
March 4, 2005
Should the theory that a superior being created life be taught in public schools alongside the theory of evolution? That's what Jay Sekulow recently argued in a column for Knight Ridder. Sekulow, chief counsel for the American Center for Law and Justice, says scientific evidence suggests that the complexity of life -- such as the uniqueness of each person's DNA -- points to a creator. In my opinion, presenting students with an opportunity to study all sides of any issue is the way to direct them into critical thinking.
NEWS
March 4, 2005
Josh Kleinbaum About 350 of Glendale's movers and shakers considered the separation of church and state at the annual Mayor's Prayer Breakfast on Thursday. Lloyd Ogilvie, former chaplain of the U.S. Senate, served as the keynote speaker at the event, drawing a standing ovation with his speech about the religious devotion of the nation's founding fathers. He drew tears from some in the audience when discussing the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, when he led thousands in prayer in front of the Capitol before being taken to a secure room with members of the Senate.
NEWS
February 22, 2005
The News-Press and Leader visited Arax Zarzavatjian's fifth-grade class and asked: 'What aspect of Colonial-American life is still important today?' "I think the Declaration of Independence is the most important thing. It still lasts and gives us our independence." DAVIT JAVADIAN, 10 "Their inventions, because we still use them today, like electricity. We use electricity for games, the [PlayStation 2], the computer, TV." AREEN AZOAIN, 11 "Their inventions, like electricity.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
Who is it that decides what is "absurd" thought in this newspaper? (Re: "The Big Tent-Really Now!" CV Sun, July 23) Yes, I agree the letter from Mr. Tanabe ("A Chauvinistic Thought," CV Sun, July 9) was not helpful to an open-minded debate. But Mr. Mansur uses this as an excuse to say he has no hope of "intellectual discourse" on serious issues facing this nation with "people on the right side of the right wing" since they have no "ability to truly debate." Most unfortunately for our country in this election year, I see no one of Mr. Mansur's persuasion intelligently debating the important issues, only bashing Bush and spewing hate.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|