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By Maane Khatchatourian | August 26, 2009
Judeth Davis first realized she had a talent for sculpting when her husband was suffering from a mental illness. She created a clay portrait of her daughter on a whim about 14 years ago, and the Glendale resident is now a nationally renowned sculptor and the new president of the Pasadena Society of Artists. Although never formally trained in sculpture, creating traditional-contemporary stone, terra cotta, bronze and synthetic sculptures comes naturally to her, Davis said. She creates portraits, or busts of her subjects, and figuratives, which are full-figure sculptures, in her home studio.
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By Terri Martin | May 12, 2010
T he exhibition "Music and Muses" is very personal for artist Christina Ramos. Her inspirations are family, Bible, music and natives from New Guinea, which she renders in a photo-realistic style, mastering the acrylic paint medium. Burbank's Creative Arts Center Gallery parses the prolific body of artwork, 64 pieces, all produced by the artist within the past six months, into thematic sections allowing for adequate space and distance for viewing. Images of Ramos and her family are threaded throughout the exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diana Gill Special to the Valley Sun | October 15, 2004
At the California Science Center viewers of "Body Worlds" are mystified and left in awe of the human body. This eerie exhibit uses real cadavers and body parts. "This exhibit gives the public an opportunity usually reserved for medical professionals," said Dr. Richard Sass, senior research scholar, Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. "Viewers get a chance to look inside their own bodies and experience the wonder and respect for what it means to be human." There are more than 200 specimens of organs, body parts, transparent slices and 25 whole body specimens in the exhibit.
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By Maane Khatchatourian | August 26, 2009
Judeth Davis first realized she had a talent for sculpting when her husband was suffering from a mental illness. She created a clay portrait of her daughter on a whim about 14 years ago, and the Glendale resident is now a nationally renowned sculptor and the new president of the Pasadena Society of Artists. Although never formally trained in sculpture, creating traditional-contemporary stone, terra cotta, bronze and synthetic sculptures comes naturally to her, Davis said. She creates portraits, or busts of her subjects, and figuratives, which are full-figure sculptures, in her home studio.
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