Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsFuture
IN THE NEWS

Future

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 6, 2012
I always thought Greg Krikorian did a decent job in often difficult situations as a Glendale school board member. But the latest revelation of his wife's bankruptcy (“ Krikorian shrugs off cash woes ,” July 1) raises serious concerns about his suitability for statewide office. How can we teach our children financial responsibility with credit cards and student loans if a candidate for elected office pursues the easy way out through Chapter 7? Greg Krikorian needs to get his own house in order before can tells us with a straight face that he has a plan for our state's fiscal future.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
I am very glad that Zareh Sinanyan finally took the step to own up to his offensive remarks made in the past on YouTube. And for his sake and for ours, I'm grateful for Zehra Siddiqui, the Glendale High freshman whose remarks brought him to the point of honesty about those remarks. I am left, however, with deep reservations about Sinanyan, whose record shows him (a) maintaining silence until after the election, (b) accusing a council member of lying for exposing those remarks, and (c)
THE818NOW
November 15, 2011
Santa Clarita is rolling out the red carpet for its storied movie ranches. The City Council for the suburban community in northern Los Angeles County recently approved a new zoning designation intended to promote filming on local ranches within a 30-mile radius. The designation establishes standard rules for shooting on the ranches, 10 of which are located in Santa Clarita. It will allow owners to build soundstages and other production-related facilities on their property without obtaining special permission. Additionally, ranch owners won't have to reapply for a special film-use permit every 10 years.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | September 10, 2012
I'd never visited a psychic, but I'd always secretly wanted to. Despite the outlandish claims and even more ridiculous prices I'd seen when browsing late-night advertising on TV during bouts of insomnia or boredom - and the entire mess that was Miss Cleo - were there genuine people among us who did have a connection to a world we knew little about, but always wondered about? My curiosity got the best of me this weekend and I made an appointment for an indulgent glimpse into my future.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
DAN KIMBER As a history teacher, I spend the better part of a year trying to convince my students that studying the past is important. If our ignorance of it does indeed condemn us to repeat it, then it is only right that we hold forth its lessons for the next generation who will soon be making their own history. In light of this, I find it most interesting at the end of the year to ask my students to use their knowledge of the past (and their fixation with the present)
NEWS
July 6, 2007
On Wednesday night, July 11, at 7 p.m., Calvary Chapel of the Foothills will be showing the movie "Epicenter." This video project tells the story of "Epicenter: Why the Current Rumblings in the Middle East Will Change Your Future," a nonfiction book by New York Times best-selling author and Middle East expert Joel C. Rosenberg. Jewish and Christian theology teaches that Israel is the epicenter of the world, Jerusalem is the epicenter of Israel, and the Temple Mount is the epicenter of Jerusalem.
FEATURES
June 24, 2006
The class of 2006 is a new generation with a whole new genre of knowledge. Sure its members come away from their 13 years of schooling with an education in math, literature, science and history. But they also have a technical vocabulary and computer literacy that didn't even exist when their parents graduated. They have come through the same teenage struggles as every class before them ? perhaps enough tougher ones than generations before them. And while technological advances have helped make many things easier for them, it was also a whole vast knowledge they had to soak up to survive ?
NEWS
June 15, 2007
Originally established by Mr. and Mrs. Chakib "Chuck" Sambar, the Glendale Scholarship Endowment was created to help local college bound students who are denied the opportunity of furthering their education due to a lack of family resources. Through the support of the Glendale community and a generous grant from the College Access Foundation of California, the endowment was able to make awards totaling more than $100,000 to over 100 of this year's graduating seniors. This is a remarkable accomplishment and a testimony to the vision of the endowment's founders and supporters.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
Moms at Mountain Avenue Elementary School gave parents a peek at the future Tuesday as they recruited attendees for its largest annual fundraiser, called "Mack to the Future," Friday at La Canada Country Club, sponsored by the foundation Mountain Avenue Committed to Kids. The event is a nod to Earth Day and also a salute to students' education. The foundation hopes to raise enough money to buy 38 computers by selling tickets to the event, raffles and a silent auction that features donated items like meals to local restaurants, a chance to be in a commercial and a golf session for four.
NEWS
By Dan Kimber | April 7, 2011
Editor's Note: Numerous instances of plagiarism have been discovered in Dan Kimber's “Education Matters” column, which ran in the News- Press from September 2003 to September 2011. In those columns where plagiarism has been found, a For the Record specifying the details will be appended to the piece. I saw one of those movies the other day that give us one of those bleak accounts of life in some distant future. There was hopelessness everywhere - lives were lived mechanically against the background of a sterile and colorless, often violent, world.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | March 12, 2014
La Crescenta resident Jim Luna has done a lot during the past 40 years to maintain his sprawling garden of vegetable plants and fruit trees, but he's seldom had to buy seeds. Instead of going to the store, he lets some of his crops do it themselves, allowing them to grow to the point that their seeds are strong enough to be used for more planting. That is, literally going to seed. PHOTOS: Jim Luna's garden of vegetable plants and fruit trees  The 64-year-old retiree's latest batch of garlic cloves descended from a seed that grew eight years ago. “People seem to think you have to go down to the store and pay $3.75 for seeds.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dan Evans, dan.evans@latimes.com | March 7, 2014
A bit less than a month ago, about two dozen people squeezed into a conference room at the Glendale YWCA, all there to share their feelings about the Glendale News-Press. The Wednesday evening meeting marked the inaugural of the paper's Community Advisory Board, something I hope to make a tradition for both the News-Press and the Burbank Leader. (As I write this, I am finalizing the time, date and venue for the Leader's community board, tentatively slated for later this month.) The purpose is simple: In order to serve its communities, the paper and its editor need to know what readers care about and couldn't care less about; what they like about our coverage and what makes them cringe, blanch or yawn.
NEWS
By Mark Kellam, mark.kellam@latimes.com | December 26, 2013
Before he was a teenager, Joseph Cordova's mother had died, he was living with his alcoholic grandmother and suffering from serious dental problems that tore down his confidence - and could have eventually led to life-threatening health problems. His front two teeth were chipped terribly. He had missing teeth and the ones that were in his mouth were crooked and riddled with cavities. And he had problems with his gums. However, with the help of Glendale Healthy Kids, a local pastor and a dentist at USC, Cordova now has a smile he is proud of and he's venturing into a real estate career.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | December 19, 2013
Just a few weeks ago, new Glendale Police Chief Robert Castro was wearing a different badge and uniform. But he has since shed his police chief garb and duties at the Glendora Police Department, and is now officially Glendale's police chief. “The city of Glendale deserves the best and I will promise every day to give you that,” Castro said Thursday at the Police Department headquarters. “I can tell you each and every day I will work hard to earn the right to wear this badge for you.” In a packed room that was standing room only, Castro was sworn in as the city's police chief as friends, family, fellow police officers and city officials looked on. His wife of 23 years, Cynthia, pinned his official police badge on his uniform Castro, 48, started as the Police Department's top cop on Monday, replacing retired Police Chief Ron De Pompa.
SPORTS
By Andrew J. Campa, andrew.campa@latimes.com | November 26, 2013
LA CRESCENTA - Perhaps one of the odder aspects of the 2012-2013 boys' soccer season, at least locally, was the absence of a championship team or contender. Powerhouse Crescenta Valley High and St. Francis made earlier-than-expected postseason exits, while Flintridge Prep, Glendale and Hoover highs continued to focus on progress. As the season begins, all five teams talked about taking steps to rectifying the lack of a crown. “I'm excited because we have five solid starters back from last season,” Crescenta Valley Coach Grant Clark said.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | September 5, 2013
Glendale officials and parents continue to debate the future of the dual-language immersion programs at Verdugo Woodlands and Monte Vista elementary schools, programs whose popularity has become a significant resource issue. Children involved in the program at Verdugo Woodlands, which began in 2010, spend 50% of the day speaking and learning in Japanese, but the school has little space left for expansion into the fifth and sixth grades. The Glendale school board will hold a special meeting on Thursday evening to discuss possible solutions for Verdugo Woodlands.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | August 31, 2013
A residential development in Glendale that just last week received approval to be built as condominiums has been put on the market. The 50-unit Colorado Gardens complex, located across from the Americana at Brand, has been put up for sale for $4.5 million by its owners, two top executives at Pacific BMW in Glendale. Colorado Gardens is notable for having won approval from the city's Planning Commission earlier this month to build condominiums on the 21,900-square-foot site. Glendale has seen a building boom of late, but mostly apartments, with roughly 2,000 units under construction currently.  Paul Darrow, director with Institutional Property Advisors, which is brokering the sale for Marcus & Millichap, said that it's not unusual to see projects purchased and entitled under one owner, then sold to another firm for construction and operation.
SPORTS
By Andrew Shortall, andrew.shortall@latimes.com | August 28, 2013
GLENDALE - Any first-year coach must find a way to keep one eye on the present and the other on the future. That's exactly the situation Hoover High football Coach Matt Andersen found himself in after stepping in to take over for Andrew Policky, who left for Arcadia High, in late May. Despite the late start, Andersen is pleased with where his team is positioned for its season opener and down the road. “We've done good, I think, I'm happy with how far we've come the past three months,” said Andersen, who inherits a squad that hasn't made the playoffs since 1987.
NEWS
By Joylene Wagner | August 11, 2013
There I was, in the forecourt of the Alex Theatre a few weeks after April's election, sampling my first bites of Glendale Healthy Kids' annual "Taste of Downtown Glendale," when News-Press Editor Dan Evans approached and asked me to consider becoming an education columnist. "Great idea!" chimed in my husband. "You've had eight years on the school board; you have a lot to share. " So I began to think of the many newsworthy topics and stories to be told: school-to-career opportunities and arts instruction, the benefits and drawbacks of standardized testing, what all those education acronyms mean and don't mean, what we've done - and must still do - to keep our children safe.
SPORTS
By Andrew Shortall, andrew.shortall@latimes.com | July 19, 2013
LA CRESCENTA - During the high school basketball season, Henry Alvarez can be found in the stands of the Crescenta Valley High gymnasium a handful of times a year. Alvarez, an incoming seventh-grader at Rosemont Middle School, estimates he attends about five Falcons boys' basketball games a year. Come summer time, he gets to take center court. Ever since Coach Z's Basketball Camp - a summer skills and fun clinic put on by CV Coach Shawn Zargarian - began seven years ago, Alvarez, 13, has faithfully been in attendance.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|