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NEWS
September 7, 2012
I've been reading a lot about the 710 gap, most of it negative. I believe the problem is that today people have built their own worlds around themselves. People ask, “how does this affect me?” instead of, “how does this affect everyone?” People have lost the concept of community. We need to think of the whole. The completion of a freeway would benefit the whole. Joseph Steckermeier Glendale
NEWS
August 24, 2012
Much of the Aug. 15 edition of the News-Press was devoted to coverage of the impassioned negative reaction of some local residents to a presentation by officials from the L.A. Metropolitan Transportation Agency who explained various proposals for an extension of the Long Beach (710) Freeway. I would like to speak for the silent majority in the Los Angeles basin who do not think they will be adversely affected by an extension of the 710 Freeway. A 710 Freeway that connects with the 210 Freeway was to be an integral part of the freeway system planned some 60 years ago for the Los Angeles Metro Area.
SPORTS
By Nathan Cambridge, Special to the News-Press | August 31, 2013
Last year was a season of transition for the Glendale High football program in the first year under a new head coach. Additionally, the feeling of a lack of complete cohesion between the senior and junior classes was an undertone as the Nitros finished with three wins in 10 tries. The Glendale squad is determined to be a cohesive group this season, and any gap between the classes, real or perceived, will not be an issue if senior Richard “Rico” Vorobyev has anything to say about it. “We're trying to make everyone get on the same page this year,” Vorobyev, a lineman listed at 5-foot-9, 250 pounds, said.
NEWS
October 7, 2000
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- The gap remains between the front-runners in the 21st state Senate District race. State Assemblyman Jack Scott (D-La Crescenta) has raised more than $2.3 million, while his Republican opponent, South Pasadena City Councilman Paul Zee, has received about than $1.3 million, according to campaign disclosure statements released this week. "Clearly, a lot of people have a lot of confidence in me because of the four years I've spent in the Assembly," Scott said.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
A good compromise to the long-standing argument between the our city and the city of Los Angeles about what to do with the Doran Street railroad crossing has been posed by Glendale Councilman Ara Najarian. Rather than building an overpass at the crossing - or implementing any of the four alternatives already on the table - Najarian suggests constructing two bridges. One would take drivers over the Los Angeles River and the other would cross the Verdugo Wash. Under Najarian's proposal, the railroad crossing at Doran would be closed down entirely . Such a move would not only improve safety at what is known as one of the most dangerous railroad crossings in the county, but also could potentially mean that the nearly 100 trains passing through that stretch around the clock would no longer have to give warning horn blasts, thus providing residents of the neighboring Pelanconi Estates some noise relief they've long sought.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | August 14, 2008
CITY HALL — Construction on a new $12.15-million Adult Recreation Center could begin by year’s end after more than a decade of development and planning after the City Council on Tuesday voted to bridge a $2-million funding gap using redevelopment revenue. The unanimous decision sends the long-planned project from the drawing board to reality in what will be the first major part of a complete redevelopment of the block bordered by Brand Boulevard and Colorado, Louise and Harvard streets.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | February 29, 2008
GLENDALE ? The average academic achievement levels of Latino students remain significantly below their peers in other ethnic subgroups in the Glendale Unified School District, prompting administrators to post an ?urgency statement? to keep the topic at the forefront of educators? minds. Copies of the statement ? which starting this year have been posted at the district?s administrative offices and campuses ? note that even though the Glendale Unified School District has reached high academic benchmarks, a significant number of its Latino students have not reached proficiency on state tests in English Language Arts and math.
NEWS
By Mercedes Aguila, for Times Community News | May 2, 2012
More than 60 people on Monday packed La Cañada High School for an update on the proposed extension of the Long Beach (710) Freeway - a long simmering issue on which many communities have already staked positions. The effects of closing the so-called “gap” between the 710 and Foothill (210) freeways will be disclosed in the coming months as state and county transportation officials prepare a draft environmental impact report, organizers of the meeting said. Alternatives for closing that gap that are being studied include a 4.5-mile surface extension - a proposal that is all but politically dead - a tunnel extension under South Pasadena, new transit and rail lines or upgrades to surface streets.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014
A good compromise to the long-standing argument between the our city and the city of Los Angeles about what to do with the Doran Street railroad crossing has been posed by Glendale Councilman Ara Najarian. Rather than building an overpass at the crossing - or implementing any of the four alternatives already on the table - Najarian suggests constructing two bridges. One would take drivers over the Los Angeles River and the other would cross the Verdugo Wash. Under Najarian's proposal, the railroad crossing at Doran would be closed down entirely . Such a move would not only improve safety at what is known as one of the most dangerous railroad crossings in the county, but also could potentially mean that the nearly 100 trains passing through that stretch around the clock would no longer have to give warning horn blasts, thus providing residents of the neighboring Pelanconi Estates some noise relief they've long sought.
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SPORTS
By Andrew J. Campa, andrew.campa@latimes.com | January 28, 2014
BURBANK - Challenged, but never overtaken, the surging Glendale High girls' water polo team continued its impressive push through the Pacific League by holding off Burroughs High, 9-7, on Tuesday afternoon. With the victory, the CIF Southern Section Division V ninth-ranked Nitros (11-2, 4-0) head into an undefeated showdown at four-time Pacific League champion Crescenta Valley, the third-ranked team, on Thursday afternoon. “We're going to give them our best. Crescenta Valley is a great team, but we're going to play our hardest,” said Nitros junior goalie Lara Thomas, who finished with six saves in two quarters of play.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 24, 2013
The Glendale Unified school board recently approved spending $750,000 in state funds to purchase 1,300 Google Chromebooks and other technological accessories to fill a computer gap before state standardized testing begins in the spring. As the state continues to roll out the new Common Core State Standards, officials with local school districts say they must secure more technology in order to have students take the new computerized exams. The new standards encourage critical thinking from students as they analyze non-literary texts and in-depth math problem-solving skills.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | December 6, 2013
The city of Glendale is finalizing its 100th entry in the Tournament of Roses Parade on Jan. 1. The first float was entered in 1911. But that was more than 100 years ago, right? Read on to find one reason for the disparity. Except for the World War II years, Glendale has been in the parade nearly continuously since 1911, making our city one of the longest-running entrants. Not only that, our floats were consistent prize winners right up until the war. The last float before the war, in 1941, depicted President Lincoln as the “Great Emancipator” and won the coveted sweepstakes.
NEWS
By Brian Crosby and By Brian Crosby | November 8, 2013
The phrase "achievement gap" often refers to the test-score discrepancies between white students and non-white students in public schools. However, the more alarming achievement gap is between high school work and college work. Plenty of students excel at the high-school level, enrolling in advanced placement classes and maintaining 4.0 GPAs. Yet something happens when they go to a four-year university where nearly one-third of college freshmen end up taking remedial English and math classes.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 2, 2013
The California Department of Transportation must quickly sell some of the nearly 500 properties it owns in Los Angeles, South Pasadena and Pasadena, according to a bill by Sen. Carol Liu (D-La Cañada Flintridge), which was signed into law Tuesday by Gov. Jerry Brown. The homes are located in the so-called 710 gap, where transportation officials are studying a 4.5-mile tunnel that would connect the Long Beach (710) and Foothill (210) freeways. Brown vetoed a similar bill last year.
SPORTS
By Nathan Cambridge, Special to the News-Press | August 31, 2013
Last year was a season of transition for the Glendale High football program in the first year under a new head coach. Additionally, the feeling of a lack of complete cohesion between the senior and junior classes was an undertone as the Nitros finished with three wins in 10 tries. The Glendale squad is determined to be a cohesive group this season, and any gap between the classes, real or perceived, will not be an issue if senior Richard “Rico” Vorobyev has anything to say about it. “We're trying to make everyone get on the same page this year,” Vorobyev, a lineman listed at 5-foot-9, 250 pounds, said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 30, 2013
Glendale officials plan to close a $1.2 million budget gap for next fiscal year without reducing staff or using money put aside for police vacancies. Compared to budget gaps of $15.4 million and $18 million, respectively, over the past two years, the much smaller figure this time around is a sign that Glendale's fiscal future is improving after taking a beating during the protracted recession and the loss of redevelopment, City Manager Scott Ochoa said at a budget study session this week.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 15, 2013
Over the next five years, Glendale may still face multi-million dollar budget gaps, even if revenues from property and sales taxes continue to climb at a steady rate, city officials said at a budget meeting Tuesday. But unlike in recent years, the shortfalls may not be as difficult to surmount as they've been in years past, thanks to a variety of ways to increase revenues, including new taxes, officials said. Rather than the $15.4-million and $18-million gaps of the past two years, respectively, the city may see deficits of $1.2 million to $11.3 million over the next five years, according to a city report.
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