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NEWS
September 26, 2003
As a way to supplement hand-clearance and machinery when clearing brush along hillsides in Glendale, the Fire Department developed a plan in March to bring controlled goat grazing to the city's hillsides. Goats can climb steep hillsides without disturbing the topsoil and eat just about anything. Those aspects of the project were attractive to the department because of concern of hill erosion. "I think realistically, they have a broader spectrum of what they will eat compared to most animals," Glendale Fire's Urban Forester Doug Nickles said.
NEWS
April 5, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum With names like Woody, Willie, Bottle Baby, Lucky and Nellie's Girl, they sound more like characters from a country and western song than Descanso Garden's newest protection against fire. More than 250 goats arrived at Descanso Gardens from Lakeview, Ore., this weekend, ready to eat their way through the overgrown chaparral and other brush that has become a fire hazard on the garden's western and southern perimeter. And yes, they each have a name, from Willie to Oreo to Star (although Star actually goes by Deeds, after Adam Sandler's character in the movie "Mr. Deeds")
NEWS
September 9, 2003
Darleene Barrientos The city's newest employees have a tough job -- eating, drinking, sleeping and eating some more. A herd of 93 grazing goats arrived Saturday to begin the Glendale Fire Department's new program to cut back the brush around homes where the terrain is too steep and wild for hand crews to access. Glendale has a history of destructive wildfires that ravage vegetation-dense hillsides. A year ago today, a fire consumed 752 acres of chaparral-covered open space behind Brand Park, threatening homes in Glendale and Burbank.
NEWS
November 1, 2003
Darleene Barrientos More than 300 goats have eaten just about everything in sight, and Glendale Fire officials are happy about it. The herd of goats brought in to clear brush in the steep hillsides of Glendale has eaten dry grass and underbrush, while leaving plants and trees alone. "I think they're doing a great job," said Doug Nickles, Glendale Fire's urban forester. "They're not removing shrubs, they're eating the underbrush. They seem to like the dry grasses.
LOCAL
By Zain Shauk | January 15, 2009
A herd of goats took over a hill above Glendale Community College on Wednesday. Drivers came to sudden stops on a hillside road as they spotted the creatures, often uncertain about what appeared to be a new grazing location for the 150 animals. The goats were part of a new, “green” approach to fire prevention and trimming flammable shrubbery, said Dan Padilla, the college’s director of facilities. “We got the idea that the goats were innovative,” Padilla said.
NEWS
December 27, 2003
Robert Chacon Pasadena Humane Society officials are investigating the death of two goats discovered Friday on a residential hillside. A third goat was in serious condition and not expected to live, humane society spokeswoman Ricky Whitman said Friday. "Either weather, disease or starvation could have killed the goats," Whitman said. "We are investigating the cause of death." The goats were part of a 500-head herd that has been used since September to thin Glendale hillsides of underbrush as a fire-prevention measure, humane society and Glendale Fire Department officials confirmed.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Darleene Barrientos Workers in the city's new four-legged division have a reputation for being gruff, and for spending a lot of time chewing over their tasks. They, on the other hand, might prefer to be described simply as being focused on their work. But here's one thing everyone can agree on: These new employees are real animals. As soon as next week, hillside residents could see goats wandering around their homes, munching on brush and weeds.
NEWS
January 7, 2004
Robert Chacon Preliminary results of necropsies conducted on two goats found dead on a residential Glendale hillside Dec. 26 show no signs of disease. One of the goats died from pneumonia, Pasadena Humane Society spokeswoman Ricky Whitman said. The death of the second goat is still under investigation. About 500 goats were contracted from EZ Bar Ranch in Tehachapi by the city in September to thin hillsides of underbrush as a fire prevention measure.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
Darleene Barrientos The city might soon have a new set of employees. They wouldn't be too demanding in the benefits department, but they have a reputation for being a bit gruff. The Glendale Fire Department is considering using goats to clear some areas of the city susceptible to wildfire. The "controlled-goat-grazing" project is aimed at creating what fire officials call defensible space -- a zone between native chaparral and the community.
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LOCAL
By Zain Shauk | January 15, 2009
A herd of goats took over a hill above Glendale Community College on Wednesday. Drivers came to sudden stops on a hillside road as they spotted the creatures, often uncertain about what appeared to be a new grazing location for the 150 animals. The goats were part of a new, “green” approach to fire prevention and trimming flammable shrubbery, said Dan Padilla, the college’s director of facilities. “We got the idea that the goats were innovative,” Padilla said.
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FEATURES
July 31, 2008
Sleeping giant facing early death Recently one of our councilmen admitted that if they voted for a strong smoking ban in Glendale it might mean facing a sleeping giant at re-election time (“Smoke ban is facing critics,” Monday). Well, I’m not a doctor, but by the amount of discarded cigarette butts and cigarette packages on our streets and sidewalks I have to believe the councilman’s sleeping giant is on his way to an early death by lung cancer or heart failure.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | July 1, 2008
Kindergartners scampered around inside a temporary pen Wednesday on the front lawn of Mark Keppel Elementary School. They inhabited the fenced-off area for close to an hour with animals of many shapes, sizes and textures. The visiting creatures were from Giddy Up Ranch in Acton, Calif., a petting zoo that brings animals on visits to schools, state fairs and birthday parties. Keppel kindergarten teachers invited the petting zoo to visit the school to give students an up-close look at animals, teacher Suzanne Buckhoff said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanna Linkchorst | June 21, 2008
I am lucky to have an artistic friend who is very hip and likes to tell me about the good, new places in town. One day, he eagerly told me about a night out with his wife to Three Drunken Goats. He was impressed with how they really knew what they were doing. And the bacon-wrapped dates, he said, were amazing. So I decided to try lunch. A companion and I were greeted and seated warmly by Graciela, a woman who loves her job if ever there was a woman who loved her job. Though born in Argentina, she studied up on Spanish tapas.
LOCAL
By Sevan Gatsby | April 4, 2008
Tuesday was a ?b-a-a-a-a-d? day to be a troll at Monte Vista Elementary School. The school?s first graders performed the classic tale ?Three Nanny Goats Gruff,? a musical produced and directed by teachers Shirley Sycamore and Sharon McCutcheon. Narrated by Trang Spero, the presentation was an adaptation of the traditional Norwegian fairy tale about three goats who need to cross a bridge to get food, but a fearsome troll who lives under the bridge tries to prevent their passage There were three performances throughout the day to accomodate friends and family.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | April 2, 2008
While singing an aria Tuesday, 7-year-old Katelyn Blood reflected on her life and how she would miss her friends after she had moved on to greener pastures. She lamented about the pleasant sound of the bumblebees she would leave behind, and the lovely sight of the butterflies she had grown up with. But she knew she had to leave her home — the grass that she ate for sustenance was growing thin — so she ventured across a nearby bridge, even though she had already been warned that a mean and hungry troll lived below it. Katelyn’s solo was part of her role as Fanny Goat, one of three title characters in an opera called the “Three Nanny Goats Gruff,” which first-graders performed Tuesday at Monte Vista Elementary School.
LOCAL
By Robert S. Hong | October 26, 2006
Several dozen hungry goats grazed through the Verdugo woodlands Wednesday morning, chomping on brush and making short work of the vegetation lining the hills. Their morning snack was part of the Glendale Fire Department's brush-clearing program. "This is one of the tools we use," Fire Capt. Jim Frawley said of the goats. "It's important that we have this vegetation management." With dense plant life covering the hills directly behind hundreds of homes, creating a barrier between dry vegetation and homes in case of a fire is essential, Frawley said.
FEATURES
By Chris Wiebe | July 31, 2006
The side lawn of the Central Library was transformed into a tidy barnyard on Saturday as a laid-back band of farm animals set up camp in Glendale. And where animals roam, children are sure to follow ? which is just what library staff intended, to attract children to the library during the summer as a part of the Summer Reading Program. Two pygmy goats, two alpacas, two chickens and a smattering of ducks and bunnies composed a handy rural backdrop for entertainers Sandy Walker and Barbara Leone, who introduced each animal with a lively jingle.
NEWS
October 27, 2004
Glendale Firefighters deployed some unusual help Tuesday in the Whiting Woods hills. The department sent 400 goats from Lakeview, Ore., to graze on sumac and sage brush in the 16-acre area. The state-funded program, in its second year in the city, helps eliminate potential danger and fires caused by people working to clear the area. "It's a natural way to clear the brush that is to everyone's advantage," said Capt. Carlos Guerrero, the department's spokesman.
NEWS
April 8, 2004
Who knew goats could be so elegant? The goats are here! The goats are here! Perhaps I'm a little too excited about a bunch of omnivorous quadrupeds, but the goats are here! For those of you who missed the story on page A6, Descanso Gardens has brought in a herd of goats to clear out the overgrown brush on the hillsides above the gardens. The goats arrived last week and started their duties Saturday. The idea is that goats eat everything, so they'll happily eat brush, shrubbery and anything else that could provide fuel for wildfires.
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