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NEWS
November 29, 2010
I read with dismay Dan Kimber's column supporting a ban on plastic bags ("Education Matters: Antonovich's arguments are short-sighted," Nov. 26). I am disappointed only one of the five county supervisors resisted the left's relentless interference with our lives. A government that can decide whether you can smoke in your own apartment, what days you can water your plants, and the material your grocer bags your purchases in can eventually determine every other aspect of our lives.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
In regards to the editorial “Smoking issue will linger for a while,” Sept. 29: Without government getting involved in any way, people can decide by themselves if they want to live in non-smoking apartments or hang out in smoke-filled dive bars. Every time citizens cede such choices the government becomes more intrusive, powerful and expensive. Unless we want politicians like Dave Weaver to also run every other aspect of our lives, we should vote for politicians this November who believe in limited government.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
I read in the News-Press an article (“Smoking restrictions back to dais,” Sept. 25) about the Glendale City Council considering a law that would make it a violation to smoke in your apartment. I do not see why this a government problem. When someone rents or leases an apartment they sign a contract. If in that contract is says “no smoking,” they agree to it with a signature. It is the duty of the landlord, not the government, to enforce that agreement. If someone who lives next door does not like that person smoking in their own home then they should notify the landlord, not some government agency.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman For Libertarian Randall Weissbuch, it isn't whether he wins or loses -- his main goal of running for congress in November is to get his message across. Voters in the 26th Congressional District, which includes La Crescenta, Montrose and La Canada Flintridge -- will choose between Weissbuch, who is a physician; incumbent Rep. David Dreier (R-Covina); and Democrat Marjorie Musser Mikels, a constitutional attorney from Upland. Weissbuch, 59, said his philosophy is aligned closely with that of the Libertarian platform.
NEWS
October 30, 2004
Lost among the statewide propositions concerning Indian gaming and the greater national race for the presidency of the United States is a little known proposed amendment to the state's Constitution known as Proposition 59. While it has been overshadowed by bigger and sexier campaigns, the truth is this initiative strikes a blow against those who would deny the people's right to know what government is doing. Proposition 59's passage would strengthen the Ralph M. Brown Act and the California Public Records Act and make it the state constitutional right for the public and journalists, acting on behalf of the public, to access governmental meetings and governmental documents.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert, max.zimbert@latimes.com | August 12, 2010
For the next year, Clark Magnet High School government teacher Edit Khachatryan is getting a civics lesson of her own. As one of five Teaching Ambassador Fellows at the U.S. Department of Education, Khachatryan is living, eating and breathing policy. She's in congressional meetings and hearings one day, and think-tank sessions and policy deliberations the next. And this is just her first month in the Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development. "I'm in an office that works with Capitol Hill, and basically all the stakeholders, to make laws and policy happen," she said.
NEWS
October 31, 2000
America needs the Libertarian Party if we want to protect our personal liberties and economic freedoms. The presidential debates made it clear that Bush wants to expand government programs, while Gore wants toexpand them more rapidly. Campaign flyers from Rogan and Schiff show that each wants to expand the role of government in our lives. For those who believe in less government, the choice is not the Republican Party. It has been in control of Congress for six years, and government has grown steadily each year.
NEWS
April 20, 2000
I don't know why it seems that liberal Democrats like state Sen. Adam Schiff always go to big government agencies to solve problems that are best handled at the local level. Point being the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport issue. While he tries to get things from big government agencies that we're not going to get anyway, Schiff continually seems to snub his nose at the power of the people. Probably thinking as most liberals do, that government knows what is best for the people.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
I'd like to thank all the people and volunteers over the years that help save and run the Alex Theatre. What upsets me is that the state of California can take it away and sell it. We the people of Glendale and taxpayers to the state of California have paid for the Alex. People are the government and I think we forget that power. I made my opinion simple, instead of complex, like our government in California has become. We need to get back to simple government or lose what we have.
NEWS
September 3, 2001
It appears that the editorial board of the Glendale News-Press needs a lesson in basic American civics as much as the denizens of City Hall. The "principle" behind the Design Review Board's "claim" on Mr. and Mrs. Fleitas' house -- which the editorial board of the News-Press accepts -- is simply this: The individual and his property, belong to the group, the tribe, the city, the state. It is the group which determines what the individual may do. In other words, the individual lives at the permission of society.
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NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | March 27, 2014
Students from Clark Magnet High School emerged as the winners of this year's Smart-a-Thon, a trivia tournament and fundraiser put on by the Crescenta Valley Chamber of Commerce. Thirty-four sponsored teams of four people each representing local businesses, schools and government offices went head to head once again at the Verdugo Hills Hospital Wednesday to see if they knew what was Idaho's nickname or how many different five-card poker hands could be dealt from a 52-card deck. "It's kind of a bragging rights-type thing to win … it's just fun that way, but everyone kind of takes it seriously," said Steve Pierce, chamber president and business ambassador for the Montrose Shopping Park Assn.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | February 5, 2014
Franklin Magnet Elementary and Toll Middle School received a significant honor this week with an announcement from the Spanish government naming the schools international academies. That designation was awarded by Spain's ministry of education, culture and sport and announced during Tuesday's school board meeting by Rosario Outes Jimenez, the education adviser for the consulate general of Spain. Jimenez observed both schools' Spanish classes over the last school year, looking, she said, for quality instruction and students' promising academic results.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
This is solely my personal opinion and not the opinion of the U.S. Attorney's Office or the U.S. Department of Justice. I wish I were working for you today. Normally I am an assistant U.S. attorney in the Civil Fraud Section of the U.S. Attorney's Office; and within the last 12 months I have been the lead lawyer for the United States in three cases that recovered more than $55 million, cases that involved healthcare fraud against the government and environmental damage to the National Forests.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 1, 2013
The partial federal government shutdown is being hotly contested in Washington D.C., but its impacts will be felt locally, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) said Tuesday - the first day many federal workers were furloughed. The shutdown came about when the House of Representatives failed to pass a bill authorizing the federal government to fund its budget. Republican members of the House have proposed a spending bill with amendments that would strip out already-budgeted funding for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or delay key portions of the healthcare reform bill, moves which the Democrat-controlled Senate will not pass.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
The Mars rover Curiosity won't be left in park on the Red Planet this week, but no updates about the mission will be tweeted. Scientists and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge are reporting to work despite the partial federal government shutdown that took effect on Tuesday, JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said. Curiosity and other missions that the center manages, including another Mars rover - - Opportunity --- and two Mars orbiters, are not currently impacted.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
As a government shutdown looms to possibly begin at midnight (EST) Monday, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) said it would adversely impact the economy and blamed Republicans in Congress who have "once again created a crisis that has put America's fiscal health in jeopardy - this time over their fervor" to defund or delay Obamacare. “A shutdown would be a self-inflicted wound on an economy still struggling to recover,” Schiff, who also represents Glendale, said in a statement. “ If Congress can't take measures to affirmatively create jobs and support the recovery, it should at least get out of the way. We must cease these political games over the nation's budget and the endless rounds of legislative brinksmanship.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
Many government meetings are broadcast live and archived with a vast array of official records posted online. Mainstream media may be on financial life support, but more than half the adult population still reads a newspaper daily, in print or digital form, as part of their news overload from radio and TV and their blogosphere favorites. We've never been so well-informed - or so cynical about our government and society. Evidence of this is the long-term decline in voting, even with mail-in ballots.
NEWS
By Ron Kaye | March 16, 2013
One of my first impressions when I called the San Fernando Valley my home nearly 30 years ago was that this vast middle-class enclave suffered from a bad inferiority complex, like it was populated by a lot of Rodney Dangerfields who just couldn't get respect. Respect - or the lack of it - is still pretty much the problem, through the failed secession movement and derailed efforts to make local government more responsive. The last vestige of a reform to change that is the San Fernando Valley Council of Governments, a little-known and largely ignored three-year-old, quasi-governmental body that brings together the county, the city of Los Angeles and the cities of Glendale, Burbank, San Fernando and Santa Clarita.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
The U.S. government, the largest purveyor of loans to colleges, does absolutely nothing to try to reduce the cost of the tuition they pay for on behalf of the student debtor. Our government should negotiate tuition by stating to any given college that their debtor will go elsewhere unless they lower the cost. The government would be able to dictate in part such change in lowering tuition because of its enormous buying power of education. Such is done in the medical industry through Medicare/Medicaid, and such can be done in the educational arena.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
I read in the News-Press an article (“Smoking restrictions back to dais,” Sept. 25) about the Glendale City Council considering a law that would make it a violation to smoke in your apartment. I do not see why this a government problem. When someone rents or leases an apartment they sign a contract. If in that contract is says “no smoking,” they agree to it with a signature. It is the duty of the landlord, not the government, to enforce that agreement. If someone who lives next door does not like that person smoking in their own home then they should notify the landlord, not some government agency.
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