Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsGrades
IN THE NEWS

Grades

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | May 13, 2011
If Jesse Rodriguez had dropped out of high school, no one would have been surprised. Born in East Los Angeles, he moved to Glendale in his early teens and struggled at one school after another. There were suspensions, arrests and failing grades. But then something clicked. “One day, I just thought to myself, ‘What if I have kids one day?’” Rodriguez said. “I would like to have a family and be able to support them.” He enrolled at Allan Daily High School — a site designed to meet the needs of struggling students —and his grades soared.
NEWS
January 17, 2004
Gary Moskowitz Daily High School English teacher Jon Livingston wasn't surprised to learn that at least one of his students thinks of him as "an uptight version of Pee Wee Herman" who "needs to take a chill pill." If anything, seeing those comments recently on the website www.RateMyTeachers.com gave Livingston a good laugh, because he knew right away that the comments referred to one isolated incident and don't reflect his overall ability to teach.
NEWS
February 10, 2000
Paul M. Anderson GLENDALE -- When Jonathon Payne was in high school and his brother Chris in college, the two decided they wanted to be firefighters. The two Ventura natives even got a chance to work together on the Ventura County Fire Department. But now, little brother Jonathon is moving on. And although he won't be able to work with his brother anymore, he couldn't be happier. Jonathon Payne joined 15 other firefighter recruits who joyfully graduated from the Glendale-Burbank Joint Training Academy Wednesday after 12 weeks of grueling training.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
Last week, the Burbank Leader's front page photo showed a large group of Burbank High School students during ceremonies commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack on New York's Twin Towers. A military color guard was present and the national anthem was being played, according to the story line (“Students remember, learn about the Sept. 11 attacks,” Sept. 10). One student in front of the group was holding her right hand over her heart. The student to her left may also have been doing the same, but her hand was obscured by the color guard.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | December 15, 2006
There were no lights illuminating or cameras recording these acts, just dozens of wide-eyed school children and their appreciative teachers witnessing them. Ten Hoover High School drama students walked across the street to Mark Keppel Elementary School on Thursday to perform children's stories in front of first- through sixth-graders as part of a collaborative learning project. "If they're not laughing, they're bored," Hoover freshman Arlen Khachatourians, 14, said. The high-school students, a mix of freshmen through seniors, were chosen from drama teacher David Huber's two acting classes and given the chance to hone their acting skills as they read a variety of books, including "Too Many Tamales," "Little Red Hen," "Pierre: A Cautionary Tale" and "101 Dalmatians."
NEWS
March 9, 2000
Claudia Peschiutta DOWNTOWN -- Forget A's and F's. Forget the days when teachers bumped up grades for students who tried hard but didn't do well on their work. The Standards-Based Report on Pupil Progress being considered by the Glendale Board of Education would replace letter grades with separate numeric evaluations of academic performance and effort for elementary school students. "Now that we're talking about retention and an end to social promotion, a parent has to have all the right information along the way," said Alice Petrossian, assistant superintendent of educational services for the district.
NEWS
May 10, 2005
Robert Chacon Gone are the days of handing over the report card to Mom and Dad or trying to turn a failing grade into a B via careful penmanship. La Canada High School students' grades, attendance reports and other information will go online by the end of the week barring any serious concerns from school board members tonight. School district staff members, who have been working on a pilot program with teachers and parents, will present a public workshop tonight on the Pinnacle Gradebook system, a software program manufactured by Excelsior Software Inc. that allows student grades to be viewed online.
NEWS
By: Barbara Diamond | September 9, 2005
City officials pitched safety as the main reason to discourage street and driveway grades in excess of 12%. The City Council voted 4-0 on Tuesday to approve a Local Coastal Plan amendment requesting California Coastal Commission certification and to adopt an ordinance amendment. "In effect, this makes undeveloped hillsides de facto open space," property owner Paul Alione said. City Manager Ken Frank said the ordinance affects only driveways on buildable lots and does not alter the status of a legal building site.
NEWS
August 21, 2001
Tim Willert GLENDALE -- A national children's quality-of-life study released today gives Glendale high marks for public safety and community life, but average grades for education, economics and environment. The Kid-Friendly Report Card 2001, a biannual study conducted by the nonprofit environmental organization Zero Population Growth, gave Glendale a B- grade, and ranked the city 51st out of 74 component cities, or suburbs. A total of 239 cities nationwide were studied.
NEWS
May 1, 2000
Judy Seckler DOWNTOWN -- Accountability is one of those education buzz words most often heard on the lips of educators these days. Its meaning will be most apparent as the school board takes on an additional discussion of promotion and retention of middle school students at the school board meeting Tuesday. "For the first time the district is taking a very close look at the promotion requirements for middle school students and implementing tougher standards," District Spokesman Vic Pallos said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2014
Good morning, 818 readers. Today is Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014. The National Weather Service expects temperatures for the Glendale area to see a high around 62 and a low of 43. We're rounding up the top news headlines in your region: The Glendale City Council directed its staff this week to look into claims from a Glendale man who says he was stopped and interrogated by police four times in the past six months for a vehicle infraction for...
Advertisement
NEWS
By Brian Crosby | January 2, 2014
One of my favorite Christmas presents this year was from my wife, a box set of the classic TV show “Leave It to Beaver.” While the show is a situational comedy, what attracts me to it is the climatic moment that occurs in each episode when the father, Ward Cleaver, has a serious conversation with his boys, Wally and Theodore aka The Beaver. As the slow, serious music swells up on the soundtrack, the father gives parenting advice on a life lesson the boys have to learn. In fact, Joe Connelly and Bob Mosher, creators of the show, used their own adventures in parenthood as inspiration, which explains the truthfulness that resonates in the program.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
In a letter to the editor that was published Nov. 16, Don Mazen wrote that in 1950 La Cañada Jr. High School had grades 7 and 8, with grades 9 and 10 attending other junior highs in Pasadena until 1957. This is incorrect. La Cañada Jr. High included grades 7 through 10 when I attended it. I know because I graduated from 10th grade from this school in 1956. We then went to John Muir in Pasadena for grades 11 and 12. Jackie Steimke Glendale
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | July 20, 2013
Glendale Unified will slightly increase class sizes in first through third grades this coming school year to generate $1.1 million in ongoing savings. The school board approved the change, which will increase the average class sizes from 24 students to 26, this week. "Unfortunately, as a district, we're still dealing with a structural deficit," said Supt. Dick Sheehan, adding that the state's new funding formula for schools still posed questions for Glendale. The district will keep its transitional kindergarten classes for those who turn 5 between Oct. 2 and Dec. 2 at 24 students, along with its main kindergarten classes.
SPORTS
By Andrew Shortall, andrew.shortall@latimes.com | June 20, 2012
SOUTH PASADENA - There were a number of starters missing from the Crescenta Valley High girls' basketball team Wednesday, but that was by design. Falcons Coach Jason Perez made the summer-league meeting with Flintridge Prep an optional 'B-team game and still pulled out a 28-15 victory over a Rebels squad that played its first game under new co-coaches Kevin Kiyomura and Jayme Kiyomura-Chan. "These games are huge for us," said Perez of 'B'-team contests. "They allow kids that are only getting 10 or 12 minutes in regular varsity games to get 20, 25 minutes and they start getting a feel for varsity basketball - that's the importance of these.
NEWS
April 27, 2012
Letter writer Susan Bolan's comments, “Proposed 710 tunnel could be catastrophic,” are correct. The only sensible way to connect the 710 Freeway to the 210 Freeway is with a simple, relatively inexpensive, below-grade level section (not a tunnel) along the original route for which Caltrans purchased the property years ago. Hal Weber Glendale
NEWS
By Mark Kellam, mark.kellam@latimes.com | October 23, 2011
A “C” public health rating for the Walt Disney Co.'s commissary at its Buena Vista Street headquarters may be tied to the company's decision to discontinue the services of a third-party catering contractor. Without the contract, Lifeworks Restaurant Group, which operated the eatery, filed notices with the California Employment Development Department stating it will lay off its workers at Disney offices in Burbank and Glendale on Nov. 4. Lifeworks released a statement earlier this month, stating it will “no longer provide those services to this client location,” but Disney has so far declined to comment on the contract.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | September 19, 2011
Holy Family Grade School teacher Krikor Kiladjian on Monday led his eighth-grade students through a traditional social studies lesson in a very non-traditional fashion. They took turns at the front of the classroom, plugging in their iPads and walking each other through charts depicting various geographic regions that were projected onto a pull-down screen. Classmates followed along at their desks on their own devices. “It has been working really well,” Kiladjian said of integrating the iPads into course work.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
Last week, the Burbank Leader's front page photo showed a large group of Burbank High School students during ceremonies commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack on New York's Twin Towers. A military color guard was present and the national anthem was being played, according to the story line (“Students remember, learn about the Sept. 11 attacks,” Sept. 10). One student in front of the group was holding her right hand over her heart. The student to her left may also have been doing the same, but her hand was obscured by the color guard.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | May 13, 2011
If Jesse Rodriguez had dropped out of high school, no one would have been surprised. Born in East Los Angeles, he moved to Glendale in his early teens and struggled at one school after another. There were suspensions, arrests and failing grades. But then something clicked. “One day, I just thought to myself, ‘What if I have kids one day?’” Rodriguez said. “I would like to have a family and be able to support them.” He enrolled at Allan Daily High School — a site designed to meet the needs of struggling students —and his grades soared.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|