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Hanukkah

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NEWS
December 23, 2000
Michael Martinez GLENDALE -- To Karen Berg, the Hanukkah potluck dinner party Friday night at her home was the ultimate o7 tzedekahf7 , or altruism. "The party itself is really about just getting together, about celebrating our community," said Berg, 17, a Glendale High senior who organized the dinner. "It was something I really wanted to do for the congregation. Including several people from Burbank, about 40 to 50 members of Congregation Hugat Haverim -- which Berg's mother, Jacqueline Gish, said means "circle of friends" -- attended the dinner and the formal Hanukkah services that followed.
NEWS
December 15, 2001
Alecia Foster GLENDALE GALLERIA -- The community is invited to celebrate the last night of Hanukkah Sunday at the Glendale Galleria. The event, sponsored by Chabad Jewish Center of Glendale and Foothill, will feature the traditional lighting of the Menorah. During Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights, Jews commemorate the Maccabees' victory over the Syrians in 165 B.C. The lighting of the Menorah's candles is a reminder of what happened once the Jews took back the Temple of Jerusalem: one night's worth of oil for the holy lamps lasted them eight nights.
NEWS
By Robert S. Hong | December 15, 2006
As the last rays of the sun set this evening, the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah begins, marking eight days of celebration, gift-giving and reflection. The holiday occurs between the end of November and the end of December every year and celebrates important events in Jewish history. "In general this holiday has the most universal message — a message of light over darkness, freedom over oppression," said Rabbi Simcha Backman of the Chabad Jewish Center in Glendale. The history behind the celebration dates back more than 2,000 years to the victory of the Jewish army of the Maccabees over the Seleucid Empire, which had tried to make the Jews renounce their faith, said Rabbi Richard Schechter of Glendale Temple Sinai.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | December 22, 2008
Hebrew songs filled the air Sunday as Jews and non-Jews spun dreidels, made crafts and listened to stories to celebrate the start of Hanukkah at the Americana at Brand. The celebration, one of many to be held in both Glendale and Burbank during the eight days of Hanukkah, marked the start of the festive holiday with the lighting of the first lamp on a 12-foot electrical menorah, which was placed next to the shopping center’s fountain and near its 100-foot Christmas tree. “It’s the first time they’re doing this, which is really special, especially for the Jewish community,” said Rabbi Simcha Backman, of the Chabad Jewish Center of Glendale, adding that the Americana had organized the event as an attempt to reach out to the community and later invited the center to participate.
FEATURES
By Rachel Kane | December 18, 2006
Temple Sinai members had some special guests on Sunday evening for their annual Hanukkah dinner and celebration. Courtesy of the Disney Worldwide Outreach program, this year's festivities included a visit from Mickey and Minnie Mouse, DJ services from Radio Disney and Disney-related crafts and games. Disney Worldwide Outreach is the charitable end of the Disney corporation. Their volunteer staff visits about a dozen holiday parties every year, said Jamie Keyser, senior communication relations representative for Disney Worldwide Outreach in the greater Los Angeles area.
FEATURES
By Chris Wiebe | December 4, 2007
Jews across the globe will light the first candle on the menorah at sundown today, as the eight-day Hanukkah season begins. And when the Glendale Galleria closes its doors for the day, members of the Chabad Jewish Center of Glendale will set up a large-scale menorah, which will be on display throughout Hanukkah. Putting the menorah on public display is a way to demonstrate the holiday’s universal theme of peace and goodwill among Jews and non-Jews, said Rabbi Simcha Backman, of the Glendale Chabad.
NEWS
December 3, 2004
Rosette Gonzales Temple Sinai of Glendale will resonate with the sounds of celebration Sunday as the adult and youth choirs and the youth orchestra performs their pre-Hanukkah concert. Cantor Mariana Gindlin will offer an eight-part seasonal message through music as she conducts the choirs and orchestra during a 90-minute performance, starting at 3 p.m. "Each one of the candles is going to represent one theme, one thing that we want to high- light from Hanukkah, from the spirit of the holiday," she said.
NEWS
December 22, 2003
Most Jewish holidays are celebrated in one of two places, the home or the synagogue. But Hanukkah is not like most Jewish holidays, at least not according to Rabbi Simcha Backman of Chabad of Glendale and the Foothill Communities. Sunday afternoon, a large crowd -- both Jews and non-Jews -- celebrated the third night of Hanukkah at the Glendale Galleria with latkes, Jewish songs and the lighting of a menorah. "The message of Hanukkah is not just a Jewish one, it's a universal one," Backman said.
FEATURES
By By Fred Ortega | December 28, 2005
Temple Sinai holds its annual Hanukkah celebration in honor of victory of the Macabees.NORTHWEST GLENDALE -- Hanukkah is typically observed at home, with close family and friends. But on Tuesday, home was Temple Sinai and family was about 110 members of the local Jewish community. Temple Sinai's annual Hanukkah festivities have been celebrated for at least 30 years, said Phillip Hain, a member of the temple's board of directors. The celebration on Tuesday featured the lighting of the third candle in the menorah -- Tuesday was the third day of the Festival of Lights -- and the singing of the motzi, a blessing over bread traditionally said before the Hanukkah meal.
NEWS
December 2, 2002
Janine Marnien Among thousands of shoppers looking for Christmas gifts for friends and family, local Jews gathered at the Glendale Galleria honoring another religious tradition that is part of the holiday season. With the lighting of the menorah and other Hanukkah festivities, they celebrated an anniversary that has symbolized perseverance and freedom for more than 2,000 years. But the event was not just for Jews, said Rabbi Simcha Backman of the Chabad Jewish Center of Glendale and the Foothill Communities, the organization sponsoring Sunday's event.
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NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | December 14, 2009
Betty Ross has spent the past few nights with her family and close friends, which has made Hanukkah an already joyous celebration for her. On Friday, the first night of Hanukkah, Ross and her family lit the first candle of their menorah, played with a dreidel, ate potato latkes and opened gifts, she said. But Ross said the highlight of celebrating Hanukkah is being with her daughter and granddaughter. In an effort to extend family time, the Tarzana resident took her granddaughter to the Americana at Brand on Sunday to celebrate Hanukkah, the eight-day Festival of Lights celebrated by Jews around the world.
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NEWS
By Christopher Cadelago | December 11, 2009
DOWNTOWN — Hanukkah, the eight-day Festival of Lights celebrated by Israelis and Jews around the world, begins at sundown Friday. Families across the region will gather to light one candle of the menorah and recite blessings to God to commemorate an improbable victory over invaders who debased the temple in Jerusalem. Hanukkah this year begins and ends on the Jewish Sabbath, requiring minor liturgical changes. Still, holiday traditions of candles, gifts and jelly doughnuts will stay the same.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
Winter. The days grow dark. The nights grow long and yet This is the season of light. There are many ways to approach the subject of Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday made ubiquitous in America by its proximity to the Christian celebration. What keeps this holiday going? Is it the food? The potato pancakes ( latkes ) or the special doughnuts ( sufganiot )? Is it the presents? The game with a top ( dreidl )? Is it the Hebrew songs like Mao Tzur (“Rock of Ages”)
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | December 22, 2008
Hebrew songs filled the air Sunday as Jews and non-Jews spun dreidels, made crafts and listened to stories to celebrate the start of Hanukkah at the Americana at Brand. The celebration, one of many to be held in both Glendale and Burbank during the eight days of Hanukkah, marked the start of the festive holiday with the lighting of the first lamp on a 12-foot electrical menorah, which was placed next to the shopping center’s fountain and near its 100-foot Christmas tree. “It’s the first time they’re doing this, which is really special, especially for the Jewish community,” said Rabbi Simcha Backman, of the Chabad Jewish Center of Glendale, adding that the Americana had organized the event as an attempt to reach out to the community and later invited the center to participate.
FEATURES
By Chris Wiebe | December 4, 2007
Jews across the globe will light the first candle on the menorah at sundown today, as the eight-day Hanukkah season begins. And when the Glendale Galleria closes its doors for the day, members of the Chabad Jewish Center of Glendale will set up a large-scale menorah, which will be on display throughout Hanukkah. Putting the menorah on public display is a way to demonstrate the holiday’s universal theme of peace and goodwill among Jews and non-Jews, said Rabbi Simcha Backman, of the Glendale Chabad.
FEATURES
By Rachel Kane | December 18, 2006
Temple Sinai members had some special guests on Sunday evening for their annual Hanukkah dinner and celebration. Courtesy of the Disney Worldwide Outreach program, this year's festivities included a visit from Mickey and Minnie Mouse, DJ services from Radio Disney and Disney-related crafts and games. Disney Worldwide Outreach is the charitable end of the Disney corporation. Their volunteer staff visits about a dozen holiday parties every year, said Jamie Keyser, senior communication relations representative for Disney Worldwide Outreach in the greater Los Angeles area.
NEWS
By Robert S. Hong | December 15, 2006
As the last rays of the sun set this evening, the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah begins, marking eight days of celebration, gift-giving and reflection. The holiday occurs between the end of November and the end of December every year and celebrates important events in Jewish history. "In general this holiday has the most universal message — a message of light over darkness, freedom over oppression," said Rabbi Simcha Backman of the Chabad Jewish Center in Glendale. The history behind the celebration dates back more than 2,000 years to the victory of the Jewish army of the Maccabees over the Seleucid Empire, which had tried to make the Jews renounce their faith, said Rabbi Richard Schechter of Glendale Temple Sinai.
FEATURES
By By Fred Ortega | December 28, 2005
Temple Sinai holds its annual Hanukkah celebration in honor of victory of the Macabees.NORTHWEST GLENDALE -- Hanukkah is typically observed at home, with close family and friends. But on Tuesday, home was Temple Sinai and family was about 110 members of the local Jewish community. Temple Sinai's annual Hanukkah festivities have been celebrated for at least 30 years, said Phillip Hain, a member of the temple's board of directors. The celebration on Tuesday featured the lighting of the third candle in the menorah -- Tuesday was the third day of the Festival of Lights -- and the singing of the motzi, a blessing over bread traditionally said before the Hanukkah meal.
NEWS
December 3, 2004
Rosette Gonzales Temple Sinai of Glendale will resonate with the sounds of celebration Sunday as the adult and youth choirs and the youth orchestra performs their pre-Hanukkah concert. Cantor Mariana Gindlin will offer an eight-part seasonal message through music as she conducts the choirs and orchestra during a 90-minute performance, starting at 3 p.m. "Each one of the candles is going to represent one theme, one thing that we want to high- light from Hanukkah, from the spirit of the holiday," she said.
NEWS
December 22, 2003
Most Jewish holidays are celebrated in one of two places, the home or the synagogue. But Hanukkah is not like most Jewish holidays, at least not according to Rabbi Simcha Backman of Chabad of Glendale and the Foothill Communities. Sunday afternoon, a large crowd -- both Jews and non-Jews -- celebrated the third night of Hanukkah at the Glendale Galleria with latkes, Jewish songs and the lighting of a menorah. "The message of Hanukkah is not just a Jewish one, it's a universal one," Backman said.
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