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Hexavalent Chromium

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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 14, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) increased pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday to issue a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans, calling the slow progress “unconscionable.” In his letter to U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, the congressman whose district has a long-running problem with chromium 6 contamination of underground water said the agency “must stop wasting time...
NEWS
By Jason Wells | June 21, 2008
GLENDALE — Chromium 6 remains the city’s most problematic contaminant in underground water supplies, according to Glendale Water & Power’s water quality report for 2007. The report, to be mailed to customers beginning Tuesday, details the level of contaminants detected in Glendale’s water supply based on thousands of tests taken throughout 2007. With levels of industrial chromium 6 contamination below five parts per billion citywide, it does not pose a health risk, officials said, but it continues to be a source of worry for the region as state officials develop a potentially “very low” threshold for the toxic element in local water supplies.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich today slammed public health officials for “pathetic bureaucratic inertia” in establishing new maximum allowed levels of chromium-6 in public drinking water. The California Department of Public Health and state EPA have been working for years to establish a new “maximum contaminant level” for hexavalent chromium, which is known to cause cancer, but Antonovich said the process has been too slow. Chromium-6 is currently regulated at under the 50-micrograms per liter, but in 2011, a proposal was submitted to reduce that to 0.02- micrograms per liter.
NEWS
By Richard Verrier and Chip Jacobs, Los Angeles Times | August 22, 2012
Federal and state regulators are investigating whether a vintage air conditioning system at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank played a role in contaminating groundwater with chromium 6, a cancer-causing heavy metal widely used in aerospace manufacturing and other industries. A consultant hired by the Environmental Protection Agency recently identified the Disney property among a list of facilities being “investigated as potential sources of chromium contamination in groundwater,” according to an April 2012 report recently posted on the agency's website.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | March 26, 2008
GLENDALE — A $2-million state grant to help fund two pilot chromium 6 treatment facilities in Glendale has been approved, filling a major funding hole in the cross-jurisdictional effort to remove the toxic element from local aquifers, water officials said. Glendale Water & Power officials received a letter of commitment from the state Department of Water Resources late last week, and are planning to officially announce the funding boost later this week. “Up until now we were looking to a promise — at this point, we have a guarantee,” said Peter Kavounas, water service administrator for the utility.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 14, 2011
Glendale Water & Power plans to spend another $550,000 on a research project for stripping cancer-causing chromium 6 from local groundwater that already has cost $7.8 million. City officials say they need to make the expenditure because the current removal method has some drawbacks and the state may tighten restrictions. The additional funding comes from a coalition of stakeholders as California officials consider tightening restrictions on how much of the toxic element - already at 50 parts per billion - is allowed in potable water.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 15, 2014
After receiving 18,000 comments, the California Department of Public Health on Tuesday recommended setting the maximum limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, bringing the new cap on the pollutant that has plagued Glendale water for decades one step closer to finalization. The recommendation is expected to be approved within 30 days by an administrative arm of the state government, known as the Office of Administrative Law, according to a statement released by the public health department.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 13, 2012
For the first time, a Glendale research team testing methods for stripping chromium 6 from groundwater has released an estimate for how much it will cost long term - putting the tab at up to $27 million over 20 years. The costs will be a key consideration for the California Department of Public Health, which plans to use the more than 10 years of research carried out by Glendale Water & Power to set a new maximum contaminant level for cancer-causing hexavalent chromium. In doing so, state officials must consider the costs and technical feasibility.
NEWS
May 30, 2001
"Fence or offense" on May 22 draws a simple picture of a complex contemporary issue that demands a thoughtful and practical approach -- which the current City Council and Planning Department are to be commended for taking for the first time in many years. That simplification, accompanied by an invitation for letters from readers, would fuel a now mythic tussle citywide between well-intentioned property owners seeking security, safety, privacy -- and yes, an attractive and unoffensive landscaping amenity -- versus fence opponents who fear that it is the "one issue that will affect the quality of life in Glendale forever," to quote a northwest Glendale resident who spoke at the May 15 council accompanied by equally intense board members from the Northwest Homeowners Assn.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 15, 2014
After receiving 18,000 comments, the California Department of Public Health on Tuesday recommended setting the maximum limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, bringing the new cap on the pollutant that has plagued Glendale water for decades one step closer to finalization. The recommendation is expected to be approved within 30 days by an administrative arm of the state government, known as the Office of Administrative Law, according to a statement released by the public health department.
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NEWS
By Richard Verrier and Chip Jacobs, Los Angeles Times | August 22, 2012
Federal and state regulators are investigating whether a vintage air conditioning system at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank played a role in contaminating groundwater with chromium 6, a cancer-causing heavy metal widely used in aerospace manufacturing and other industries. A consultant hired by the Environmental Protection Agency recently identified the Disney property among a list of facilities being “investigated as potential sources of chromium contamination in groundwater,” according to an April 2012 report recently posted on the agency's website.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 13, 2012
For the first time, a Glendale research team testing methods for stripping chromium 6 from groundwater has released an estimate for how much it will cost long term - putting the tab at up to $27 million over 20 years. The costs will be a key consideration for the California Department of Public Health, which plans to use the more than 10 years of research carried out by Glendale Water & Power to set a new maximum contaminant level for cancer-causing hexavalent chromium. In doing so, state officials must consider the costs and technical feasibility.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 14, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) increased pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday to issue a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans, calling the slow progress “unconscionable.” In his letter to U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, the congressman whose district has a long-running problem with chromium 6 contamination of underground water said the agency “must stop wasting time...
NEWS
February 21, 2012
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich today slammed public health officials for “pathetic bureaucratic inertia” in establishing new maximum allowed levels of chromium-6 in public drinking water. The California Department of Public Health and state EPA have been working for years to establish a new “maximum contaminant level” for hexavalent chromium, which is known to cause cancer, but Antonovich said the process has been too slow. Chromium-6 is currently regulated at under the 50-micrograms per liter, but in 2011, a proposal was submitted to reduce that to 0.02- micrograms per liter.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 14, 2011
Glendale Water & Power plans to spend another $550,000 on a research project for stripping cancer-causing chromium 6 from local groundwater that already has cost $7.8 million. City officials say they need to make the expenditure because the current removal method has some drawbacks and the state may tighten restrictions. The additional funding comes from a coalition of stakeholders as California officials consider tightening restrictions on how much of the toxic element - already at 50 parts per billion - is allowed in potable water.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | June 21, 2008
GLENDALE — Chromium 6 remains the city’s most problematic contaminant in underground water supplies, according to Glendale Water & Power’s water quality report for 2007. The report, to be mailed to customers beginning Tuesday, details the level of contaminants detected in Glendale’s water supply based on thousands of tests taken throughout 2007. With levels of industrial chromium 6 contamination below five parts per billion citywide, it does not pose a health risk, officials said, but it continues to be a source of worry for the region as state officials develop a potentially “very low” threshold for the toxic element in local water supplies.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | March 26, 2008
GLENDALE — A $2-million state grant to help fund two pilot chromium 6 treatment facilities in Glendale has been approved, filling a major funding hole in the cross-jurisdictional effort to remove the toxic element from local aquifers, water officials said. Glendale Water & Power officials received a letter of commitment from the state Department of Water Resources late last week, and are planning to officially announce the funding boost later this week. “Up until now we were looking to a promise — at this point, we have a guarantee,” said Peter Kavounas, water service administrator for the utility.
NEWS
May 30, 2001
"Fence or offense" on May 22 draws a simple picture of a complex contemporary issue that demands a thoughtful and practical approach -- which the current City Council and Planning Department are to be commended for taking for the first time in many years. That simplification, accompanied by an invitation for letters from readers, would fuel a now mythic tussle citywide between well-intentioned property owners seeking security, safety, privacy -- and yes, an attractive and unoffensive landscaping amenity -- versus fence opponents who fear that it is the "one issue that will affect the quality of life in Glendale forever," to quote a northwest Glendale resident who spoke at the May 15 council accompanied by equally intense board members from the Northwest Homeowners Assn.
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