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NEWS
March 31, 2011
I was immensely pleased to read in a recent Glendale News-Press column that someone was motivated to criticize in writing the parking meters on Brand Boulevard (“Unclassified Info: Turning against the tyranny of the meters,” March 22). I’m sure a lot of people don’t like them, but with everything else going on, they simply haven’t been able to muster the energy to complain about one more irritating inconvenience. Yet Gary Huerta did a beautiful job of it. As far as I’m concerned, the city might as well have painted all the curbs red on Brand Boulevard.
NEWS
October 11, 2008
Unity — it’s something this community could really use. Chasms are dividing this city that need to be bridged — some shallow, some incredibly deep. People seem to let the slightest thing divide them — ethnicity, where they live in the city, smoking, politics, socioeconomics. And these are slight things, but we make them big deals. We are all guilty on some level, on some issue. Even those of us who cry foul need to take a closer look at ourselves.
THE818NOW
By Brian Crosby | September 28, 2011
Since this week is Banned Books Week, and since one of my colleagues over at Glendale High School is fighting for Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" to be approved as a book to teach to advanced 11th grade English students, I thought I'd share with you my experience with banned books. When looking back on the books I've taught over the years, I realize that most of them have been banned in some part of the United States at some time.  Here are the “corrupted” books I've exposed young children to:  Erich Maria Remarque's "All Quiet on the Western Front," Richard Wright's "Black Boy," John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" and "Of Mice and Men," Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist," Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451," Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," and, of course that book of dubious merit, Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
Ani Amirkhanian His friends call him "Morty." But Glendale resident Larry Thomlinson prefers to be called a "funeral director" instead of mortician, a title people tend to associate with the macabre, he said. Thomlinson is the president of Transitions Funeral Service, a full-service mortuary in Glendale that coordinates funeral arrangements in the comfort of one's home. The 62-year-old Oklahoma native has been in the funeral-directing business for 20 years.
NEWS
February 16, 2001
I have been reading the many letters that have run in the paper the past few weeks responding to both Paul Carney's original letter and his apology. I think that most of us would agree that it is sad that so much anger and conflict exists between the members of our community, but I also think that most of us can honestly say that it is not a surprise. We all know people who will say (including ourselves) that there is something wrong with "those people," whoever "those people" may be -- Armenian, Hispanic, White, Asian, rich, poor, young, old, etc. And although we wish that the circumstances were different, the truth is that there is tremendous stress and conflict in our community among the many diverse people who live here.
NEWS
By KIMBERLIE ZAKARIAN | January 17, 2009
As I write, I just finished helping one of my daughters master her multiplication (I pray!), did several loads of laundry, cleaned up after another daughter with the stomach flu, and cleaned the stove after my sick son asked for soup. In the middle of the storm, I tried to sneak moments of calm to call back a few patients I needed to reschedule. I know we can all relate to days like these whether we have children or not. As I reflect on the day, for some reason I say it was ?a good day.?
NEWS
March 11, 2002
Gary Moskowitz NORTHWEST GLENDALE -- More than 600 single men and women came to Glendale Sunday with the hope of meeting somebody new. At a singles' conference Sunday afternoon in the grand ballroom of the Hilton Glendale, guests like Jeanine DiCesaris were able to ask questions about dating, marriage, family, romance and love. DiCesaris, 22, of Brea, Orange County, wanted advice on how to deal with family when they don't approve of a boyfriend.
FEATURES
By Alison Kjeldgaard | January 21, 2009
In a nation where child obesity is on the rise, and more and more schools are losing the funds to provide fitness programs for their students, YMCAs across the nation have remained an important part of their respective communities. Ryan Nakota, the director of wellness at the YMCA of Glendale, acknowledges the importance of leading a healthy lifestyle, both mentally and physically. Nakota grew up in Hawaii, where he graduated from the University of Hawaii. He proceeded to become a fitness instructor there, teaching students ranging in age from 4 1/2 to 13. He coached baseball, soccer and girls’ softball before moving to Los Angeles in 1978.
NEWS
April 16, 2004
DAN KIMBER This is a follow-up to my last installment about a learning simulation that involves kids creating a new world. Every parent, at one time or another, has uttered the following phrase to a teenage daughter or son: "Just try to put yourself in my shoes." The reaction from their child almost always involves rolled eyeballs or looks of incomprehension that say, "I won't, I can't." For many youngsters, it is an unimaginable thing. But we teachers are experienced at getting kids to role-play.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | May 29, 2009
My very favorite week of the teaching year is the one following the Advanced Placement test given to my students. For five days, I sit back and observe, without uttering a word, while each class uses the time to fashion a new world. Earth has been destroyed in a thermonuclear war, and this particular group (each class) was rocketed to a new planet, Larbo, which is Earth-like in all ways. Before they can set foot on their new home, however, they must all agree on a number of issues involving government, society, family, rights, religion, crime and punishment, leadership, etc. If after five days they cannot come to agreement, they perish.
ARTICLES BY DATE
THE818NOW
By Brian Crosby | September 28, 2011
Since this week is Banned Books Week, and since one of my colleagues over at Glendale High School is fighting for Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" to be approved as a book to teach to advanced 11th grade English students, I thought I'd share with you my experience with banned books. When looking back on the books I've taught over the years, I realize that most of them have been banned in some part of the United States at some time.  Here are the “corrupted” books I've exposed young children to:  Erich Maria Remarque's "All Quiet on the Western Front," Richard Wright's "Black Boy," John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" and "Of Mice and Men," Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist," Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451," Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," and, of course that book of dubious merit, Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
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NEWS
March 31, 2011
I was immensely pleased to read in a recent Glendale News-Press column that someone was motivated to criticize in writing the parking meters on Brand Boulevard (“Unclassified Info: Turning against the tyranny of the meters,” March 22). I’m sure a lot of people don’t like them, but with everything else going on, they simply haven’t been able to muster the energy to complain about one more irritating inconvenience. Yet Gary Huerta did a beautiful job of it. As far as I’m concerned, the city might as well have painted all the curbs red on Brand Boulevard.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | May 29, 2009
My very favorite week of the teaching year is the one following the Advanced Placement test given to my students. For five days, I sit back and observe, without uttering a word, while each class uses the time to fashion a new world. Earth has been destroyed in a thermonuclear war, and this particular group (each class) was rocketed to a new planet, Larbo, which is Earth-like in all ways. Before they can set foot on their new home, however, they must all agree on a number of issues involving government, society, family, rights, religion, crime and punishment, leadership, etc. If after five days they cannot come to agreement, they perish.
FEATURES
By Alison Kjeldgaard | January 21, 2009
In a nation where child obesity is on the rise, and more and more schools are losing the funds to provide fitness programs for their students, YMCAs across the nation have remained an important part of their respective communities. Ryan Nakota, the director of wellness at the YMCA of Glendale, acknowledges the importance of leading a healthy lifestyle, both mentally and physically. Nakota grew up in Hawaii, where he graduated from the University of Hawaii. He proceeded to become a fitness instructor there, teaching students ranging in age from 4 1/2 to 13. He coached baseball, soccer and girls’ softball before moving to Los Angeles in 1978.
NEWS
By KIMBERLIE ZAKARIAN | January 17, 2009
As I write, I just finished helping one of my daughters master her multiplication (I pray!), did several loads of laundry, cleaned up after another daughter with the stomach flu, and cleaned the stove after my sick son asked for soup. In the middle of the storm, I tried to sneak moments of calm to call back a few patients I needed to reschedule. I know we can all relate to days like these whether we have children or not. As I reflect on the day, for some reason I say it was ?a good day.?
NEWS
October 11, 2008
Unity — it’s something this community could really use. Chasms are dividing this city that need to be bridged — some shallow, some incredibly deep. People seem to let the slightest thing divide them — ethnicity, where they live in the city, smoking, politics, socioeconomics. And these are slight things, but we make them big deals. We are all guilty on some level, on some issue. Even those of us who cry foul need to take a closer look at ourselves.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
Ani Amirkhanian His friends call him "Morty." But Glendale resident Larry Thomlinson prefers to be called a "funeral director" instead of mortician, a title people tend to associate with the macabre, he said. Thomlinson is the president of Transitions Funeral Service, a full-service mortuary in Glendale that coordinates funeral arrangements in the comfort of one's home. The 62-year-old Oklahoma native has been in the funeral-directing business for 20 years.
NEWS
September 13, 2004
Ray Shelton's latest diatribe on Aug. 13 against the "Religion of Environmentalism" raises several provocative points. Unfortunately, as with all of his previous rantings, they serve mainly to emphasize the one between his ears. His is obviously the environmental sensitivity of those who believe that trees cause air pollution (they give off hydrocarbons as well as oxygen). It's natural that he would focus on the ravings of the environmental extremists.
NEWS
June 26, 2004
PATRICK AZADIAN We all have our stereotypes of what certain names should mean, and what kind of names people should possess. It is perhaps human nature to try to conform everything to our set of understandings, otherwise we may feel uncomfortable or even intimidated. My first name often evokes the question, "Hey, how did you get an Irish name?" This particular inquiry is understandable, considering more Americans trace their roots to the "green isle" than any other region of the world.
NEWS
April 16, 2004
DAN KIMBER This is a follow-up to my last installment about a learning simulation that involves kids creating a new world. Every parent, at one time or another, has uttered the following phrase to a teenage daughter or son: "Just try to put yourself in my shoes." The reaction from their child almost always involves rolled eyeballs or looks of incomprehension that say, "I won't, I can't." For many youngsters, it is an unimaginable thing. But we teachers are experienced at getting kids to role-play.
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