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February 10, 2006
Three siblings from La Crescenta are taking a stand for human rights. Tracie and Jesse Morrow joined their younger sister Zoe, 12, on the Venice boardwalk to obtain signatures on a petition promoting the implementation of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights by governments. "The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created in 1948 and has been endorsed by 191 nations, yet is painfully neglected in its actual application," Tracie said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | April 26, 2007
Two student groups at Hoover High School with a history of antipathy toward each other made a symbolic gesture of unity, tolerance and human rights Wednesday. The Armenian Club and La Voz Latina — a volunteer and fraternal campus group that focuses on Latino culture — unveiled a 10-foot-tall and 12-foot-wide mural that depicted two hands clenched together. "We have all these different cultures on campus," said Vaheh Hartoonian, 17, co-president of the school's Armenian Club.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
I strongly support and congratulate Mayor Dave Weaver's stand in not supporting the other four Glendale City Council members in their decision to establish the Korean “Comfort Women Day” and to permanently display the Korean comfort women statue in Central Park. I believe that the City Council's actions will not “elevate the city of Glendale as the city that promotes and champions human rights,” as asserted by Alex Woo, president of the Korea Glendale Sister City Assn. Rather, it may raise questions, especially in the minds of young people, about honoring some of those Korean women who may have chosen this work for financial and/or patriotic reasons; more importantly, it will enhance the ill will that still exists among many people toward Japan and will involve Glendale and the U.S. in what is a very sensitive diplomatic issue between the two Koreas and Japan.
NEWS
October 2, 2002
Janine Marnien An ordeal that lasted more than eight years has ended for one La Canada Flintridge family. David Chow was released from a Chinese prison Sept. 19, where he had been serving a 15-year sentence. He was reunited with wife, Emily, and sons Joshua and Jonathon in Los Angeles the next day. Rarely do foreign prisoners spend the length of time in a Chinese prison that Chow endured, said John Kamm, a human-rights activist who worked on the case for numerous years and described it as a "long, silent struggle."
NEWS
September 7, 2001
Marshall Allen GLENDALE -- Shells barraged the Palestinian town of Beit Jala for six hours one night in late July, while 14 members of Christian Peacemaker Teams huddled in Palestinian homes to show what members called their solidarity with the oppressed. Members of the delegation, formed by the historic peace churches -- the Mennonite Church, Church of the Brethren and Quaker denominations -- were hoping their presence as human shields would make the Israeli military "think twice" before shelling the Palestinians, said Bert Newton.
NEWS
November 13, 2000
Paul Clinton GLENDALE -- When it comes to human rights, France has succeeded where the United States has failed, according to a local Armenian group. The French senate's passage of a resolution recognizing accusations that Ottoman Turkey carried out genocide against Armenians in the first quarter of the 20th Century stands in contrast to the failure of a similar bill in the U.S. Congress last month, a leader of the group said. "France does take the issue of human rights much more seriously than the U.S.," Alex Sardar, executive director of the Western region of the Armenian National Committee, said.
NEWS
August 13, 2001
Mary Boger The News-Press editorial of Aug. 2 took exception to the Citizen's Memorial Committee inclusion of the recognition of Cesar Chavez's birthday and suggestion that additional requests for other days of commemoration be considered. Early on in the discussions of the Memorial Committee we heard first from one member and then another and then another and then yet another of the tragedies that had beset them or their ancestors because of their race, ethnicity, religion or nationality.
NEWS
June 14, 2000
Tim Willert GLENDALE -- Lauren Bruich and five friends are driving around Newport Beach, where they spent five days together in a rented beach house. "We're having a great time," said Lauren, who recently graduated as co-valedictorian of Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy. "We're just hanging out and shopping. Two of my favorite pastimes." Back in Lake View Terrace, classmate and co-valedictorian Jacqueline Yu is reflecting on the June 4 graduation ceremony, in which 97 graduates received their diplomas from the all-girls Catholic school.
NEWS
November 17, 2000
I wonder when reporters as a group will get tired of being used. This is the scene: The French Parliament is in violation of the U.N. Charter's Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In fact, if you are a Baptist, you can't practice your religion in France along with 172 other "minority" religions. This measure was passed when there were only 17 members of the French parliament in attendance, but it is still being implemented nonetheless. Now, as usual, the French Parliament whitewashes itself with a bill to "recognize the Armenian Genocide."
NEWS
May 29, 2003
Ryan Carter Tom Shiokari's voice cracked Wednesday at Wilson Middle School as he spoke about the three years he spent in an internment camp during World War II. By order of the U.S. government, he and his family lived in a 20- by 20-foot room that was dusty and hot, with four metal beds and mattresses they made from straw. "These things don't come easy because a lot of it doesn't come from your textbooks," he said as he spoke at a podium in the school's auditorium.
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NEWS
August 1, 2013
I strongly support and congratulate Mayor Dave Weaver's stand in not supporting the other four Glendale City Council members in their decision to establish the Korean “Comfort Women Day” and to permanently display the Korean comfort women statue in Central Park. I believe that the City Council's actions will not “elevate the city of Glendale as the city that promotes and champions human rights,” as asserted by Alex Woo, president of the Korea Glendale Sister City Assn. Rather, it may raise questions, especially in the minds of young people, about honoring some of those Korean women who may have chosen this work for financial and/or patriotic reasons; more importantly, it will enhance the ill will that still exists among many people toward Japan and will involve Glendale and the U.S. in what is a very sensitive diplomatic issue between the two Koreas and Japan.
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NEWS
By FRAN TUNNO | April 21, 2009
Hoover High School students are in the final quarter of the school year, with summer right around the corner and many activities ahead. Hoover students are recognizing Human Rights Week this week. Students are learning about many of the human atrocities throughout history, as well as discussing human rights violations and injustices that still exist today. Hoover?s annual Open House is from 6 to 8 tonight. Because the Hoover campus is still under construction, maps will be available to direct parents to different classrooms.
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | January 28, 2009
In 1959, Fidel Castro and a band of revolutionaries rolled into Havana, Cuba, creating a storm of controversy around the world after overthrowing the U.S.-backed government. Fifty years later, the effects of Castro’s uprising are still being felt, as local supporters of the revolutionary government continue to hail its ideals while others decry what they view as an autocratic regime. The political situation in Cuba — where Castro ruled from his takeover in 1959 until 2008, when his brother Raúl Castro took the reins of power — has been the focus of intense scrutiny in Glendale and Burbank as well.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | December 11, 2008
More than 100 people gathered Wednesday night inside a small and darkly lit bar to listen to the sounds and melodies of four Armenian artists who performed in honor of Human Rights Day. The evening celebration marked the end of Amnesty International’s Small Places Tour 2008, which began Sept. 10 and showcased more than 700 concerts worldwide. Concertgoers at the Sidebar at 1114 N. Pacific Ave. also celebrated the 60th anniversary Wednesday of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
NEWS
By Silva Sevlian | December 10, 2008
Amnesty International’s Small Places Tour 2008 will make a stop in Glendale today in honor of Human Rights Day, with live musical performances calling attention to human rights issues. “Art and music have the ability to overcome any types of limitations and show that human rights can apply to everybody,” said Danielle Solick, volunteer coordinator for Art for Amnesty, an organization that reaches out to artists to support Amnesty International. The Small Places Tour has had more than 700 concerts worldwide since it began Sept.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | April 26, 2007
Two student groups at Hoover High School with a history of antipathy toward each other made a symbolic gesture of unity, tolerance and human rights Wednesday. The Armenian Club and La Voz Latina — a volunteer and fraternal campus group that focuses on Latino culture — unveiled a 10-foot-tall and 12-foot-wide mural that depicted two hands clenched together. "We have all these different cultures on campus," said Vaheh Hartoonian, 17, co-president of the school's Armenian Club.
FEATURES
February 10, 2006
Three siblings from La Crescenta are taking a stand for human rights. Tracie and Jesse Morrow joined their younger sister Zoe, 12, on the Venice boardwalk to obtain signatures on a petition promoting the implementation of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights by governments. "The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created in 1948 and has been endorsed by 191 nations, yet is painfully neglected in its actual application," Tracie said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
April 17, 2004
Charity League's Ticktockers presented The Ticktocker Class of 2004 of National Charity League, Glendale Chapter, was honored during the Senior Presentation on March 13 at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills. Twenty Ticktockers were individually introduced and presented by their fathers. Alison Paige Sanders received the chapter's two top service awards. Ticktockers and their fathers danced the minuet at the conclusion of the program.
NEWS
April 2, 2004
DAN KIMBER At the end of each year (or sometimes at the beginning), my students are rocketed to an imaginary planet, Larbo, where they have the daunting task of starting life anew. All life on Earth has been extinguished in a nuclear holocaust, and only two spaceships were able to escape, both headed for this new planet. For five days, I sit back and only observe. My students are left alone to create a new world, presumably a better one than they left behind.
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