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Impact Fees

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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | January 23, 2014
The City Council this week moved closer to solidifying a new rule that would more than double the fees apartment developers must pay to offset impacts to the city's parks and libraries as a development boom in Glendale continues. The council is expected to finalize the new ordinance, which would also impact other types of developers, next week. For developers of multi-unit projects, the fee would increase per-unit impact fee from $7,000 to $18,751. The council initially set the rate below what was recommended by a consultant in 2007 to encourage development in downtown, but now that developers are increasingly attracted to the city, there's no need to intensify demand, officials said.
NEWS
June 21, 2005
Fred Ortega and Deborah Meron City leaders will look at a plan today to get commercial and residential developers to start footing part of the bill for parkland and libraries. City staff members are proposing that Glendale institute an impact fee on future commercial and residential construction projects to help pay for parks and library space. The City Council will hear the specifics at a study session today. Many cities throughout the Southland charge such fees, imposed on a per-unit basis for commercial, residential and mixed-use projects, Glendale Assistant Director of Planning Hassan Haghani said.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | November 11, 2006
GLENDALE — Developers and city officials will meet next week to discuss a city proposal to implement development-impact fees that would provide funds for parks, libraries and open spaces, city officials said. In October 2005, the City Council voted to draft a new law that would impose impact fees on new developments within the city, but asked that city staff members go back and look at fees per square foot versus per unit, and look further into how the fees would affect commercial and industrial developers, said George Chapjian, director of Parks, Recreation and Community Services.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 12, 2007
CITY HALL — Competing proposals over how to introduce development impact fees collided Tuesday night at a tense City Council meeting, during which a last-minute compromise saw the approval of a proposed fee schedule with assurances of support for the addition of more fees later. There was little disagreement among the council that developers should be subject to some sort of development impact fee to help mitigate the pressures new residential projects would put on the city’s already thin stock of parks and recreation facilities.
NEWS
June 23, 2005
Fred Ortega and Deborah Meron Park and library fees for future commercial and residential developments in the city are one step closer to becoming reality after the City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to have city staff members investigate how the additional charges could be imposed. Staff members will return to the council in August or September with information on how other cities handle impact fees, and with proposed fee schedules and rates, City Manager Jim Starbird said.
NEWS
By By Fred Ortega | October 26, 2005
Council moves to draft law that would impose fees on developers to benefit park and library facilities.GLENDALE CITY HALL -- The City Council voted Tuesday to draft a new law that would impose library and park impact fees on new developments within the city. The council instructed City Atty. Scott Howard to prepare a draft impact fee ordinance and staff to begin the public hearing process required for the new law. According to a study conducted for the city by Revenue Cost Specialists, LLC, such a law could cost builders of future single-family homes in the city $19,940 per unit, and $17,187 per unit for multi-family residential projects.
NEWS
By Herbert Molano | September 6, 2006
The Glendale News-Press asked the public to chime in about parks and libraries impact fees from new development ("What do you think about requiring impact fees from new developments?" Aug. 23). Here is my forecast: It is not likely to happen, and definitely will not happen at the rate recommended by the consultants the city hired. At any rate, we don't need it. It is highly unlikely that under our campaign-finance reality that any of our councilmen will dare upset the wealthy developers and real-estate interests with an impact fee of $20,000 per unit.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | November 13, 2007
CITY HALL — Two months after the City Council imposed impact fees on developers to pay for parks and library expansion, a second layer of development-based funding is scheduled for consideration today. If approved, the plan would set aside a percentage of tax revenue generated by new residential development in the city’s two redevelopment areas for parks and libraries. Councilman Frank Quintero pushed for the tax increment funding proposal on Sept. 11, when the council took the unprecedented step of approving development impact fees for all new residential and commercial projects.
NEWS
By Herbert Molano | September 8, 2007
Open letter to Mayor Ara Najarian: Your strong voice Tuesday for park development was commendable. I could not be happier with the recognition you gave to the extreme disregard that we have experienced south of the Ventura (134) Freeway. But I wonder if the fees proposed for park impact will materially alter the status quo. We have thousands of new residential units planned for the Downtown Specific Plan area. That’s just in 220 acres, let alone the shortage that we have accumulated in greater downtown south of the freeway.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | December 25, 2009
CITY HALL — When the City Council in 2007 imposed development impact fees on new projects in Glendale, they were heralded as a way to bring in tens of millions of dollars to combat the city’s lack of park space and aging library facilities, but a protracted recession has kept that revenue to a trickle, officials said. The fees — which total thousands of dollars per condo or apartment — were approved by the City Council as a way to alleviate the extra stresses placed on city services by new developments, but proposed buildings have either stalled or been put on the shelf as developers wait out a tough recession that has made securing financing extremely difficult.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | January 23, 2014
The City Council this week moved closer to solidifying a new rule that would more than double the fees apartment developers must pay to offset impacts to the city's parks and libraries as a development boom in Glendale continues. The council is expected to finalize the new ordinance, which would also impact other types of developers, next week. For developers of multi-unit projects, the fee would increase per-unit impact fee from $7,000 to $18,751. The council initially set the rate below what was recommended by a consultant in 2007 to encourage development in downtown, but now that developers are increasingly attracted to the city, there's no need to intensify demand, officials said.
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NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | December 1, 2010
CITY HALL — The City Council on Tuesday voted not to impose higher development impact fees for a mixed-use project downtown, but Mayor Ara Najarian argued that the lost revenue amounted to a lost opportunity to fund more parkland in central Glendale. The delay was prompted by a request from the developer, American Multifamily, which argued the higher fees — which are meant to offset the impacts of added density to the public infrastructure — could hurt their ability to obtain financing for its Broadway Lofts project — 248 studio and loft apartment units on top of several major ground-floor tenants.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | December 25, 2009
CITY HALL — When the City Council in 2007 imposed development impact fees on new projects in Glendale, they were heralded as a way to bring in tens of millions of dollars to combat the city’s lack of park space and aging library facilities, but a protracted recession has kept that revenue to a trickle, officials said. The fees — which total thousands of dollars per condo or apartment — were approved by the City Council as a way to alleviate the extra stresses placed on city services by new developments, but proposed buildings have either stalled or been put on the shelf as developers wait out a tough recession that has made securing financing extremely difficult.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | December 22, 2007
CITY HALL — Diatribes, rants, tardiness and distraction are all attributes that have plagued the dais this year, but as the City Council looks forward to a slate of packed agendas in January, its members seem more willing to deal with and self-police the idiosyncrasies of public debate rather than govern them. Councilman Frank Quintero has been known to show up at least 30 minutes late to meetings, Councilman Bob Yousefian’s colleagues have accused him of “sucking the air out the room” during discussions, others cut in to speak, and recent outbursts from and to the dais have spurred calls for more civility, but none of it was enough on Tuesday for Mayor Ara Najarian to push through a code of conduct codifying rules for council behavior.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | November 13, 2007
CITY HALL — Two months after the City Council imposed impact fees on developers to pay for parks and library expansion, a second layer of development-based funding is scheduled for consideration today. If approved, the plan would set aside a percentage of tax revenue generated by new residential development in the city’s two redevelopment areas for parks and libraries. Councilman Frank Quintero pushed for the tax increment funding proposal on Sept. 11, when the council took the unprecedented step of approving development impact fees for all new residential and commercial projects.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | October 9, 2007
CITY HALL — Councilman Frank Quintero will present a proposal tonight to set aside a portion of property tax revenue to fund parks and libraries in redevelopment areas, nearly a month after drawing political scorn for saying the city’s first development impact fee schedule lacked teeth. His proposal would be separate from and would not affect the development impact fee ordinance that passed 4-1 on Sept. 11, which on a sliding introductory scale will eventually charge $10,500 per residential unit in 2013 and more than $3 per square foot for all other projects.
NEWS
September 24, 2007
Government needs tobacco and its users In regards to the recent spate of letters to the Glendale News-Press concerning the possible public smoking ban in Glendale, how much is enough? At what point will people realize that the war on smoking has largely, almost totally, been won? Where can you smoke indoors in the state of California other than your own car and home? Furthermore, you can’t light up at parks, beaches, ball games, bus stops and a list of other tobacco-restricted spots as long as your arm. Strip clubs and medical marijuana shops have more freedom to advertise their “products” than do tobacco companies.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 12, 2007
CITY HALL — Competing proposals over how to introduce development impact fees collided Tuesday night at a tense City Council meeting, during which a last-minute compromise saw the approval of a proposed fee schedule with assurances of support for the addition of more fees later. There was little disagreement among the council that developers should be subject to some sort of development impact fee to help mitigate the pressures new residential projects would put on the city’s already thin stock of parks and recreation facilities.
NEWS
By Herbert Molano | September 8, 2007
Open letter to Mayor Ara Najarian: Your strong voice Tuesday for park development was commendable. I could not be happier with the recognition you gave to the extreme disregard that we have experienced south of the Ventura (134) Freeway. But I wonder if the fees proposed for park impact will materially alter the status quo. We have thousands of new residential units planned for the Downtown Specific Plan area. That’s just in 220 acres, let alone the shortage that we have accumulated in greater downtown south of the freeway.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | June 22, 2007
Purchase of the Rockhaven property and Mountain Oaks open space are among the capital projects the Glendale City Council will address after July 1. The council agreed to take the package of proposed projects off the table until after the upcoming budget is adopted June 26 and then address individual items in a series of study sessions. According to city finance director Ron Ahlers, Glendale has about $75 million available over the next ten years for major capital improvements.
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