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NEWS
July 18, 2013
The denial of the facts regarding the Comfort Women is an affront to all these women of the occupied Asian countries. Our house and whole blocks in the neighborhood were confiscated to become a barbed-wire enclosure for the Japanese army's houses of leisure that were occupied by Comfort Women. This occurred during the occupation of Surabaya (Java-Indonesia) during World War II. I applaud the Glendale City Council for approving this long overdue monument. R. van der Werff Glendale
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Re: “Mayor reopens statue tiff,” Oct. 3. I hold the Glendale News-Press' accuracy by my score quite high. Then we learn things by the spoken word of others and the age-old game of “telephone” steps in. The greater the number of “telephone” connections, the less likely that accuracy will prevail. So when I read a story concerning how the mayor of Glendale found his way to a reporter from a “far right” channel I am already going “huh?” Now the lead to this front-page article was “Glendale was wrong to install controversial monument honoring Korean sex slaves taken by the Japanese Army during World War II, Mayor Dave Weaver said.” Mayor Weaver upheld the facts that these women were taken by the Japanese Army and that they were sex slaves.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 26, 2014
In City Council chambers packed with about 100 people, Glendale council members said they were not fazed by a lawsuit filed last week in federal district court asking a judge to remove a city statue honoring women victimized by the Japanese Army during World War II. The statue isn't going anywhere, they added. “I think the lawsuit will be put to bed very quickly and we can move on and we can be proud of this statue,” said Councilwoman Laura Friedman, noting that she was glad the statue has focused international attention on Glendale and the women honored by the 1,100-pound memorial in Central Park.
NEWS
December 19, 2013
Good morning, 818 readers. It's expected to be a wet day with a 60% chance of rain for Los Angeles County today, Thursday, Dec. 19. Showers are expected after sunrise and could slam roads for commuters. Here are the top headlines in the 818 area code: Remember that controversial 'comfort women' statue at Glendale's Central Park? Well, it prompted a trio of leaders from Japan's House of Representatives to visit the Los Angeles area, calling on Glendale to remove the 1,100-pound statue honoring an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 women from Korea, China and other countries forced into prostitution by the Japanese Army during World War II. La Cañada residents--including some on horseback--linked hands and stood on the bridge overlooking the Devil's Gate Dam on Saturday to protest Los Angeles County Department of Public Works' plan to remove between 2.4 and 4 million cubic yards of sediment over a five-year period . Officials warn that flooding could happen if the debris isn't removed.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | January 2, 2014
Flooding inboxes at Glendale City Hall with emails didn't work, neither did pleas from Japanese politicians, but now those who oppose a Glendale monument to women used as sex slaves by the Japanese Army during World War II are trying a different approach - petitioning the White House . A petition asking for removal of the 1,100-pound statue on President Barack Obama's website “We The People” has netted more than 100,000 signatures ...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 21, 2014
A Los Angeles law firm has agreed to represent the city of Glendale for free in its defense of a statue honoring women taken as sex slaves for the Japanese Army during World War II , the installation of which has been called into question by a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court last month. This is the first time in at least three years that a law firm has represented the city on a pro-bono basis, said City Atty. Mike Garcia. "Obviously, there are folks who think the lawsuit doesn't have merit," Garcia said.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
Glendale was wrong to install a controversial monument honoring Korean sex slaves taken by the Japanese Army during World War II, Mayor Dave Weaver said during an interview published Monday on a Japanese television station's YouTube channel . “We opened a beehive, a hornet's nest,” he told Channel Sakura. “We just shouldn't have done it.” VIDEO: Glendale Mayor disagrees with 'comfort women' statue decision The statue - the first on the West Coast honoring so-called comfort women on public property - thrust Glendale into a controversy that has been stoked thousands of miles away.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 18, 2013
Three members of Japan's House of Representatives called on Glendale to remove an 1,100-pound statue honoring an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 women from Korea, China and other countries forced into prostitution by the Japanese Army during World War II. The trio, Mio Sugita of the Hyogo Prefecture, Yuzuru Nishida of Chiba, and Hiromu Nakamaru of Hiroshima, are members of the Japan Restoration Party, a one-year-old conservative political party...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | November 6, 2013
About 20 Korean Americans protested on Tuesday against Mayor Dave Weaver's recent critiques of a memorial in Central Park that honors women taken as sex slaves by the Japanese Army during World War II. VIDEO: Weaver tells Japanese media he disagrees with 'Comfort Women' statue The protesters held up signs that read “Glendale Small City Big Heart” and “End Sexual Violence Against Women” outside City Hall. During the council meeting, several protesters said they were disappointed that the mayor would tell Japanese reporters and his counterpart at Glendale's sister city in Japan that the 1,110-pound statue honoring so-called comfort women should not have been erected.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | November 16, 2013
A councilman from Glendale's sister city in Japan tried to convince city officials to remove a statue in Central Park honoring women forced into prostitution during World War II by the Japanese Army in a closed-door meeting at City Hall Friday. His plea came during the first face-to-face meeting between officials from both cities since Glendale installed the controversial statue in July, prompting Higashiosaka officials to consider dissolving the 50-year sister-city relationship.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 21, 2014
A Los Angeles law firm has agreed to represent the city of Glendale for free in its defense of a statue honoring women taken as sex slaves for the Japanese Army during World War II , the installation of which has been called into question by a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court last month. This is the first time in at least three years that a law firm has represented the city on a pro-bono basis, said City Atty. Mike Garcia. "Obviously, there are folks who think the lawsuit doesn't have merit," Garcia said.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 26, 2014
In City Council chambers packed with about 100 people, Glendale council members said they were not fazed by a lawsuit filed last week in federal district court asking a judge to remove a city statue honoring women victimized by the Japanese Army during World War II. The statue isn't going anywhere, they added. “I think the lawsuit will be put to bed very quickly and we can move on and we can be proud of this statue,” said Councilwoman Laura Friedman, noting that she was glad the statue has focused international attention on Glendale and the women honored by the 1,100-pound memorial in Central Park.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | January 2, 2014
Flooding inboxes at Glendale City Hall with emails didn't work, neither did pleas from Japanese politicians, but now those who oppose a Glendale monument to women used as sex slaves by the Japanese Army during World War II are trying a different approach - petitioning the White House . A petition asking for removal of the 1,100-pound statue on President Barack Obama's website “We The People” has netted more than 100,000 signatures ...
NEWS
December 19, 2013
Good morning, 818 readers. It's expected to be a wet day with a 60% chance of rain for Los Angeles County today, Thursday, Dec. 19. Showers are expected after sunrise and could slam roads for commuters. Here are the top headlines in the 818 area code: Remember that controversial 'comfort women' statue at Glendale's Central Park? Well, it prompted a trio of leaders from Japan's House of Representatives to visit the Los Angeles area, calling on Glendale to remove the 1,100-pound statue honoring an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 women from Korea, China and other countries forced into prostitution by the Japanese Army during World War II. La Cañada residents--including some on horseback--linked hands and stood on the bridge overlooking the Devil's Gate Dam on Saturday to protest Los Angeles County Department of Public Works' plan to remove between 2.4 and 4 million cubic yards of sediment over a five-year period . Officials warn that flooding could happen if the debris isn't removed.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 18, 2013
Three members of Japan's House of Representatives called on Glendale to remove an 1,100-pound statue honoring an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 women from Korea, China and other countries forced into prostitution by the Japanese Army during World War II. The trio, Mio Sugita of the Hyogo Prefecture, Yuzuru Nishida of Chiba, and Hiromu Nakamaru of Hiroshima, are members of the Japan Restoration Party, a one-year-old conservative political party...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | November 16, 2013
A councilman from Glendale's sister city in Japan tried to convince city officials to remove a statue in Central Park honoring women forced into prostitution during World War II by the Japanese Army in a closed-door meeting at City Hall Friday. His plea came during the first face-to-face meeting between officials from both cities since Glendale installed the controversial statue in July, prompting Higashiosaka officials to consider dissolving the 50-year sister-city relationship.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | November 6, 2013
About 20 Korean Americans protested on Tuesday against Mayor Dave Weaver's recent critiques of a memorial in Central Park that honors women taken as sex slaves by the Japanese Army during World War II. VIDEO: Weaver tells Japanese media he disagrees with 'Comfort Women' statue The protesters held up signs that read “Glendale Small City Big Heart” and “End Sexual Violence Against Women” outside City Hall. During the council meeting, several protesters said they were disappointed that the mayor would tell Japanese reporters and his counterpart at Glendale's sister city in Japan that the 1,110-pound statue honoring so-called comfort women should not have been erected.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Re: “Mayor reopens statue tiff,” Oct. 3. I hold the Glendale News-Press' accuracy by my score quite high. Then we learn things by the spoken word of others and the age-old game of “telephone” steps in. The greater the number of “telephone” connections, the less likely that accuracy will prevail. So when I read a story concerning how the mayor of Glendale found his way to a reporter from a “far right” channel I am already going “huh?” Now the lead to this front-page article was “Glendale was wrong to install controversial monument honoring Korean sex slaves taken by the Japanese Army during World War II, Mayor Dave Weaver said.” Mayor Weaver upheld the facts that these women were taken by the Japanese Army and that they were sex slaves.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
Glendale was wrong to install a controversial monument honoring Korean sex slaves taken by the Japanese Army during World War II, Mayor Dave Weaver said during an interview published Monday on a Japanese television station's YouTube channel . “We opened a beehive, a hornet's nest,” he told Channel Sakura. “We just shouldn't have done it.” VIDEO: Glendale Mayor disagrees with 'comfort women' statue decision The statue - the first on the West Coast honoring so-called comfort women on public property - thrust Glendale into a controversy that has been stoked thousands of miles away.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
The denial of the facts regarding the Comfort Women is an affront to all these women of the occupied Asian countries. Our house and whole blocks in the neighborhood were confiscated to become a barbed-wire enclosure for the Japanese army's houses of leisure that were occupied by Comfort Women. This occurred during the occupation of Surabaya (Java-Indonesia) during World War II. I applaud the Glendale City Council for approving this long overdue monument. R. van der Werff Glendale
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