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Jose Maria Verdugo

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NEWS
July 12, 2003
At the edge of the Verdugo Adobe's porch hangs a sign, "Catalina Adobe." And therein lies a tale. For many years, Glendale's newest historic site, the Verdugo Adobe at 2211 Bonita Drive, bore the name of Catalina Verdugo, the daughter of land grant owner Jose Maria Verdugo. When Jose Maria Verdugo signed his will in 1828, he divided his estate between two of his children, his son, Julio, and one of his daughters, Catalina. Although he had two other daughters, they had both married and were presumably well provided for. Catalina, however, was blind from smallpox and had never married.
NEWS
August 25, 2001
Katherine Yamada Credit: Courtesy, Special Collections, Glendale Public Library Caption: Dora Verdugo, seated, was a great-granddaughter of Jose Maria Verdugo. In this photograph, taken in 1935, she is showing Hazel B. Hansen a platter that she inherited from him. The platter, part of a set used by the Verdugos, is now on display in the Special Collections Room of the Central Library. Jose Maria Verdugo left his huge estate divided equally between his only son, Julio, and his oldest daughter, Catalina, who was left blinded after an attack of small pox and had never married.
NEWS
September 28, 2002
Early in the 1900s, a trio of adobe houses stood along the foothills of west Glendale. Only one remains. One was the old Jose Maria Verdugo home, placed by old-timers near the present Hoover High School. Another was an adobe near Brand Boulevard and Mountain Street, owned by Rafaela Verdugo Sepulveda and her husband Fernando Sepulveda. Later, their home was the site of the Casa Verdugo restaurant. The third adobe was built by the stepdaughter of Rafaela Verdugo Sepulveda.
NEWS
August 11, 2003
Joshua Pelzer A little piece of Glendale history was opened to residents who were out to enjoy the Casa Adobe de San Rafael on Sunday. Some partook in a private gathering under a sheltered portion of the nearly 2-acre garden, while others quietly strolled through the historic 1871 home of Tomas Sanchez -- one of Los Angeles County's first sheriffs -- and his wife, Maria. The home once sat on 100 of the original 36,434 acres awarded by the King of Spain to Jose Maria Verdugo -- a Spanish soldier whose family settled the land in 1784.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
Joyce Rudolph Actress Elena Verdugo, a descendant of Glendale's pioneering Verdugo family, is scheduled to attend the Days of the Verdugos Heritage Assn.'s "Fiestecita" on Friday at the Casa Adobe de San Rafael. The event is a fundraiser for Glendale's newest museum, the Verdugo Adobe, at 2211 Bonita Drive in the Verdugo Woodlands, association President Ann Denis said. Local restaurants will provide food, and teen entertainer Emanuel Reyes will entertain guests with mariachi music.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada and By Katherine Yamada | September 12, 2013
What do Glendale and La Cañada Flintridge have in common? Well, for one thing, the land that these cities occupy was once part of the 36,4030-acre land grant that was given to Cpl. Jose Maria Verdugo in 1784. The boundaries of the Rancho San Rafael land grant were primarily defined by the Verdugo Mountains, the Arroyo Seco and the Los Angeles River, according to Jo Anne Sadler, writing in the "Ledger," the May, 2013, newsletter of the Historical Society of the Crescenta Valley. In 1834, a 5,745-acre parcel was carved out of the northern portion and granted to Los Angeles school teacher Ygnacio Coronel.
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NEWS
By Katherine Yamada and By Katherine Yamada | September 12, 2013
What do Glendale and La Cañada Flintridge have in common? Well, for one thing, the land that these cities occupy was once part of the 36,4030-acre land grant that was given to Cpl. Jose Maria Verdugo in 1784. The boundaries of the Rancho San Rafael land grant were primarily defined by the Verdugo Mountains, the Arroyo Seco and the Los Angeles River, according to Jo Anne Sadler, writing in the "Ledger," the May, 2013, newsletter of the Historical Society of the Crescenta Valley. In 1834, a 5,745-acre parcel was carved out of the northern portion and granted to Los Angeles school teacher Ygnacio Coronel.
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NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | July 8, 2011
Glendale's Jubilee in 1981 marked 75 years since its founding in 1906. During the jubilee event, the city's pioneers (those who had lived here for 75 years or more) were honored. Making the introductions that day was Carroll W. Parcher, born in 1903, whose father was Wilmot Parcher, the city's first mayor. As Carroll announced each honoree, mayor John F. Day, presented them with a commendation and Glendale News-Press writer Ellen Perry made brief comments. The oldest attendee was Dora Verdugo, then 99 years old. She was the great-granddaughter of Jose Maria Verdugo, owner of the Spanish land grant on which Glendale was founded, according to the Daily News, May 16, 1981.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | July 1, 2011
The United States was only a few years old and California was still under Spanish rule when Jose Maria Verdugo applied for permission to graze his cattle and horses in our fertile valleys. Verdugo, a native of Loreto, in Baja California, was serving as a military guard at the mission at San Gabriel. In 1784 he received one of the first land grants made in Alta California by the King of Spain and one of the largest ever issued during the Spanish occupation. That land now incorporates a good part of present day Glendale, Burbank, Eagle Rock, Highland Park, the west part of Pasadena and the area in the triangle formed by the junction of the Arroyo Seco and the Los Angeles River, according to Carroll W. Parcher in his chronicle, “Glendale Community Book.” The huge land grant remained intact for less than 100 years.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Dora Verdugo was an important figure in Glendale’s history. She was a living link to Jose Maria Verdugo, the man who owned the land stretching from present day Glendale to the arroyo in Pasadena and to the Los Angeles River. But she also is remembered by some simply as the woman who lived down the street. Roy Tomlin, who has lived on West Elk Avenue most of his life, is one of them. “Dora moved here in 1936, when she was 54 years old,” he said. “She moved from her home on Verdugo Avenue into a house owned by George Hutchinson, who had worked for her in earlier years.” The Tomlin family became very close to Verdugo.
NEWS
By KATHERINE YAMADA | May 23, 2008
Not only can Don Urquidez trace his lineage back to Glendale?s founder, Jose Maria Verdugo, but the house he lives in on La Crescenta Avenue has been in the hands of Verdugo descendants since the Verdugo land grant was executed in the 1780s. After Jose Maria Verdugo?s death, the land was divided between his son, Julio and one of his daughters, Catalina. In the great partition of 1871, much of the land was allotted to those with a legal claim against the Verdugos. Julio and Catalina each received a small portion.
NEWS
By KATHERINE YAMADA | February 15, 2008
The story of the bandit for whom Vasquez Rocks are named is a story with special interest to local history buffs. A passage written by Elizabeth Sherer, widow of historian J.C. Sherer, piqued my interest in the bandits who roamed the valley in the days when the old Verdugo land grant had few inhabitants. Addressing the Glendale Historical Society in 1956, Sherer said the old Verdugo Road was first broken through by Jose Maria Verdugo while traveling between his domain and the pueblo of Los Angeles.
NEWS
By KATHERINE YAMADA | August 31, 2007
New homeowner Arye Gross was thrilled to discover that he and his family live in the house that Dora Verdugo built. During a recent trip to the Special Collections Room of the Central Library, Gross learned that his house on Verdugo Road was built by Dora Verdugo, great-granddaughter of land grant owner Jose Maria Verdugo. Dora Verdugo was born in 1882 in an adobe built by her father, Teodoro, in what is now the Verdugo Woodlands. After her father died in 1904, she sold the adobe.
NEWS
By KATHERINE YAMADA | January 19, 2007
Onondarka Ranch, nestled in the Verdugo Mountains above La Crescenta Avenue, has had only a few owners since it was first sold by descendants of land-grant owner Jose Maria Verdugo. George Englehardt acquired the 100-plus-acre ranch in 1875 and turned much of it into an orchard. He built a house on the edge of the property, just across the Verdugo Wash from a lane that later became La Crescenta Avenue. In 1900 Englehardt sold the property to the Sepulveda family, who sold it to Angelino Galenfino.
NEWS
By KATHERINE YAMADA | February 17, 2006
yamadaThe Verdugo Mountains, once part of the huge acreage owned by Jose Maria Verdugo and now one of the city's greatest resources, was the centerpiece of a recent tour for members of the Historical Society of the Crescenta Valley. On a sunny Saturday morning in late January, more than 60 members met at Crescenta Valley Park where president Mike Lawler assigned us to vehicles able to navigate the dirt fire roads. I joined Jo Ness, Roberta Medford and Terry Beyer in a vehicle driven by Bill Weisman.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
Joyce Rudolph Actress Elena Verdugo, a descendant of Glendale's pioneering Verdugo family, is scheduled to attend the Days of the Verdugos Heritage Assn.'s "Fiestecita" on Friday at the Casa Adobe de San Rafael. The event is a fundraiser for Glendale's newest museum, the Verdugo Adobe, at 2211 Bonita Drive in the Verdugo Woodlands, association President Ann Denis said. Local restaurants will provide food, and teen entertainer Emanuel Reyes will entertain guests with mariachi music.
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