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NEWS
July 10, 2013
At a time when unemployment continues at a high level, our public education system has been crippled and the infrastructure is in shambles, I find it hard to share Mike Gatt's enthusiasm for his bill which provides that parking at broken meters shall be both permitted and not ticketed. Hardly the stuff of which legacies are made. Are they a nuisance? Sure. But really, shouldn't our representatives be setting the bar a bit higher? Fred Fox Glendale
NEWS
January 23, 2004
KIMBERLIE ZAKARIAN A woman I know once said: "We can't expect God to protect us when we are not following the laws of the land." She was talking to a young mother who did not believe in buckling her youngster in a car seat as she drove around because she assumed that God would protect her child. As Christians, we must remember that God commands us to obey earthly laws: "Obey your leaders and submit to their authority. They keep watch over you as men who must give account" (Hebrews 13:17)
NEWS
August 26, 2011
As a citizen of Glendale, I am just wondering if loitering, smoking and littering laws are in fact still laws within the city. On any given day or night (mostly night), you can find groups of teens and young adults hanging around in parking lots all across the city. They play their music, smoke cigarettes and throw all their trash right where they stand. They try to intimidate others and make the parking lots very uncomfortable places to be. The parking lots next to Carl's Jr. on Glenoaks, the 7-Eleven on the corner of Glenoaks and Highland and the Ralphs parking lot on Glendale Avenue near Glendale Community College are just a few of the hot spots.
NEWS
The Los Angeles Times | August 15, 2011
Assembly Speaker John Perez, in the face of a battle with a member of his own caucus and a lawsuits from the Los Angeles Times and others, has ordered a full-scale examination of the legislature's open-records laws. In a letter to assembly members released Monday, Perez said Rules Committee Chairwoman Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) would lead the study of the current rules and suggest changes to be adopted next year. “I believe that updating our policies to reflect the 21st century world we live in is a vital step ... ," Perez said in the statement.
NEWS
January 1, 2003
Gretchen Hoffman A host of new laws take effect today, ranging from healthcare measures to traffic precautions. Of the 2,191 bills introduced during the 2002 legislative session, Gov. Gray Davis signed 1,168 into law and vetoed 264. Among the bills to take effect today are legislation by state Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale), Assemblywoman Carol Liu (D-La Canada Flintridge) and Sen. Jack Scott (D-Glendale). Frommer's AB 2873, which was inspired by corporate scandals like Enron, requires audit documents and records to be retained for a minimum of seven years.
NEWS
August 24, 2004
The people of this state do not yield their sovereignty to the agencies that serve them. The people in delegating authority do not give their public servants the right to decide what is good for the people to know and what is not good for them to know. The people insist on remaining informed so that they may retain control over the instruments they have created. (Brown Act (54950)-Policy Declaration) The headline in the Aug. 12 News-Press ("Comments by Yousefian spark debate")
NEWS
January 16, 2010
For the second year in a row, Glendale’s clampdown on secondhand smoke got a glowing endorsement from the American Lung Assn., being named one of just three cities in the state to get an A grade on its annual report card. Last year, Glendale was the only L.A. County city to get the top grade. This year, Calabasas joined the A Club. Certainly, having an ordinance on the books that bans smoking in just about every accessible public space — from most outdoor dining patios to parks and parking lots — is about as comprehensive as a city can get in trying to protect nonsmokers from the unhealthful effects of secondhand smoke.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | December 29, 2007
Some laws can be nonsensical and obsolete. But once they are in the books, instead of revising them, we often choose to ignore them. If you’ve ever driven on Chevy Chase Drive and have tried to actually stick to the 15-mph speed limit, you’d know exactly what I mean. Going up to my friend’s house, I followed all the posted speed limits last week. First there was the 35-mph speed limit. Fair enough, it was manageable. Then there was the 25-mph speed limit.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | July 1, 2008
GLENDALE — Police officers will start enforcing two new cell phone laws today that prohibit drivers from using hand-held phones. Laws went into effect at midnight, when police began ticketing drivers talking on cell phones without using hands-free devices, unless they could prove it was an emergency, Glendale police Sgt. Dennis Smith said. “We are going to be vigorously enforcing the new laws,” Smith said. “There is no grace period.” Glendale police officers will not set up sting operations aimed at citing motorists who are using hand-held cell phones, but officers will be looking for motorists who aren’t following the laws, he said.
NEWS
July 5, 2005
The Glendale News-Press visited R.D. White Elementary and asked students, "What is the most challenging part of running your class government?" "Getting the bills passed to become laws because there's so many steps to get them passed." Paulo Bautista, 12 "Making the government the best it could be. The cabinet members are always trying to find ideas for what's best for the class. It's hard because if they're presenting a bill and they don't get it passed, then they have to rewrite it. All that hard work and they can't make it."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 21, 2014
A Los Angeles law firm has agreed to represent the city of Glendale for free in its defense of a statue honoring women taken as sex slaves for the Japanese Army during World War II , the installation of which has been called into question by a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court last month. This is the first time in at least three years that a law firm has represented the city on a pro-bono basis, said City Atty. Mike Garcia. "Obviously, there are folks who think the lawsuit doesn't have merit," Garcia said.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | March 7, 2014
Glendale Community College educators are gearing up to implement a state law that aims to improve students' graduation and transfer rates. When the fall semester begins, incoming students will be asked to create an educational plan, stating whether they are interested in earning a specific degree, a certificate or whether they want to transfer to a four-year school. "The way that I like to explain a student education plan - it's like having a personal GPS so that you know how to get where you're going," said Jeanette Stirdivant, who is the interim dean of student services for the college.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 7, 2014
The city of Glendale will hire outside legal help to represent the city in a lawsuit filed last week seeking to force the city to stop transferring tens of millions of dollars from its utility to the General Fund for police, libraries and other general services. The City Council discussed the lawsuit behind closed doors on Tuesday and after the evening council meeting announced that they plan to hire the Los Angeles law firm Colantuono & Levin. The lawsuit, filed by a group called Glendale Coalition for Better Government, asserts that the long-standing money transfer is a “backdoor tax” since the council continued to move money from the utility at the same time it approved electric rate increases to pay for needed infrastructure improvements.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
I wish to express my profound thanks to the Glendale Police Department for finally embarking into a serious traffic law enforcement program . I hope that this effort will continue and not be a temporary activity, as the dreadful drivers of Glendale do not learn civil behavior quickly. I also suggest that, in addition to ticketing “distracted drivers,” the police start enforcing the entire traffic law and include such violations as tailgating, unsafe and reckless lane changes, illegal exhaust system and lighting modifications of cars, etc. Also, institute a program addressing input by the residents for traffic problems and violations in their neighborhoods.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
Good morning, 818 readers! Today is Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014. Weather in the Glendale area is expected to hit a high of 63 degrees and a low of 44. We're rounding up the top headlines in the region: A tanker truck that overturned near the 2 Freeway in Eagle Rock early Wednesday left plenty to cry about after sending its load of milk down an embankment. The truck veered over the side of the transition road from the eastbound 134 Freeway to the southbound 2 Freeway at about 3:30 a.m., according to the California Highway Patrol.
NEWS
January 26, 2014
Good morning, 818 readers. Today is Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014. The National Weather Service expects temperatures for the Glendale area to see a high around 62 and a low of 43. We're rounding up the top news headlines in your region: The Glendale City Council directed its staff this week to look into claims from a Glendale man who says he was stopped and interrogated by police four times in the past six months for a vehicle infraction for...
NEWS
January 24, 2014
A property owner allows frequent use of a house for parties , the celebrations get obnoxiously loud, the neighbors grow weary and friction ensues. It's a perennial issue in many communities and it's becoming ever more prevalent as owners or property managers use the Internet to list their homes in residentially zoned areas for short-term rentals - for as brief a rental period as a single day. Here, in the 1300 block of Norton Avenue, there's a large home that police have been called to seven different times since October by neighbors objecting to the excessive noise and traffic associated with parties being held there by these transient tenants.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | January 11, 2014
A new California law that took effect earlier this month expands the rights of transgender students, allowing them to participate on sports teams and use school facilities such as restrooms and locker rooms that correspond to each student's gender identity, and not necessarily the gender listed on the student's record. But Glendale school officials, who plan to adhere to the new law, said it won't create many changes in the district. While the law is more specific than others that already protect students' rights, local schools have already been recognizing the rights of transgender students, according to Glendale Unified Supt.
NEWS
By Camila Castellanos | January 2, 2014
The sun shone at Glendale Community College as Art Darbinian, 19, waived to fellow students and maneuvered the tram he uses to help monitor the campus as a cadet at the school's police department. “One of the things I love about my job is that I really get to see the inter-workings of the college,” the biology student said, nodding hellos to custodians and staff as he rattled off the building names and areas where he often patrols. Darbinian is one of 15 cadets at GCC, working part-time to help bolster the college's full-time police department.
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