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NEWS
July 26, 2008
The days of $200,000 campaigns for a seat on the City Council are over in Glendale, and it’s about time. The City Council on Tuesday introduced a comprehensive package of political donor restrictions that will limit contributions from individuals, corporations and labor unions to $1,000 per candidate. It might not be as drastic as some were hoping for, but this is a move that will dramatically change future elections in the city — for the better. In discussions to change what was considered a no-holds-barred approach to campaign finance, city officials often cited Burbank’s use of campaign contribution limits — where $20,000 council campaigns are among the most extravagant.
NEWS
October 28, 2000
As Glendale has grown over the decades, so has the divide between South Glendale and the rest of the city. Even referring the portion of Glendale south of Broadway as "South Glendale" triggers an emotional response from many loyal Glendale residents. This relatively densely populated section of town has been gathering more attention for its need for parks, growing businesses and as a home for families. It has become a key battleground in local elections.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- In his longest public comment yet on the drive to kick him out of office, Mayor Gus Gomez this week called the recall effort an "abuse" that would "undermine the integrity of our local elections." Gomez made the statement in a six-paragraph response to the recall notice served on him last week by former council candidate Joe Mandoky. Mandoky is trying to recall the mayor for his decision to lower the American flag to half-staff on April 24 in commemoration of the Armenian Genocide.
NEWS
March 28, 2001
Phillip Kazanjian Local elections are of great benefit to our community. The process allows voters the opportunity to observe, question and evaluate the candidates. The candidates then voice their ideas and make promises. Those that follow the elections have noted that after these candidates are elected little happens. Then, invariably, when their term ends they run for reelection and promise to work on the same problems they did not solve the first time they were elected.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | November 3, 2006
I don't understand why people don't vote. I am from Iowa, who's state caucus, especially for the presidential election, was a media and political circus. It was exciting but with all the media coverage, what they didn't show you was the lessons we learned before the political circus came to town. By the time I had graduated high school I had met our governor, Robert Ray, several times. My class would take field trips to the capital where we would be allowed to have a one-on-one meeting with him. We knew our representatives, local and federal.
NEWS
February 9, 2005
We deserve sound walls in La Canada The level of noise generated by traffic on the Foothill (210) Freeway diminishes the quality of life as well as the property values in the surrounding communities. The noise is deafening for the houses immediately adjacent to the freeway, and can be heard at least a mile away. The hillside properties suffer immensely because the sound thunders up the slopes. I cannot sit in my backyard during rush hour due to the noise, and it is getting worse by the year.
NEWS
By Molly Shore | May 27, 2011
I enjoyed Ron Kaye’s column, “Making a true effort to connect,” in the May 22 edition of the News-Press & Leader. Kaye and I are the same age. We have lived through the same eras, and I know what he is saying and feeling about the changing world. He is correct; we can never go back to the way life was in earlier years. That is probably why every Memorial and Veterans Day I attend observances at Burbank’s McCambridge Park. The flag-waving, the patriotic music, the genuine respect shown to all service men and women, dead and living, somehow for a brief period of time transports me back to the country I grew up in, not the one I live in today.
NEWS
By CARL W. RAGGIO | March 27, 2007
What if the sample ballot regarding Glendale's upcoming election was in English only? Would it make a difference on April 3rd? What if the turnout was the usual 20%? Would there be any kind of a change? And what if the ratio of absentee ballots cast was to be the same as the ballots cast at the precincts, would there be more votes to be counted? When I received my sample ballot some weeks ago and saw the size and scope of the ballot it became apparent to me that attempting to include much of the world in a local election has been taken too far. We are a city of more than 200,000 people.
NEWS
January 21, 2011
Editor's Note: Numerous instances of plagiarism have been discovered in Dan Kimber's “Education Matters” column, which ran in the News- Press from September 2003 to September 2011. In those columns where plagiarism has been found, a For the Record specifying the details will be appended to the piece. The founders of this great nation had the foresight to separate government and religion, reasoning that the one has no business mixing with the other. The wisdom of that separation, despite periodic efforts to establish a state religion, has been demonstrated throughout our country's history.
NEWS
January 1, 2012
Politically speaking, all bets are off, the rules have changed and everything is up for grabs in 2012. Legislative and congressional districts have been redrawn by a citizen's commission without the gerrymandering that has contributed so much to the stalemates and gridlock in Washington and Sacramento for most of the last two decades. Even more importantly, the party primary system is gone, replaced by an open primary system that allows you on June 5 to cast your ballot for any candidate, no matter the party affiliation.
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NEWS
January 1, 2012
Politically speaking, all bets are off, the rules have changed and everything is up for grabs in 2012. Legislative and congressional districts have been redrawn by a citizen's commission without the gerrymandering that has contributed so much to the stalemates and gridlock in Washington and Sacramento for most of the last two decades. Even more importantly, the party primary system is gone, replaced by an open primary system that allows you on June 5 to cast your ballot for any candidate, no matter the party affiliation.
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NEWS
By Molly Shore | May 27, 2011
I enjoyed Ron Kaye’s column, “Making a true effort to connect,” in the May 22 edition of the News-Press & Leader. Kaye and I are the same age. We have lived through the same eras, and I know what he is saying and feeling about the changing world. He is correct; we can never go back to the way life was in earlier years. That is probably why every Memorial and Veterans Day I attend observances at Burbank’s McCambridge Park. The flag-waving, the patriotic music, the genuine respect shown to all service men and women, dead and living, somehow for a brief period of time transports me back to the country I grew up in, not the one I live in today.
NEWS
January 21, 2011
Editor's Note: Numerous instances of plagiarism have been discovered in Dan Kimber's “Education Matters” column, which ran in the News- Press from September 2003 to September 2011. In those columns where plagiarism has been found, a For the Record specifying the details will be appended to the piece. The founders of this great nation had the foresight to separate government and religion, reasoning that the one has no business mixing with the other. The wisdom of that separation, despite periodic efforts to establish a state religion, has been demonstrated throughout our country's history.
NEWS
July 26, 2008
The days of $200,000 campaigns for a seat on the City Council are over in Glendale, and it’s about time. The City Council on Tuesday introduced a comprehensive package of political donor restrictions that will limit contributions from individuals, corporations and labor unions to $1,000 per candidate. It might not be as drastic as some were hoping for, but this is a move that will dramatically change future elections in the city — for the better. In discussions to change what was considered a no-holds-barred approach to campaign finance, city officials often cited Burbank’s use of campaign contribution limits — where $20,000 council campaigns are among the most extravagant.
NEWS
By CARL W. RAGGIO | March 27, 2007
What if the sample ballot regarding Glendale's upcoming election was in English only? Would it make a difference on April 3rd? What if the turnout was the usual 20%? Would there be any kind of a change? And what if the ratio of absentee ballots cast was to be the same as the ballots cast at the precincts, would there be more votes to be counted? When I received my sample ballot some weeks ago and saw the size and scope of the ballot it became apparent to me that attempting to include much of the world in a local election has been taken too far. We are a city of more than 200,000 people.
NEWS
By Chuck Sambar | January 12, 2007
A friend called and asked if I plan to seek public office again. As our local election season begins to warm up, the question caused me to reflect and write this commentary. Happily, I am not up for reelection. Candidates who seek public office in order to serve their community are to be admired, appreciated, and commended for their willingness to undergo public scrutiny and to undertake a demanding challenge and a complex process. Running for office is neither easy nor much fun since it is an arduous and long journey that can frustrate, humble, insult, and/or reward.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | November 3, 2006
I don't understand why people don't vote. I am from Iowa, who's state caucus, especially for the presidential election, was a media and political circus. It was exciting but with all the media coverage, what they didn't show you was the lessons we learned before the political circus came to town. By the time I had graduated high school I had met our governor, Robert Ray, several times. My class would take field trips to the capital where we would be allowed to have a one-on-one meeting with him. We knew our representatives, local and federal.
NEWS
By: Mark R. Madler | September 16, 2005
Encouraging high school and college students to vote was among the topics discussed Thursday night at a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters Glendale/Burbank. Glendale City Clerk Ardashes Kassakhian told an audience of about 50 people at the Buena Vista branch of the Burbank Public Library that he was able recruit 110 high school students to work on his spring 2005 campaign for city clerk by visiting them in the classroom. An aggressive, one-on-one approach was a key to getting young people involved in the voting process, Kassakhian said.
NEWS
February 9, 2005
We deserve sound walls in La Canada The level of noise generated by traffic on the Foothill (210) Freeway diminishes the quality of life as well as the property values in the surrounding communities. The noise is deafening for the houses immediately adjacent to the freeway, and can be heard at least a mile away. The hillside properties suffer immensely because the sound thunders up the slopes. I cannot sit in my backyard during rush hour due to the noise, and it is getting worse by the year.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- In his longest public comment yet on the drive to kick him out of office, Mayor Gus Gomez this week called the recall effort an "abuse" that would "undermine the integrity of our local elections." Gomez made the statement in a six-paragraph response to the recall notice served on him last week by former council candidate Joe Mandoky. Mandoky is trying to recall the mayor for his decision to lower the American flag to half-staff on April 24 in commemoration of the Armenian Genocide.
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