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ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Hain | September 29, 2009
The timeliness of the Missing Piece Theatre production of “To Kill a Mockingbird” among renewed racial tensions over varying contemporary political and social issues during a time of economic uncertainty is quite apropos. The only novel by the famous recluse Harper Lee was written almost 50 years ago but continues to provide important life lessons from which anyone can still benefit. The coming-of-age story is narrated by the adult Jean Louise Finch (Penny L. Moore, who also is the show’s director, co-producer and set designer)
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Famera | March 5, 2011
By now, many of us have read “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about racial tensions in the Depression-era South. Some of us have even seen the 1962 film adaptation starring Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch. But how many of us have ever seen a stage version? Can it be done, you ask, given the novel’s various locations? Oddly enough, since the early 1990s a play based on the novel has been performed every year in Harper Lee’s hometown of Monroeville, Ala. So yes, it can be done, and can currently be seen at the Glendale Centre Theatre, which is running one very faithful, moving stage adaptation.
THE818NOW
By Brian Crosby | September 28, 2011
Since this week is Banned Books Week, and since one of my colleagues over at Glendale High School is fighting for Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" to be approved as a book to teach to advanced 11th grade English students, I thought I'd share with you my experience with banned books. When looking back on the books I've taught over the years, I realize that most of them have been banned in some part of the United States at some time.  Here are the “corrupted” books I've exposed young children to:  Erich Maria Remarque's "All Quiet on the Western Front," Richard Wright's "Black Boy," John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" and "Of Mice and Men," Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist," Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451," Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," and, of course that book of dubious merit, Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
NEWS
August 13, 2002
Local bookstore hosts discussion group tonight MONTROSE -- Author Harper Lee and her novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" will be the topic of the month at a book discussion group tonight. The group is sponsored by Once Upon a Time bookstore, and is a forum for adults to gather and share their opinions on the selected novel and author of the month. The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at the store, 2284 Honolulu Ave. Discussions are held the second Tuesday of each month.
NEWS
By: | October 12, 2005
{LDQUO}Capote" is a first-rate film that details the six years that author Truman Capote spent writing "In Cold Blood" and the Faustian bargain he made with himself that eventually ruined his life. Masterfully played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, the actor captures Capote's odd mannerisms, his fey body language and sweetly lilting voice, without resorting to burlesque humor. Capote, an out-of-the-closet homosexual and a famous Southern writer who moved freely in East Coast literary circles, travels to 1959 rural Kansas to interview the men responsible for the grisly murders of four members of a farm family, a story that has gained national notoriety.
NEWS
By Brian Crosby | March 12, 2013
Please allow me to boast. Congratulations to Matthew Benitez, Jacob Deyell, Victor Garcia, Gayane Hovsepyan and Meagan Yuen for winning Hoover's first Glendale Unified Scholastic Bowl in five years - and my first victory as coach. Glendale Unified School District is to be commended for maintaining the annual event for 23 years, even during lean financial years lately.  It's the one event that showcases the smart kids in Glendale's schools and puts these young people in the spotlight.  NBC Channel 4 weatherman Fritz Coleman has been the host for the past 17 years and does a yeoman's job with his droll sense of humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mick Caruso | September 28, 2007
Imagine a society where you were told what you could and couldn’t read. According to the American Library Association, which designates Sept. 26 through Oct. 6 as Banned Books Week, more than 3,000 titles faced censorship in schools and libraries in the United States from 2000 to 2006. For 26 years, this annual event has reminded Americans not to take their First Amendment rights lightly. Many book vendors and libraries will exercise the freedom to read with exhibits, readings and special events during the week.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | August 9, 2010
The Alex Theatre has been given one of the most challenging roles to play in the arts these days — holding steady as the economy stumbles. "We pretty much broke even for the year," said Barry McCombs, executive director of Glendale Arts, which oversees the 1,500-seat Art Deco landmark on Brand Boulevard. "That's a remarkable feat. " The organization is still putting together final figures for the fiscal year that runs July 1 to June 30, but with an annual budget of $1.6 million, it is likely to wind up $1,000 or $2,000 "on either side" of even, he added.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009
Send DATEBOOK items to Glendale News-Press, 221 N. Brand Blvd., 2nd Floor, Glendale, CA 91203 or fax to (818) 241-1975. Submissions must be received two weeks before publication. ? ONSTAGE Glendale Centre Theatre presents ?Lucky Stiff? a musical comedy by Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens at the theater, 324 N. Orange St., Glendale. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Friday; 3 and 8 p.m. Saturday; and 3 p.m. Sunday until Oct. 17. Tickets range from $21 to $26. Call (818)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Famera | March 5, 2011
By now, many of us have read “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about racial tensions in the Depression-era South. Some of us have even seen the 1962 film adaptation starring Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch. But how many of us have ever seen a stage version? Can it be done, you ask, given the novel’s various locations? Oddly enough, since the early 1990s a play based on the novel has been performed every year in Harper Lee’s hometown of Monroeville, Ala. So yes, it can be done, and can currently be seen at the Glendale Centre Theatre, which is running one very faithful, moving stage adaptation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Hain | September 29, 2009
The timeliness of the Missing Piece Theatre production of “To Kill a Mockingbird” among renewed racial tensions over varying contemporary political and social issues during a time of economic uncertainty is quite apropos. The only novel by the famous recluse Harper Lee was written almost 50 years ago but continues to provide important life lessons from which anyone can still benefit. The coming-of-age story is narrated by the adult Jean Louise Finch (Penny L. Moore, who also is the show’s director, co-producer and set designer)
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