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THE818NOW
December 17, 2012
Space fanatics and NASA obsessives: Clear your afternoon calendar. At approximately 2:28 p.m. Monday, NASA will send its twin spacecrafts Ebb and Flow hurtling into the moon at 3,760 mph -- and the space agency will have a live play-by-play of the event, hosted by scientists in the control room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. The live feed begins at 2 and ends around 2:30. Unfortunately, you will not be able to see the two crashes because the lunar crater that will be their final resting places will be in shadow at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Klemzak | September 29, 2007
Like so many Americans, I can remember exactly where I was when men first walked on the moon. It was July 20, 1969, in the middle of a night still warm from a sultry afternoon in western Pennsylvania. I was not much more than a kid then, and I had hitchhiked from my home in California to visit my elderly grandmother, who lived in a sleepy little mill town on the Allegheny River not far from Pittsburgh. I sat mesmerized on her living room floor in the glow of the television set watching men in bulky suits bounce jauntily along the stark, lunar landscape.
FEATURES
September 23, 2009
Tuesday’s paper dedicated nearly half of the front page to blowing of the shofar and the Jewish Rosh Hashana (“Celebrating the Jewish New Year,” Sept. 22). Interesting, but it did not say where they have the ram’s horn tradition from. Did Abraham perhaps bring it from Ur where the moon god Nanna reigned supreme, or Harran where they called him Sin, and where Abraham’s father is said to have died. There, moon worshipers used the same horn to represent the crescent moon.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
The two twin lunar orbiters recently launched by NASA will no longer be known as Grail A and B. A fourth-grade class in Bozeman, Mont., has renamed the probes Ebb and Flow. The class beat out more than 11,000 students from across the nation who submitted essays and potential names in the contest. NASA administrators announced the winners Tuesday at a press conference that was streamed online. Students at Emily Dickinson Elementary School revealed the two names letter by letter on placards in a cheerleader-esque chant via an online video conference.
NEWS
By Pat Grant | February 4, 2012
Lift off. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin and I were pulling G's and climbing toward the stars. And that's the closest I ever got to space travel - sharing an elevator ride with this famous voyager to the moon. I was 15 when the Russians launched the first satellite in 1957; a spindly little aluminum ball that did nothing but whirl around the Earth and beep. At night we strained our eyes to catch a glimpse of this tiny moving dot in the sky. The first feeble efforts of the U.S. to launch a satellite were almost comical; one Redstone rocket after another crashed and burned on the launch pad. Rocket scientist Werner Von Braun became that contradiction in terms: a good Nazi.
NEWS
February 15, 2005
The News-Press and Leader visited with students at Balboa Elementary School and asked: Would you like to go into outer space? Why? "Yes, because I want to see the planets and how they look in real life." AMBER SOLIS, 8 "Yes, I want to see the planets, like Jupiter, and I want to see the Earth from way up. And I want to land on the moon." PAULIE KARAMANOUKIAN, 8 "Yes, because it would be fun. I would get to see a lot of stuff, like Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Pluto, Mars and the constell- ations."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | February 25, 2012
The Forest Lawn Museum retrospective exhibition of Syd Mead's half-century career as designer, illustrator and artist is composed of more than just renderings of his curious futuristic inventions. Mead shapes a utopian future made believable. His visions of aerodynamic transportation, orbital architecture, sporting robots and interplanetary society are persuasive, delivered with ingenious perspective and fastidious detail. In his book, “Sentury II,” Mead calls auto design his first love.
NEWS
March 13, 2001
In the March 9 Glendale News-Press, there was a short announcement on Page A3 that the Pastor Jon Karn of the Church at Angeles Crest would on Sunday March 11 "tackle the difficult issue of the destiny of those who die having never heard of Jesus." I find this a fascinating concept. If we are not only going to feel that those people who know about Jesus, but fail to see him as the son of God and refuse to believe in other religious beliefs and/or religions are possibly destined for nonentry at the Pearly Gates, but that we are also going to question the destiny of those who have never heard of Jesus in the first place, then I have a big problem here.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
May 10, 1925-December 4, 2011 Patricia Haile was a gift to this world.  She was an educator, and an inspiration to learning.  She proudly raised four children (John Haile, Debbie Gabel, Terri Teebken and Bobby Haile).  She spent 32school years teaching and nurturing the students of Glenoaks Elementary School as if they were her own, prior to retiring in 1999.  She spent the summers teaching her own seven grandchildren to read, write and love learning as much as she did.  She would tell them nursery rhymes, take them to the zoo, and always end the evening looking up at the moon singing “I see the moon…” in that special singing voice only grandmothers have.  She was fortunate enough to spend time in recent years with three beautiful great-grandchildren, whom she adored.
NEWS
December 26, 2000
Claudia Peschiutta Writing about the one-year anniversary of the San Rafael Hills fire this week brought back memories of one of my most memorable dates. Billy (I'm giving him a different name because we have since broken up) and I had recently started dating when we decided to go out for an evening of swing dancing. The night was Dec. 21, 1999. The plan was to meet at The Derby in Los Feliz. Making time while I waited for Billy to get off of work, I was driving around Los Feliz and came up with a better plan -- to witness a rare astronomical event.
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NEWS
By Amy Hubbard | October 24, 2013
Using a laser, NASA has beamed data between the moon and Earth -- 239,000 miles -- at a record-shattering rate. The download rate that got NASA scientists so excited was 622 megabits per second.  We asked an expert to break it down, the Los Angeles Times reported. "This download rate is six times faster than the most recent state-of-the-art radio system from the moon," Don Cornwell, manager of the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration told The Times by email on Wednesday.
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NEWS
June 22, 2013
The largest and brightest full moon of 2013 will light up the sky this weekend when it passes the closest point to the Earth in its elliptical orbit. The so-called  supermoon  will reach its closest distance to the Earth at exactly 4:32 a.m. PDT Sunday, but both Saturday night and Sunday morning will offer good opportunities to observe the spectacle,  according to NASA.  The supermoon will be up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than a typical full moon. When the moon reaches its perigee, it will be just 221,824 miles away from Earth -- or 16,176 miles closer than usual.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
UFO watchers' eyes were set ablaze recently by reports of what looked like a stony rodent lurking among the rocks on Mars. The so-called Mars rat, spotted in an image taken last year by the NASA rover Curiosity's Mast Camera, captured imaginations even as it inspired several new parody Twitter accounts. But, just so it's clear, this Red Planet rodent - which looks rather more like a guinea pig to this reporter's eye - is no more real than the Man in the Moon. In fact, the rat likely comes from the same source as that lunar visage: the human brain.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | April 5, 2013
Hydrogen peroxide is used to clean counter tops here on Earth, but Jupiter's moon Europa may use it for a more important endeavor - to supply energy to simple life forms. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Caltech proposed the theory in a paper recently published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. "Life as we know it needs liquid water, elements like carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur, and it needs some form of chemical or light energy to get the business of life done," JPL scientist Kevin Hand said in a statement.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | April 4, 2013
Thirty-two students in aerospace, engineering and science programs in 11 different countries descended on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory last week as part of a Caltech competition to design a mission to one of Mars' two moons, Phobos or Deimos. "Watching the enthusiasm there was just really impressive," said Jason Rabinovitch, a Caltech graduate student who co-organized the program with fellow graduate student Nick Parziale. Parziale added that students, who visited JPL for a tour, had to be dragged away from each station during the tour.
THE818NOW
December 17, 2012
Space fanatics and NASA obsessives: Clear your afternoon calendar. At approximately 2:28 p.m. Monday, NASA will send its twin spacecrafts Ebb and Flow hurtling into the moon at 3,760 mph -- and the space agency will have a live play-by-play of the event, hosted by scientists in the control room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. The live feed begins at 2 and ends around 2:30. Unfortunately, you will not be able to see the two crashes because the lunar crater that will be their final resting places will be in shadow at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | February 25, 2012
The Forest Lawn Museum retrospective exhibition of Syd Mead's half-century career as designer, illustrator and artist is composed of more than just renderings of his curious futuristic inventions. Mead shapes a utopian future made believable. His visions of aerodynamic transportation, orbital architecture, sporting robots and interplanetary society are persuasive, delivered with ingenious perspective and fastidious detail. In his book, “Sentury II,” Mead calls auto design his first love.
NEWS
By Pat Grant | February 4, 2012
Lift off. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin and I were pulling G's and climbing toward the stars. And that's the closest I ever got to space travel - sharing an elevator ride with this famous voyager to the moon. I was 15 when the Russians launched the first satellite in 1957; a spindly little aluminum ball that did nothing but whirl around the Earth and beep. At night we strained our eyes to catch a glimpse of this tiny moving dot in the sky. The first feeble efforts of the U.S. to launch a satellite were almost comical; one Redstone rocket after another crashed and burned on the launch pad. Rocket scientist Werner Von Braun became that contradiction in terms: a good Nazi.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
The two twin lunar orbiters recently launched by NASA will no longer be known as Grail A and B. A fourth-grade class in Bozeman, Mont., has renamed the probes Ebb and Flow. The class beat out more than 11,000 students from across the nation who submitted essays and potential names in the contest. NASA administrators announced the winners Tuesday at a press conference that was streamed online. Students at Emily Dickinson Elementary School revealed the two names letter by letter on placards in a cheerleader-esque chant via an online video conference.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
May 10, 1925-December 4, 2011 Patricia Haile was a gift to this world.  She was an educator, and an inspiration to learning.  She proudly raised four children (John Haile, Debbie Gabel, Terri Teebken and Bobby Haile).  She spent 32school years teaching and nurturing the students of Glenoaks Elementary School as if they were her own, prior to retiring in 1999.  She spent the summers teaching her own seven grandchildren to read, write and love learning as much as she did.  She would tell them nursery rhymes, take them to the zoo, and always end the evening looking up at the moon singing “I see the moon…” in that special singing voice only grandmothers have.  She was fortunate enough to spend time in recent years with three beautiful great-grandchildren, whom she adored.
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