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By Melanie Hicken | September 16, 2009
CITY HALL — The Los Angeles-based Museum of Neon Art could move into a vacant, city-owned building across from the Americana at Brand under a proposed agreement that, if successful, would represent one the largest cultural jolts to downtown in years. The City Council on Tuesday is scheduled to take up the proposed letter of intent, which would kick off formal negotiations with the niche museum for the space at 216 S. Brand Blvd. The vacant building, which once housed a Salvation Army branch and a Rite Aid, would afford the museum a new permanent space for its venerable collection of neon signs and art after using a temporary spot in downtown Los Angeles for roughly two years.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 4, 2012
The wind-down of local redevelopment threatens to undo an agreement to bring the Museum of Neon Art from downtown Los Angeles to Glendale, which could leave the venerable curator of all things neon without a home. MONA had shut down its Los Angeles space last year after the Glendale City Council, acting in its dual role as the now-defunct Redevelopment Agency, approved spending $5.2 million to move the museum into a renovated property across from the Americana at Brand. But that could all be undone as officials decide which past agreements to drop, and which ones to keep, a process that has unnerved museum officials.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
The Los Angeles-based nonprofit Museum of Neon Art recently put some of its collection on display at the future site of its new home across from the Americana at Brand. The City Council last year entered into negotiations with the museum for a deal that would bring the nonprofit into the city-owned property at 216 S. Brand Blvd. Last week, the council approved an expanded proposal that would require the city to buy an adjacent building. The museum’s collection of vintage and contemporary neon art includes the historical Grauman’s Chinese Theatre dragon and the iconic Brown Derby sign.
NEWS
July 4, 2002
Janine Marnien Legend has it that the Oak of Peace on the grounds of the Verdugo Adobe is where Mexican forces decided to surrender to the United States on Jan. 11, 1847. The tree is no longer there, but the spot where it once may have stood is marked with a plaque reminiscent of the occasion. The Verdugo Adobe is on the list of National Register of Historic Places, and owned by Glendale. It is set to become a museum later this year. The Days of the Verdugos Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | January 19, 2008
A familiar chubby face will greet visitors at the Burbank Historical Society’s Gordon R. Howard Museum. A 6-foot-tall Bob’s Big Boy statue, decked out in his red-and-white checked overalls, was moved from a dusty garage to its new home on Wednesday. The statue, in close to perfect condition, of the boy who inspired the double-deck hamburger was a gift to Arnold Peterson who was Bob Wian’s partner in the Bob’s Big Boy restaurant chain. It has been in the family’s garage for about 25 years, said Peterson’s son, Ron Peterson.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2007
In honor of firefighters and agencies who worked to safeguard the museum and other nearby cultural and educational attractions during the recent Griffith Park fire, the Autry National Center extends a special invitation to everyone on Sunday, May 27, for a special free admission day. "We owe a great deal to all of the men and women who managed to control the fire and safeguard the Autry National Center, and we want to open our doors and invite...
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | February 19, 2008
Descendants of troops who fought in the American Revolutionary War and early American history enthusiasts gathered Monday to celebrate the 276th anniversary of George Washington’s birth at a Glendale library and museum dedicated to Washington’s era. The event was held at the American Heritage Library and Museum on South Central Avenue, and was hosted by the Sons of the Revolution in the State of California — a 115-year-old nonprofit...
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | January 3, 2009
A holiday stained-glass exhibit with pieces more than 500 years old wasn’t just impressive because of the craftsmanship of its panels, visitors said, but also because of what they depicted. The seasonal exhibit at Forest Lawn Museum, which runs through Jan. 11 and holds the largest collection of stained glass in North America, includes images of the life of Jesus Christ. “It’s God’s words in stained glass,” said visitor Lone Rasmussen, an Antelope Valley resident who was standing in front of an illuminated, 16th-century window depicting the birth of Jesus.
NEWS
November 22, 2002
Karen S. Kim Forest Lawn Memorial Park and Mortuary in Glendale will celebrate Christmas this year by showing off its rare collection of brilliant and colorful stained-glass windows dating to 1903. The park's museum will display seven pieces of its windows collection, which includes more than 100 stained-glass pieces chronicling the life of Jesus Christ. For Christmas, the museum chose just seven pieces of the detailed glass works to chronicle Jesus' birth and early life.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 30, 2014
Construction is on track for the Museum of Neon Art, which was topped off with a 19-foot-tall red neon statue of a female diver last week, one of the many elements museum officials hope will help lure visitors to Glendale's first full-fledged art museum. The $5.2-million construction project to revamp the exterior of the 10,000-square-foot building that will house the museum is expected to be complete by the end of April or early May, said Phil Lanzafame, Glendale's economic development director.
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NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | March 21, 2014
The Doctors House Museum in Brand Park has seen a steady increase in visitors since 2009, added a new vintage clothing curator and will bring back some successful events from the past, according to a new report about the museum - the first compiled in four years. The number of annual visitors rose from 1,585 in 2009 to 2,678 in 2012, but dipped slightly to 2,411 last year, said Assistant Museum Director Peter Rusch during a meeting of the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Commission on Monday.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 1, 2014
Lisa Gonzalez ducked under a tent used to catch bugs in a Glendale backyard and reached her arm into a small bottle at the tip of the trap. She pulled out what looked like a clump of dirt. As the insect expert began to unravel the bundle, dozens of bug carcasses spewed into her hand as she picked through a crumpled-up spider web. Spiders often set up camp in the 30 bug-catching tents the Natural History Museum has erected throughout Los Angeles, Glendale and Burbank for a three-year project studying insects in the urban environment.
NEWS
By Kirk Silsbee | January 27, 2014
Lester Bowie, the late Art Ensemble of Chicago trumpeter, once dissected how Louis Armstrong purveyed his art in American culture: "The true revolutionary that's out waving a gun in the streets is never effective; the police just arrest him. But the police don't ever know about the one that smiles and drops a little poison in their coffee. " Bowie might have had Alfredo Ramos Martinez, one of the pioneer modernist Mexican painters, in mind. If he's not as famous as Rivera, Kahlo, Orozco or Siqueiros, Martinez's work is worth knowing.
NEWS
By Ruth Sowby | January 7, 2014
After being dark in December, the Doctors House Museum in Brand Park has resumed its Sunday tours. This authentically restored Queen Anne-Eastlake-style home was built in 1888. The two-story house originally stood at 921 E. Wilson Ave. in central Glendale. With the help of volunteer greeter and Glendale Historical Society board member Margaret Hammond , a dozen visitors signed up for the first tour of the new year this past Sunday. Volunteer docent Laura Crook guided the visitors room by room as they viewed the home's period furniture and artifacts.
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian | December 10, 2013
Dozens of art enthusiasts gathered at the Forest Lawn Museum in Glendale for a panel discussion featuring female artists and a state senator, with their focus being women in the arts and ways to push legislators to prioritize funding for arts education. The Southern California artists, along with State Sen. Carol Liu (D-La Cañada Flintridge), discussed the role of women in the arts during a forum hosted by the Glendale Commission on the Status of Women and the Forest Lawn Museum in connection with the museum's ongoing exhibit titled “LA Women: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow.” The exhibit, showing at the Forest Lawn Museum until Jan. 5, features 24 female artists from different time periods who've been influential in local art culture and history, some of whom pursued art despite a lack of access to an arts education.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | November 13, 2013
Five years, so far, in the making - and facing many obstacles along the way - the Museum of Neon Art had its official groundbreaking Wednesday morning in Glendale, incorporating a fitting touch, a neon shovel. The museum, which has bounced around Los Angeles since 1981, is one step closer to putting down roots across the street from the Americana at Brand. Once it opens, it will become Glendale's first full-fledged art museum. “It's been a long haul moving from place to place and finally we're going to have a home here in Glendale,” said David Svenson, president of the museum's board of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kirk Silsbee | September 5, 2013
Our national art consciousness has long had at least a vague sense of contemporary art (and a few individual artists) in Asia. Japanese and, more recently, mainland Chinese artists have been part of America's collective art conversation and, typically, California leads the way: MOCA presented a Murakami retrospective a few years ago and Ali Weiwei's giant bronze animal heads were displayed at LACMA. But even on the West Coast, few art viewers have a handle on present-day Korean art. In a small but pointed way, the Pacific Asia Museum has taken steps to remedy that deficiency.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | July 20, 2013
One year into the $9.5-million renovation and seismic retrofit of Glendale's Brand Library & Art Center, the original 1904 mansion of city father Leslie C. Brand is starting to look like itself again. Drab "popcorn" ceilings installed during the estate's 1956 conversion to a library have been stripped away and replaced with hand-painted Victorian stencil work that was recreated from originals hidden for more than half a century. PHOTOS: Brand Library renovations continue Plain white walls are now back to their vintage deep blues, greens and reds.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Glendale art lovers and civic boosters alike can be excused this week for having a certain glow about them: At long last, the Museum of Neon Art has been given the green light to begin work on its new home. On Tuesday, the City Council approved a $1.6-million contract to revamp the city-owned structure at 216 S. Brand Blvd. into a luminous, glass-sheathed light-box of a museum. Those familiar with the project know all too well that the path has not been smooth. The museum, founded in 1981, moved out of its downtown Los Angeles digs in June 2011, lured by the promise of an improved property here financed with redevelopment money.
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