Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsMystery
IN THE NEWS

Mystery

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 2012
TAMPA, Fla. - Though Tuesday was a day filled with frustrations - filled with clueless guards and curt hall monitors - I solved the photo floor pass mystery Wednesday. It didn't start looking like that was going to happen. I called the Republican National Convention media office Wednesday afternoon, and was immediately referred to the operations number. In turn, the operations people gave me the local numbers for Joe Keenan, the director of the U.S. Senate Press Gallery, the institution that vetted our press-level credentials.
NEWS
By Maria Hsin, maria.hsin@latimes.com | February 3, 2012
Los Angeles County coroner's officials on Friday ordered additional tests for the autopsy of an 11-month-old baby who died Wednesday after experiencing breathing problems at a Burbank day care center. The cause of death and other details were still unknown pending the autopsy report, but police said they do not suspect foul play. At about 3:15 p.m. Wednesday, police and paramedics responded to a call about a baby not breathing at a licensed daycare facility in the 200 block of West Santa Anita Avenue, Sgt. Darin Ryburn said.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
Of the many indignities visited upon Fern Dell, the garden oasis in Griffith Park, one remains a mystery: Who turned off the water? Starlets and health-seekers lined up in the 1920s to fill jugs from the spring that fed this 20-acre fantasia of ferns, footpaths and picturesque bridges. They thought it was a fountain of youth. Now, only the lower stream beds run, and the pools lie motionless and gummy. You might think the city would do something. But instead, Friends of Griffith Park - the nonprofit group that stepped in three years ago to try to reverse the 95-year-old garden's long, sad decline - is on the case.
NEWS
March 11, 2002
Marshall Allen LA CANADA FLINTRIDGE -- Local mystery writer Jerrilyn Farmer will speak on how to get published at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the La Canada Flintridge library, 4545 Oakwood Ave., La Canada Flintridge. Farmer is the author of the best-selling Madeline Bean mysteries, which include "Dim Sum Dead," and "Sympathy for the Devil." She has earned many mystery honors, including the Macavity Award and nominations for three Agatha Awards. Farmer will talk about her mystery series, how to get published and will give tips on writing the strongest possible opening scene.
NEWS
By By Vince Lovato | December 21, 2005
Anshika Niraj, 9, uses her literary skills to win third annual national Cyberchase Online Contest.GLENDALE -- Anshika Niraj, 9, read every Nancy Drew mystery. It seems to have paid off. Anshika combined her interest in mysteries with some self-taught detective skills to become one of 10 children nationwide to solve a KCET/PBS-sponsored online mystery in the third annual Cyberchase Online Contest. Anshika, a student in Pat Ashley's Verdugo Woodlands Elementary School fourth-grade class, determined that Baskerville was the evil Hacker's accomplice in stealing the key to the Castleblanca power station.
NEWS
January 3, 2002
Tim Willert GLENDALE -- For almost a month since she was found at a bus stop in La Canada Flintridge, she was a mystery to all who met her. The woman, referred to as Jane Doe in a bulletin released by the Crescenta Valley Sheriff's Department, was unable to provide authorities with any useful information about her identity. "You can have a conversation with her," Det. Cynthia Gonzales said. "But if you ask her questions about her life she just doesn't remember."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2006
From Maripat Donovan, the creator and producer who brought you 'Late Nite Catechism' and the sequel, 'Late Nite Catechism 2' comes the all-new, all ho-ho--ho holiday special 'Sister's Christmas Catechism: The Mystery of the Magi's Gold' at the Brentwood Theatre from Dec. 5 through Dec. 17. It's CSI: Bethlehem in Sister's Christmas Catechism. Sister tackles the question that has been puzzling historians throughout the ages: What ever happened to the Magi's gold? Sister engages her audience, and together they solve the mystery of what happened to the Magi's gold through a forensic examination of the nativity scene as Sister hunts under the manger and over camel humps.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2006
Movies need not venture off to a galaxy far, far away in order to take the audience into a world of wonder and mystery. Sometimes, a step back into the past reveals thrills long lost in the bombast of 21st-century Hollywood moviemaking. As the tumult of this summer's blockbusters fade, "The Illusionist" materializes with a cunning sleight-of-hand to reveal the truly magical. "The Illusionist," written and directed by Neil Burger, is set in Vienna during the early 1900s. There, Eisenheim (Edward Norton)
NEWS
May 6, 2008
The Glendale News-Press visited R.D. White Elementary School and asked students, ?What have you learned about solving a mystery?? ? ?It takes a while to solve a mystery. It?s kind of hard to solve it. You have to have clues, and you have to look everywhere. You have to look around.? JOSEPH JAYOMA, 9 Glendale ? ? ?It takes very long. If you want to solve a mystery in a book, you need to read the whole book. You have to look for clues and ask people who you think did it.?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lyda truick | December 26, 2009
Montrose resident Pete Goodman seems to keep himself quite busy. A former journalist for the U.S. Air Force, he has also worked as an executive show director for a Japanese theme park and theater arts professor, but has settled down into the refined art of writing a good mystery. ?Smoking Frog Lives!? is Goodman?s first mystery novel, and the series kicks off with a bang! Set in modern-day southern Mexico, surrounding the ancient Mayan ruins of Palenque. Nick Michaels, former military man and private investigator, has given up his former profession for a life of archaeology, on site with USC archaeologist and professor Dr. Max Herrmann.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Deborah Netburn | January 22, 2014
After 10 years of wheeling around Mars , NASA's Opportunity rover has discovered a rock shaped like a jelly doughnut that seems to have appeared out of thin Martian air. "One of the things I like to say is Mars keeps throwing things at us," Steven Squyres, principal investigator for the Mars Exploration Rover Mission, said in a presentation   describing Opportunity's first decade on Mars as well as the mysterious rock. In late December, Opportunity snapped an image of a rocky outcropping on the Red Planet with no rock the size and shape of a jelly doughnut, the Los Angeles Times reports . But 12 days later, when the rover took another picture of the same area, the jelly doughnut-like rock was there.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 8, 2013
Editor Dan Evans wants everyone to know that Ron Kaye and the Glendale News-Press are not negatively biased toward Assemblyman Mike Gatto . (Stop the Presses, Oct. 5). So Evans writes yet another article about a non-issue, repeating, yet again, the same ridiculously over-the-top, laughable claims by a fringe group. It is no mystery to me what is going on here. I doubt there is a mystery to Evans, either. He is keeping the story alive, and therefore not doing truth or justice any favors.
NEWS
August 30, 2013
Authorities have not ruled out murder in the mysterious case of a woman who was fatally struck Thursday on the 210 Freeway in Sylmar. According to witnesses, a red car was being driven erratically when a woman either fell out, was pushed or jumped out of a passenger-side door and was hit by at least two other vehicles before her body came to a rest in the fast lane, said  Los Angeles Police Department  Lt. Paul Vernon. The driver of the car never stopped, the Los Angeles Times reported . “Every minute this person remains at large and unidentified, our suspicions lean toward malice, foul play and murder,” Vernon said.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
Of the many indignities visited upon Fern Dell, the garden oasis in Griffith Park, one remains a mystery: Who turned off the water? Starlets and health-seekers lined up in the 1920s to fill jugs from the spring that fed this 20-acre fantasia of ferns, footpaths and picturesque bridges. They thought it was a fountain of youth. Now, only the lower stream beds run, and the pools lie motionless and gummy. You might think the city would do something. But instead, Friends of Griffith Park - the nonprofit group that stepped in three years ago to try to reverse the 95-year-old garden's long, sad decline - is on the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | April 14, 2013
Shane Carruth made an impressive debut in 2004 with "Primer," which cost $7,000 and is surely the most complexly structured time-travel film ever made. For that matter, it may be one of the most complexly structured films ever made, period. Carruth seemed to have fallen off the map shortly thereafter. Now, after nine years, his second feature, "Upstream Color," opens this week. There is no real protagonist here. Carruth opts for multiple points of view; sometimes the transitions are so sudden and the durations so short that the movie suggests an "objective" point of view.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynne Heffley | October 26, 2012
Entering the Glendale Centre Theatre feels like a cozy step back in time. Visitors are greeted by memorabilia from the theater's 65-year history, furnishings from the past and a casual familial warmth later underscored by Executive Producer Tim Dietlein's pre-show banter with the audience. The family ambience of this 430-seat theater-in-the-round, with its cheery red upholstered seats and warm wood paneling, isn't anything new. Dietlein's grandparents founded the theater in 1947 and Dietlein, who runs the operation with his wife Brenda, grew up in it. It isn't surprising, then, that comfortable, familiar entertainment is a specialty of the house.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
Re: “Mystery Sierra hiker found,” Oct. 9. What a great story. A story with mystery and a happy ending. Wouldn't it be wonderful if the Sierra peak was named Taylor Peak? Benla Bennet Glendale
NEWS
August 31, 2012
TAMPA, Fla. - Though Tuesday was a day filled with frustrations - filled with clueless guards and curt hall monitors - I solved the photo floor pass mystery Wednesday. It didn't start looking like that was going to happen. I called the Republican National Convention media office Wednesday afternoon, and was immediately referred to the operations number. In turn, the operations people gave me the local numbers for Joe Keenan, the director of the U.S. Senate Press Gallery, the institution that vetted our press-level credentials.
NEWS
By Dan Evans and By Dan Evans | August 29, 2012
TAMPA, Fla. -- After trekking up and down yet another stairwell at the Tampa Bay Times Forum with my photo gear, I prayed I had finally reached my goal: a floor photo pass. "Oh no, honey, I'm sorry. I have no idea what you're talking about," said an older, blue-eyed woman in a blue shirt whose cop-like demeanor and cold expression belied her words. I doubt I'm being uncharitable if I doubted her concern. Credentials are color-coded at the RNC: Red is the most restrictive pass - level four and above only - while gray is an all-access pass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | May 18, 2012
My top-10 films from last year are slowly making their way to home video, the latest being this mysterious relationship drama from Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami (“Taste of Cherry,” “Crimson Gold”) - certainly his most accessible film for Westerners. First of all, it's primarily in English, with a few English-subtitled scenes in French and Italian. Secondly, it is much closer in tone and technique to European cinema than to the Iranian films that make it to the U.S. Juliette Binoche plays a nameless character who seeks a meeting with author James Miller (William Shimmel, an opera singer making his film debut)
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|