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NEWS
March 28, 2001
Joyce Rudolph NORTHWEST GLENDALE -- In honor of Fine Arts Month, the eighth-grade Commercial Art Class at Toll Middle School is showing its Native American Designs at an exhibit that's open to the public from 6:30 to 8 tonight. Arineh Avanessian has created a Hopi doll on watercolor paper, said Judith Bakly, Commercial Art Class teacher. Students all dye their paper with a natural liquid -- tea, coffee, spices or henna. Avanessian dyed her paper with saffron, which casts a yellow hue. "I've never seen the saffron," Bakly said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007
In recognition of the 400th anniversary of the meeting of European and Native American peoples, a new exhibition at The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens will look at how North American Indians have been depicted in art, primarily from the 1500s through the 1800s. The exhibition, "Legacy and Legend: Images of Indians from Four Centuries," runs from June 9 to Sept. 2, in the MaryLou and George Boone Gallery. "For centuries European-trained artists created art for audiences that knew little about Indians, and so their images often romanticized them and focused on the more dramatic," says guest curator Kathryn Hight.
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Kindergarten students at Verdugo Woodlands Elemen- tary School celebrated "Feast Day" at school Wednesday, during which students put on Pilgrim and Native American outfits and ate vegetable soup, friendship salad and corn bread. Prior to the feast, Tujunga resident Kimberly-Ann Talbert showed students authentic Native American gourds, spoons, bowls, baskets, rain sticks and jewelry. Talbert, an Armenian Amer- ican who has attended ceremonies with Navajo elders on Big Mountain, conveyed to students the notion of "Mitakuye Oyacin," or "all my relations," which means that all living things are related, Talbert said.
NEWS
December 6, 2003
Native American storyteller, actress, author and poet Geri Keams spoke to Fremont Elementary School students Friday about Native American myths and legends during two student assemblies at the school. The school's Parent-Teacher Assn. sponsored the event. Keams read from her two children's books, "Grandmother Spider Brings the Sun" and "Snail Girl Brings Water." Keams shared with students the legends and myths of many Native American tribes, including creation stories and animal tales.
NEWS
June 22, 2007
Ne'ayuh is proud to announce a celebration of the Summer Solstice this Saturday, June 23, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event will feature storytellers and Native American music by Carlos Reynosa and his family. The NASA Starlab, an inflatable, portable planetarium, will also be on display. There will be an arts and crafts marketplace, Native American food and hands-on activities for kids of all ages. The celebration is a great family activity that is free. It will take place in the Angeles National Forest, 14 miles north of the 210 freeway in La Cañada, at the corner of the Angeles Crest Highway (highway 2)
NEWS
April 7, 2003
Life was found on the Honolulu Avenue frontier Sunday. Frontier Day was celebrated in the Montrose Shopping Park. From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., as Native-American storytelling mesmerized some, others watched champion trick ropers create designs with their rope. Children got their faces painted and took free pony and wagon rides through the streets as Native- American hoop dancing wowed passersby. Of course, it wouldn't have had quite the same feel without The McPossums Fiddle Trio playing somewhere in the background.
NEWS
November 23, 2004
Darleene Barrientos As long as the main course doesn't change, the first-grade students in Diane Schoenrock's class don't mind if the bird's companions on the Thanksgiving dinner table are clams, pumpkin seeds and smoked salmon. The Columbus Elementary School students donned Native American headbands and paper feathers Friday to enjoy a meal of dried fruits, turkey, smoked salmon, clams and Native American fry bread. As he sampled the bread, Richard Simonian, 6, said he liked the fish, the turkey and pumpkin seeds, but did not want to sample the dried prune or the clams.
NEWS
May 13, 2002
Marshall Allen LA CANADA FLINTRIDGE -- Proposed legislation that would ban Native American school mascots would also open the door for the elimination of mascots like the La Canada High School Spartan. Assembly Bill 2115, sponsored by Assemblywoman Jackie Goldberg (D-Los Angeles), would eliminate all Native American mascots like Redskins, Apaches, Chiefs or Braves. Native American team names should not be used because there are currently people who identify with them, Goldberg Legislative Assistant Ilona Turner said.
NEWS
By Bianca P. Gallegos | October 6, 2006
It was a celebration of nature when the Haramokngna American Indian Center near Mt. Wilson held its annual Fall Equinox flute circle last Saturday morning. "We celebrate each season because each season brings something something new to life," said Kat High, program coordinator at the Center. The more than 150 attendees started the ceremony with a pine nut pancake breakfast. On site were workshops that ranged between learning how to make a Native American necklace to educational workshops that taught visitors about the Indian culture.
NEWS
June 19, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum Two local legislators are betting on a longshot to help California's horse-racing industry. Assemblywoman Carol Liu (D-La Canada Flintridge) and state Sen. Bob Margett (R-La Crescenta) are urging Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to consider the plight of racetracks in his budget negotiations, including allowing slot machines at the tracks. Santa Anita Park is in Liu's and Margett's districts. Liu sponsored a Women in Horseracing day at the Arcadia park in April.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Lynne Heffley | March 7, 2014
In "Stand-Off at HWY #37," Vickie Ramirez's deeply felt new play presented by Native Voices at the Autry National Center, a protest against a highway slated to cut across sovereign Indian land sparks issues of identity, cultural tradition, difficult historic truths and present-day hardball politics. Bulldozers are scheduled to arrive for the construction of a public highway on land reclaimed from a Haudenosaunnee (Iroquois) reservation in upstate New York by the United States government, reportedly due to the recent unearthing of an obscure historical document, but widely assumed to be the result of yet another broken treaty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kirk Silsbee | October 28, 2013
The modern art of the 20th Century didn't arrive fully formed without antecedents. In the case of the Art Deco movement of the 1920s, the style drew on the geometry, sleekness and minimalism of classicism. While Deco may have had a primary stronghold in Germany's Bauhaus, its gospel spread far and wide, adapting to local customs and usage. In Southern California, we sometimes take for granted the design elements that reflect the Southwest in our Deco. Whether it's a Hermosa Beach house that nicks the Mission style, Indian visages on the Mayan Theatre exterior, cornstalks in an ornamental frieze on Long Beach's Lafayette Hotel, the wavy lines of the Argyle Hotel in West Hollywood, or the Wiltern's diagonal gingerbread - modernist architects and designers have reinforced the connection between Indians and the city of Los Angeles.
FEATURES
October 20, 2009
What about the Native Americans? Just a short comment and thank you relative to the comment by Albert Knight on Oct. 17 titled, “Mass killings happened here, too.” While we talk about the Holocaust, the Cambodian and Armenian genocides and sympathize, in varying degrees, with the Jews, the Cambodians and the Armenians, we rarely, if ever, discuss, or even bring up, the Native American genocide! As Knight indicates, we white Europeans, by way of government policy and otherwise, sought to exterminate the Indians, as we called them, by stealing their land, raping their women and slaughtering them by the millions!
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | March 27, 2008
Alexandra Zarate?s family had watched her spend hours upon hours making tiny dots with acrylic paint for an art project in Judith Bakly?s commercial design class at Toll Middle School. On Wednesday night, her family got to see the finished product ? the dots represented the beads in a painting that depicted a colorful necklace worn by the Iroquois Indians. Alexandra?s art work, and that of her classmates, was exhibited at the school for community members and parents to see. Students in the invitation-only art class had spent several weeks studying the art of various Native American tribes and creating two-dimensional pieces that included authentic design elements from that tribe, Bakly said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Kim | September 5, 2007
History may chronicle events past but Cynthia Alarcón’s photographs both document and capture the emotion behind her personal discovery, mission architecture and the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. Alarcón, artist and manager of production home planning at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, will exhibit her 20-year compilation of photographs, “One Woman’s Journey” at the Burbank Creative Arts Center Gallery opening Friday and continuing until Sept.
FEATURES
By Mary O'Keefe | July 20, 2007
Three teenage visitors from Leech Lake Reservation American Indian reservation in South Dakota and a 23-year-old visitor from Sacramento joined the service at St. George's Episcopal Church in La Cañada Sunday as their Los Angeles trip came to an end. The teens were part of a mission that was brought to the Los Angeles area by Reverend Robert Two Bulls. Two Bulls, a minister that now serves in Minnesota, is originally from the Pine Ridge Reservation in Red Shirt, South Dakota. He was first introduced to the St. George congregation when he served as associate pastor at the church several years ago. During his time as pastor he spoke of his tribe, Oglala Lakota, and how they lived in Red Shirt.
NEWS
June 22, 2007
Ne'ayuh is proud to announce a celebration of the Summer Solstice this Saturday, June 23, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event will feature storytellers and Native American music by Carlos Reynosa and his family. The NASA Starlab, an inflatable, portable planetarium, will also be on display. There will be an arts and crafts marketplace, Native American food and hands-on activities for kids of all ages. The celebration is a great family activity that is free. It will take place in the Angeles National Forest, 14 miles north of the 210 freeway in La Cañada, at the corner of the Angeles Crest Highway (highway 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007
In recognition of the 400th anniversary of the meeting of European and Native American peoples, a new exhibition at The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens will look at how North American Indians have been depicted in art, primarily from the 1500s through the 1800s. The exhibition, "Legacy and Legend: Images of Indians from Four Centuries," runs from June 9 to Sept. 2, in the MaryLou and George Boone Gallery. "For centuries European-trained artists created art for audiences that knew little about Indians, and so their images often romanticized them and focused on the more dramatic," says guest curator Kathryn Hight.
NEWS
April 13, 2007
The Haramokngna American Indian Cultural Center recently held a Spring Equinox celebration to mark the beginning of a season of renewal. The event also commemorated the 10th year since Haramokngna was established as a Cultural Center. The celebration included a flute performance and potluck luncheon of several native dishes such as acorn bread, sage tea and chia lemonade. In addition, a special ceremony was performed to renew a set of sun markings on the ground in front of the Cultural Center.
NEWS
By Bianca P. Gallegos | October 6, 2006
It was a celebration of nature when the Haramokngna American Indian Center near Mt. Wilson held its annual Fall Equinox flute circle last Saturday morning. "We celebrate each season because each season brings something something new to life," said Kat High, program coordinator at the Center. The more than 150 attendees started the ceremony with a pine nut pancake breakfast. On site were workshops that ranged between learning how to make a Native American necklace to educational workshops that taught visitors about the Indian culture.
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