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By Mary O’Keefe | July 19, 2009
LA CAÑADA — Forty years ago on July 20, Neil Armstrong took that unforgettable step onto the moon as the world watched. It was one of the seminal achievements of technology, imagination and courage — one that captured a nation. While Armstrong’s boot may have been the first to land on the lunar surface, to get to that point, it took hundreds of dedicated scientists and engineers who received only a collective share of the spotlight. Some of those technocrats were at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which had sent robotic explorers long before Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins climbed into their Apollo 11 capsule.
NEWS
June 22, 2000
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- When Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969, an 11-year-old Jimmy Rogan sat transfixed by the grainy images on his great aunt's television set. "I remember looking out the window that night just in awe at the idea that men from the planet Earth were walking on the moon," Rogan said. "It was right out of Buck Rogers." As a congressman, U.S. Rep. James Rogan (R-Glendale) got to meet with Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Mike Collins -- the Apollo 11 astronauts who had become heroes to him. The encounter took place in July 1999, at a breakfast celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing.
NEWS
August 13, 2004
As Glendale residents, there are lessons we can learn from Neil Armstrong and Lance Armstrong. Two men who in very similar ways demonstrated the character of the community we must become. Thirty-five years ago on July 20, the world stood transfixed at a unique experience that made humanity pause and think. It was a moment when we recognized that we share a uniqueness on our side of the cosmos that there is only one mankind, one human species who share more qualities than many care to recognize today.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
Assemblyman Paul Krekorian has been appointed to serve on the Assembly Select Committee on Hate Crimes, his office announced this week. The committee was established in 2001 to address the growth of hate crimes statewide and nationally, Krekorian said. Krekorian sought the appointment knowing that his constituency, which includes Glendale and Burbank voters, is no stranger to violence provoked by ethnic tension, he said. "I will be able to bring the experience of coming from an area that is often beset with ethnic tension and violence, and that experience will inform my ability to provide input to statewide policy," he said.
NEWS
May 20, 2005
1960: Bank deposits hit all-time high in Glendale, at $165,406,730, according to the Glendale Clearing House Assn. 1960: The Glendale Police Department moves into a new building on the corner of Isabel Street and Wilson Avenue as part of the city's streamlining of city office procedures 1961: A three-year crime record is shattered, when murders, rapes, robberies and other serious crimes increase to 1,565 1961:...
THE818NOW
February 9, 2012
Clay Lacy, a veteran pilot, air race champion and aviation entrepreneur who introduced the first corporate jet service in the western United States, received the Howard HughesMemorial Award Wednesday night from the Aero Club of Southern California. Lacy, 79, a prominent figure at Van Nuys Airport whose career has spanned almost  60 years, was presented the club's highest honor at a banquet in downtown Los Angeles. The award places Lacy in the ranks of other famous Hughes recipients such as Jack Northrop, Jimmy Doolittle,  Chuck Yeager, Ed Heinemann, Neil Armstrong, Burt Rutan and Bob Hoover.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
Reasoning? I figured I should respond to Bob Tanabe's letter of July 9. For those who don't recall, that was the one in which he suggested that women shouldn't have the right to vote because they lack the "logical reasoning process" and that a Kerry/Edwards ticket would take away our SUVs. I can see why Mr. Tanabe doesn't like liberals. After all, look what liberals and liberal-thinking have forced us to endure: not just women's suffrage, but Social Security, Medicare, the 40-hour work week, sick leave, vacation pay, the Interstate Highway System, the national parks, public libraries, auto safety laws, the Center for Disease Control, those embarrassing Clinton budget surpluses, the University of California system, Neil Armstrong walking on the moon, toxic waste cleanup, reduced smog, the California Water Project, and civil rights for people with foreign-sounding names.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
Gary Moskowitz Nine-year-old Melissa Ramirez will admit she doesn't know everything there is to know about the U.S. Constitution, but she does know what freedom means. Melissa and about 150 Cerritos Elementary School students on Wednesday joined more than 1,000 Southern California students at a Pledge Across America event at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills. Celebration U.S.A., a nonprofit educational organization, teamed with Forest Lawn to host the event at Forest Lawn's Hall of Liberty.
NEWS
By Pat Grant | February 4, 2012
Lift off. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin and I were pulling G's and climbing toward the stars. And that's the closest I ever got to space travel - sharing an elevator ride with this famous voyager to the moon. I was 15 when the Russians launched the first satellite in 1957; a spindly little aluminum ball that did nothing but whirl around the Earth and beep. At night we strained our eyes to catch a glimpse of this tiny moving dot in the sky. The first feeble efforts of the U.S. to launch a satellite were almost comical; one Redstone rocket after another crashed and burned on the launch pad. Rocket scientist Werner Von Braun became that contradiction in terms: a good Nazi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Klemzak | September 29, 2007
Like so many Americans, I can remember exactly where I was when men first walked on the moon. It was July 20, 1969, in the middle of a night still warm from a sultry afternoon in western Pennsylvania. I was not much more than a kid then, and I had hitchhiked from my home in California to visit my elderly grandmother, who lived in a sleepy little mill town on the Allegheny River not far from Pittsburgh. I sat mesmerized on her living room floor in the glow of the television set watching men in bulky suits bounce jauntily along the stark, lunar landscape.
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NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 19, 2009
LA CAÑADA — Forty years ago on July 20, Neil Armstrong took that unforgettable step onto the moon as the world watched. It was one of the seminal achievements of technology, imagination and courage — one that captured a nation. While Armstrong’s boot may have been the first to land on the lunar surface, to get to that point, it took hundreds of dedicated scientists and engineers who received only a collective share of the spotlight. Some of those technocrats were at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which had sent robotic explorers long before Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins climbed into their Apollo 11 capsule.
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NEWS
August 3, 2007
Assemblyman Paul Krekorian has been appointed to serve on the Assembly Select Committee on Hate Crimes, his office announced this week. The committee was established in 2001 to address the growth of hate crimes statewide and nationally, Krekorian said. Krekorian sought the appointment knowing that his constituency, which includes Glendale and Burbank voters, is no stranger to violence provoked by ethnic tension, he said. "I will be able to bring the experience of coming from an area that is often beset with ethnic tension and violence, and that experience will inform my ability to provide input to statewide policy," he said.
NEWS
August 13, 2004
As Glendale residents, there are lessons we can learn from Neil Armstrong and Lance Armstrong. Two men who in very similar ways demonstrated the character of the community we must become. Thirty-five years ago on July 20, the world stood transfixed at a unique experience that made humanity pause and think. It was a moment when we recognized that we share a uniqueness on our side of the cosmos that there is only one mankind, one human species who share more qualities than many care to recognize today.
NEWS
June 22, 2000
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- When Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969, an 11-year-old Jimmy Rogan sat transfixed by the grainy images on his great aunt's television set. "I remember looking out the window that night just in awe at the idea that men from the planet Earth were walking on the moon," Rogan said. "It was right out of Buck Rogers." As a congressman, U.S. Rep. James Rogan (R-Glendale) got to meet with Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Mike Collins -- the Apollo 11 astronauts who had become heroes to him. The encounter took place in July 1999, at a breakfast celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing.
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