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NEWS
April 18, 2008
It is not too surprising that oral communication has finally been moved to the end of the City Council meeting, since it?s been in the works, off and on, for years (?Mayor Drayman faces first salvo,? Thursday). This move will undoubtedly lessen public comment, which is probably OK since not much attention is paid to those not financially well-off enough to foster new high-rises, new condos, increases in city management salaries, public land giveaways and so on. In Glendale, and probably in other cities, open government is without meaning and is merely two words.
FEATURES
April 18, 2008
It is not too surprising that oral communication has finally been moved to the end of the City Council meeting, since it’s been in the works, off and on, for years (“Mayor Drayman faces first salvo,” Thursday). This move will undoubtedly lessen public comment, which is probably OK since not much attention is paid to those not financially well-off enough to foster new high-rises, new condos, increases in city management salaries, public land giveaways and so on. In Glendale, and probably in other cities, open government is without meaning and is merely two words.
NEWS
By Eric Horwitz | March 16, 2006
GLENDALE ? It's expected to be partly cloudy in the area today, but the sun will shine on the need for open government. The League of Women Voters Glendale/Burbank will present "Openness in Government: Looking for the Sunshine," a forum designed to shed light on public access to government and the challenges it faces. The forum will feature keynote speaker Barbara Blinderman, an expert on California's Ralph M. Brown Act,and a variety of panelists from the Glendale and Burbank city councils, the Glendale Unified School District Board of Education and press on the subject of maintaining an open government.
NEWS
March 14, 2005
Do you agree with the current council's push for downtown housing and development? No, because most, if not all, of the development is being done without any infrastructure improvement such as appropriate parking and street widening. In addition, most of the development, such as the Americana at Brand, is uncalled for and will greatly add to the present downtown traffic mess. Finally, I don't believe any of the housing is affordable to most of the people in this area.
NEWS
March 11, 2002
Karen Kreider's letter claiming that those who petition government are "mean spirited" and engage in "vitriolic hyperbole" requires a response. She seems confused regarding the roles of the City Council and the school board; they are separate institutions with separate responsibilities. The city is not responsible for education and had nothing to do with building a library except for facilitating the eligibility that allowed the district to apply for matching funds under a specific state program.
NEWS
October 27, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum A few months ago, Gary Wesley checked in with the Secretary of State's office to find out which propositions lacked ballot arguments, either for or against. Wesley, an attorney from Mountain View, has made it his personal crusade since 1980 to make sure every state proposition has two ballot arguments. So when he found out that nobody was arguing against Proposition 59, a proposed constitutional amendment that addresses public records and open meetings, Wesley signed up. "I've been writing ballot arguments for years and years," Wesley said.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
Reps. Adam Schiff and David Dreier joined U.S. Sens. Dianne Feinstein, of California, and Jon Kyl, of Arizona, Wednesday in introducing legislation in both the House and Senate to criminalize the construction or financing of border tunnels. As a former federal prosecutor who prosecuted drug trafficking and illegal immigrant smuggling, Schiff said he recognized the need to give prosecutors new tools to fight such crimes. Recently, U.S. border officials found a 2,400-foot tunnel stretching from Tijuana, Mexico to San Diego at California's southern border.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum Mayor Bob Yousefian touched off a 1st Amendment debate when he told citizens at this week's City Council meeting that the public comment period will be done at the end of the meeting. On Tuesday night, Yousefian pushed the public comment period to the end of the meeting for the second consecutive week, preventing residents from speaking about items not on the agenda until nearly 11 p.m. When some speakers questioned the move, Yousefian said he will continue to do so until after the Sept.
NEWS
March 10, 2003
For many weeks now, those of us without personal axes to grind have been subjected to comments, written and oral, by those of the political right, the middle, and the left respecting events, situations and controversial legislative proposals taking place in the City Council chambers. Council members, particularly councilmen Quintero and Yousefian, have been, in the majority, castigated for their ideas and actions by just about every level of Glendale society.
NEWS
December 12, 2007
Absentee system raises questions One can certainly understand that a campaign headquarters would send out ballot applications (?Ballot system could change,? Monday). One cannot understand that the city is allowing completed ballot applications to be returned to the same campaign headquarters, and further they are allowed under law to ?hold? the ballots for up to 72 hours. Talk about golden opportunities for fraud, mishandling and conflict-of-interest activities. Where is common sense?
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FEATURES
April 18, 2008
It is not too surprising that oral communication has finally been moved to the end of the City Council meeting, since it’s been in the works, off and on, for years (“Mayor Drayman faces first salvo,” Thursday). This move will undoubtedly lessen public comment, which is probably OK since not much attention is paid to those not financially well-off enough to foster new high-rises, new condos, increases in city management salaries, public land giveaways and so on. In Glendale, and probably in other cities, open government is without meaning and is merely two words.
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NEWS
April 18, 2008
It is not too surprising that oral communication has finally been moved to the end of the City Council meeting, since it?s been in the works, off and on, for years (?Mayor Drayman faces first salvo,? Thursday). This move will undoubtedly lessen public comment, which is probably OK since not much attention is paid to those not financially well-off enough to foster new high-rises, new condos, increases in city management salaries, public land giveaways and so on. In Glendale, and probably in other cities, open government is without meaning and is merely two words.
NEWS
December 12, 2007
Absentee system raises questions One can certainly understand that a campaign headquarters would send out ballot applications (?Ballot system could change,? Monday). One cannot understand that the city is allowing completed ballot applications to be returned to the same campaign headquarters, and further they are allowed under law to ?hold? the ballots for up to 72 hours. Talk about golden opportunities for fraud, mishandling and conflict-of-interest activities. Where is common sense?
NEWS
By Eric Horwitz | March 16, 2006
GLENDALE ? It's expected to be partly cloudy in the area today, but the sun will shine on the need for open government. The League of Women Voters Glendale/Burbank will present "Openness in Government: Looking for the Sunshine," a forum designed to shed light on public access to government and the challenges it faces. The forum will feature keynote speaker Barbara Blinderman, an expert on California's Ralph M. Brown Act,and a variety of panelists from the Glendale and Burbank city councils, the Glendale Unified School District Board of Education and press on the subject of maintaining an open government.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
Reps. Adam Schiff and David Dreier joined U.S. Sens. Dianne Feinstein, of California, and Jon Kyl, of Arizona, Wednesday in introducing legislation in both the House and Senate to criminalize the construction or financing of border tunnels. As a former federal prosecutor who prosecuted drug trafficking and illegal immigrant smuggling, Schiff said he recognized the need to give prosecutors new tools to fight such crimes. Recently, U.S. border officials found a 2,400-foot tunnel stretching from Tijuana, Mexico to San Diego at California's southern border.
NEWS
March 14, 2005
Do you agree with the current council's push for downtown housing and development? No, because most, if not all, of the development is being done without any infrastructure improvement such as appropriate parking and street widening. In addition, most of the development, such as the Americana at Brand, is uncalled for and will greatly add to the present downtown traffic mess. Finally, I don't believe any of the housing is affordable to most of the people in this area.
NEWS
October 27, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum A few months ago, Gary Wesley checked in with the Secretary of State's office to find out which propositions lacked ballot arguments, either for or against. Wesley, an attorney from Mountain View, has made it his personal crusade since 1980 to make sure every state proposition has two ballot arguments. So when he found out that nobody was arguing against Proposition 59, a proposed constitutional amendment that addresses public records and open meetings, Wesley signed up. "I've been writing ballot arguments for years and years," Wesley said.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum Mayor Bob Yousefian touched off a 1st Amendment debate when he told citizens at this week's City Council meeting that the public comment period will be done at the end of the meeting. On Tuesday night, Yousefian pushed the public comment period to the end of the meeting for the second consecutive week, preventing residents from speaking about items not on the agenda until nearly 11 p.m. When some speakers questioned the move, Yousefian said he will continue to do so until after the Sept.
NEWS
March 10, 2003
For many weeks now, those of us without personal axes to grind have been subjected to comments, written and oral, by those of the political right, the middle, and the left respecting events, situations and controversial legislative proposals taking place in the City Council chambers. Council members, particularly councilmen Quintero and Yousefian, have been, in the majority, castigated for their ideas and actions by just about every level of Glendale society.
NEWS
March 11, 2002
Karen Kreider's letter claiming that those who petition government are "mean spirited" and engage in "vitriolic hyperbole" requires a response. She seems confused regarding the roles of the City Council and the school board; they are separate institutions with separate responsibilities. The city is not responsible for education and had nothing to do with building a library except for facilitating the eligibility that allowed the district to apply for matching funds under a specific state program.
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