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Pit Bull

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NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | September 28, 2010
SOUTH GLENDALE — A roaming pit bull was shot and killed Tuesday by Glendale police responding to calls that the dog had trapped clients in a rehab facility, officials said. Police arrived to the 300 block of Mission Road after receiving a call that a 60-pound pit bull had chased a client from the Glendale Adventist Drug and Alcohol Center into the building and was scratching at the door, officials said. The clients feared being bitten and didn't want to exit the building, prompting calls to the police, Lt. Gary Montecuollo said.
NEWS
November 6, 2001
Amber Willard GLENDALE -- The search for a man who allegedly led Glendale Police on a high-speed chase ended at a Burbank home, with the episode culminating in the shooting of a dog. "One dog lunged and growled at an officer and the officer retreated. He fired one shot at the dog and it backed off," Glendale Police spokesman Sgt. Bruce Fox said of the incident that occurred about 10 p.m. Sunday in the 3100 block of Jeffries Avenue. A second dog, also a pit bull, later lunged at the officers and followed one of them outside.
NEWS
By: | October 11, 2005
A Newport Beach police sergeant wounded a pit bull after the dog reportedly charged toward him Sunday, police said. The sergeant was on patrol at about 3 a.m. near West Ocean Front and Summit Street when he saw a light that appeared to be emanating from a tent on a West Newport beach, Newport Beach Police Sgt. Bill Hartford said. The sergeant approached the tent to tell the occupant, Jose Lopez, 35, of Newport Beach, that camping is not allowed. As he walked toward the tent, the sergeant noticed an unleashed 80-pound pit bull near the tent, Hartford said.
NEWS
July 6, 2001
A sincere "thank you" to the many people who came to our rescue after the pit bull attack. On June 21 at 4 p.m., my wife started on a daily walk with our small terrier, named Ginger. On her usual route only one block from home at the intersection of Lexington and Kenilworth, my wife and dog were confronted with this unfriendly beast. Within seconds, there was a terrifying fight going on, my wife trying to pick up Ginger to get her out of the way, the pit bull jumping up and grabbing Ginger any place he could.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | December 13, 2010
DOWNTOWN — Television chef and daytime host Rachael Ray used an appearance Monday at the Americana at Brand to promote more than just Monte Cristo sandwiches and teriyaki noodles. Ray, a longtime pit bull owner and rescue animal advocate, partnered with Ainsworth Pet Nutrition in 2008 to launch Rachael Ray Nutrish, a pet food line that donates 100% of proceeds to animal shelters across the country. By the end of 2010, roughly $1.4 million had been generated, Ray said. "I can't believe there are still puppy mills," she said Monday after presenting a $7,500 check to Animal Advocates Alliance, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that brought 10 shelter animals for a "pop-up" pet adoption event concurrent with Ray's book signing for her latest release, "Look + Cook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 28, 2008
Forget Judge Judy. Glendale has its own fearsome judge on the bench, and she’s at the top of her game. Glendale resident and TV judge Cristina Perez received the Emmy for Outstanding Legal/Courtroom Program for her show, “Cristina’s Court,” during the National Television Academy’s 35th Annual Daytime Entertainment Emmy Awards last week at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. “I’m a judge,” Perez said. “Every case is real. They are Small Claims Court cases, and we issue real, binding decisions.
NEWS
August 10, 2005
Fred Ortega A motion introduced by L.A. County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich in support of state legislation regulating specific breeds of dogs was unanimously approved by the County Board of Supervisors Tuesday. With the motion, the county joins several private and public agencies throughout the state in supporting Senate Bill 861, introduced by state Sen. Jackie Speier (D-San Francisco). The bill would allow cities and counties to regulate specific breeds of dogs through mandatory spay/neuter programs and other breeding requirements.
NEWS
By CHARLES UNGER | July 21, 2006
If a kennel worker gets bitten, can that worker sue the dog owner or is that one of the risks you take when you sign up to work at a kennel? This incident took place in 2000 starring Marta Priebe as the kennel worker and Russell Nelson as the dog owner. Priebe worked at a kennel where Nelson took his dog. One day the dog mauled Priebe's foot and ankle causing nerve damage. Priebe's complaint alleges that Nelson never told her about his dog's violent tendencies. Nelson's dog was not a biting virgin, as it had previously attacked Nelson and one other man sending them both to the hospital.
NEWS
May 19, 2008
Hateful letter must not go unchallenged The vitriol of hate oozing from every paragraph in Martik Abramian?s letter (?We need a day of awareness instead,? Mailbag, May 13) is sadly depraved and deeply hurtful. (Nearly as appalling is the News-Press? decision to dignify this speciously prejudiced screed by printing it.) Abramian?s homophobic diatribe cannot go unchallenged; that blatant discrimination against gays and lesbians is advocated is a line of thinking that must be vigorously rebutted.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 4, 2011
Media coverage, myths and pop culture - whatever the reason, operators of animal shelters in Burbank and Pasadena say pit bulls and Chihuahuas continue to dominate as the pets most commonly abandoned. The trend hasn't let up for several years, prompting exasperation among shelter operators, who've been unable to stem the tide. At the Pasadena Humane Society, where spokeswoman Ricky Whitman said the two dog breeds make up 50% of the shelter's population, administrators plan to offer free bi-weekly spay and neuter clinics for Chihuahua owners.
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NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | December 13, 2010
DOWNTOWN — Television chef and daytime host Rachael Ray used an appearance Monday at the Americana at Brand to promote more than just Monte Cristo sandwiches and teriyaki noodles. Ray, a longtime pit bull owner and rescue animal advocate, partnered with Ainsworth Pet Nutrition in 2008 to launch Rachael Ray Nutrish, a pet food line that donates 100% of proceeds to animal shelters across the country. By the end of 2010, roughly $1.4 million had been generated, Ray said. "I can't believe there are still puppy mills," she said Monday after presenting a $7,500 check to Animal Advocates Alliance, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that brought 10 shelter animals for a "pop-up" pet adoption event concurrent with Ray's book signing for her latest release, "Look + Cook.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | September 28, 2010
SOUTH GLENDALE — A roaming pit bull was shot and killed Tuesday by Glendale police responding to calls that the dog had trapped clients in a rehab facility, officials said. Police arrived to the 300 block of Mission Road after receiving a call that a 60-pound pit bull had chased a client from the Glendale Adventist Drug and Alcohol Center into the building and was scratching at the door, officials said. The clients feared being bitten and didn't want to exit the building, prompting calls to the police, Lt. Gary Montecuollo said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 28, 2008
Forget Judge Judy. Glendale has its own fearsome judge on the bench, and she’s at the top of her game. Glendale resident and TV judge Cristina Perez received the Emmy for Outstanding Legal/Courtroom Program for her show, “Cristina’s Court,” during the National Television Academy’s 35th Annual Daytime Entertainment Emmy Awards last week at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. “I’m a judge,” Perez said. “Every case is real. They are Small Claims Court cases, and we issue real, binding decisions.
NEWS
May 19, 2008
Hateful letter must not go unchallenged The vitriol of hate oozing from every paragraph in Martik Abramian?s letter (?We need a day of awareness instead,? Mailbag, May 13) is sadly depraved and deeply hurtful. (Nearly as appalling is the News-Press? decision to dignify this speciously prejudiced screed by printing it.) Abramian?s homophobic diatribe cannot go unchallenged; that blatant discrimination against gays and lesbians is advocated is a line of thinking that must be vigorously rebutted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan James | October 12, 2007
H ow do you take your violence? Head-on, fists flailing? Government-sponsored assassination? The subtle abuse of an inside jab? Mafia magic with a jack-slammer Uzi? From now until Christmas, Hollywood has a serial killer’s bag of treats in store for you. So if you have insider information, prepare to connect the dots. If you like your popcorn raw, here are a handful of ways to feed the inner beast. The heaviest hitters in the fall-winter line-up of new releases are the movies that play by the rule, ‘Violence is golden’.
NEWS
By CHARLES UNGER | July 21, 2006
If a kennel worker gets bitten, can that worker sue the dog owner or is that one of the risks you take when you sign up to work at a kennel? This incident took place in 2000 starring Marta Priebe as the kennel worker and Russell Nelson as the dog owner. Priebe worked at a kennel where Nelson took his dog. One day the dog mauled Priebe's foot and ankle causing nerve damage. Priebe's complaint alleges that Nelson never told her about his dog's violent tendencies. Nelson's dog was not a biting virgin, as it had previously attacked Nelson and one other man sending them both to the hospital.
NEWS
By: | October 11, 2005
A Newport Beach police sergeant wounded a pit bull after the dog reportedly charged toward him Sunday, police said. The sergeant was on patrol at about 3 a.m. near West Ocean Front and Summit Street when he saw a light that appeared to be emanating from a tent on a West Newport beach, Newport Beach Police Sgt. Bill Hartford said. The sergeant approached the tent to tell the occupant, Jose Lopez, 35, of Newport Beach, that camping is not allowed. As he walked toward the tent, the sergeant noticed an unleashed 80-pound pit bull near the tent, Hartford said.
NEWS
August 10, 2005
Fred Ortega A motion introduced by L.A. County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich in support of state legislation regulating specific breeds of dogs was unanimously approved by the County Board of Supervisors Tuesday. With the motion, the county joins several private and public agencies throughout the state in supporting Senate Bill 861, introduced by state Sen. Jackie Speier (D-San Francisco). The bill would allow cities and counties to regulate specific breeds of dogs through mandatory spay/neuter programs and other breeding requirements.
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