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NEWS
March 13, 2003
Darleene Barrientos In a tape played to the jury in the Glendale Police sexual-harassment trial, one of the plaintiffs in the case admitted lying about her whereabouts to dispatch and to socializing with fellow officers when she was supposed to be working. "Having this much time to look back, I think I was an idiot," said Renae Kerner, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, in the 2001 taped interview with Lt. Jonathon Perkins. The interview was part of the Police Department's investigation into reports of officers sleeping while on duty.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | October 24, 2009
GLENDALE — Attorneys representing plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit against Grand View Memorial Park have announced a $3.8-million settlement agreement. A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge granted preliminary approval of the settlement until a fairness hearing is held and the plaintiffs have a chance to comment on the proposed agreement, according to court records. “The biggest goal of the class action is to normalize the cemetery,” said attorney Paul Ayers, who represents plaintiffs in the lawsuit.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 12, 2013
A U.S. District Court judge has ruled that the federal court system has jurisdiction to hold Turkish banks accountable for seizing land from Armenians during the Armenian Genocide. This ruling was attached to judge Dolly M. Gee's dismissal of a lawsuit brought against the Central Bank of Turkey and T.C. Ziraat Bankasi, which is a Turkish agricultural bank, as well as the Republic of Turkey seeking roughly $65 million in damages. Rajika Shah, one of the lead attorneys for the plaintiffs, said that despite the dismissal, the judge's ruling handed down late last month was important because it established that if a government takes its own citizens' property during human-rights violations, it isn't immune from being sued in the U.S. courts.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | September 11, 2009
LOS ANGELES — Most of the 150 civil lawsuits filed against Metrolink for the 2005 Glendale derailment that killed 11 passengers have been settled, attorneys said Thursday in Superior Court. Settlement amounts for the mediated cases were not available because most of the documents have been sealed. After the plaintiffs agreed to the dollar amounts, they dismissed their cases against Metrolink, court records show. Only 17 lawsuits remain active, attorneys said. Documents were sealed to protect the privacy and privileges of the plaintiffs, according to court records.
NEWS
July 15, 2005
Lawsuit filed against Nestle Three citizens of the West African nation of Mali are suing Nestle SA, Archer Daniels Midland Co. and Cargill Inc., alleging the firms and their subsidiaries benefited from child slave labor at cocoa bean plantations in Ivory Coast. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Thursday, was brought on behalf of three unnamed "John Doe" plaintiffs identified as former child slaves. The complaint, which alleged violations of U.S. federal laws against slavery, trafficking, forced labor and torture, among others, seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages.
LOCAL
By Chrisopher Cadelago | June 16, 2009
BURBANK — As their attorneys shuffle between four similar lawsuits that allege the Walt Disney Co. has for decades contaminated groundwater with cancer-causing chromium 6 and other toxic chemicals, stories of ill health from the plaintiffs are beginning to emerge. In the latest lawsuit, filed last week in Los Angeles Superior Court by the Sacramento-based firm Kershaw Cutter & Ratinoff LLP on behalf of 16 people with strong ties to the Rancho District, the plaintiffs claim Disney dumped wastewater contaminated with hexavalent chromium from its on-site cooling systems down the centerline of Parkside Avenue, toward Parish Place and across Riverside Drive into the so-called Polliwog, an 11-acre parcel near the studio’s Imagineering facilities.
NEWS
December 8, 2001
Amber Willard GLENDALE -- A lawsuit with the potential to award millions of dollars to heirs of Armenian life insurance policy holders is set to move forward. The suit, in which La Canada Flintridge resident Martin Marootian is the lead plaintiff, has filtered through the the U.S. District Court system since it was filed in 1999. Earlier this week, a judge ruled in favor of the plaintiffs, who are suing New York Life Insurance for payment of policies taken out by family members who died during the Armenian Genocide.
NEWS
June 5, 2004
Darleene Barrientos It took more than a year to reach a verdict after a sexual-harassment lawsuit was filed against the Glendale Police Department. Getting a decision on an appeal of that verdict could take twice as long. Officers Katie Frieders, Renae Kerner, Jamie Franke and Carla Haupt, and Community Service Officer Linda Daidone, filed the original lawsuit in 2001. It alleged that they were subjected to sexual harassment by their supervisors, then punished and retaliated against when they rejected romantic advances.
NEWS
November 1, 2003
Darleene Barrientos A judge rejected several motions Friday in a lawsuit filed by former Glendale Humane Society board members, but allowed them a little more time to amend their request to place a temporary restraining order on the board president. Burbank Superior Court Judge Michael S. Mink ordered the plaintiffs in the case to amend their challenge against Wilhelm Vargas, who is the Glendale Humane Society's board president, within 10 days, or the case will be thrown out. "The court, by its ruling, has given us a chance to file an amendment to our complaint.
LOCAL
By Tania Chatila and Robert S. Hong | September 22, 2006
GLENDALE — A Los Angeles Superior Court judge denied a Metrolink request on Thursday to throw out more than 100 cases against the agency in connection with a 2005 train wreck that killed 11 people and injured nearly 200 others, officials said. There are 113 active lawsuits against Metrolink in connection with the incident, and 29 plaintiffs have settled, said attorney Edward R. Pfiester, who represents the wife of the conductor killed in the Glendale crash, among others. Judge Emilie Elias denied two motions made by Metrolink on Thursday — one to essentially throw out the cases, and another motion to uphold federal regulations over state law on the use of the controversial "push-pull" method, in which a locomotive pushes the train from behind in one direction but pulls in the other direction, Pfiester said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 30, 2014
Despite filing court documents this week opposing Glendale's request to dismiss a federal lawsuit calling for the removal of a city statue honoring women used as sex slaves by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II, the law firm representing those opposed to the memorial has resigned. The change comes after Mayer Brown, considered a top 20 global law firm, was criticized by several in the legal industry for taking on the case in the first place since the plight of the former sex slaves, known as comfort women, has been recognized by international historians and government officials in Japan and the United States.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | February 28, 2014
A law firm was recently hired by Glendale Community College officials to help the school on an “as-needed” basis with redistricting matters. College officials began a discourse over redistricting a little over two years ago when consultants warned college officials in February 2012 that an at-large election process could leave the college vulnerable to lawsuits connected to the California Voting Rights Act. The 2002 act aims to protect the...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 21, 2014
A Glendale resident, along with a Los Angeles resident and a nonprofit group, filed a lawsuit this week asking a federal judge to force the city of Glendale to remove a controversial statue in a public park that honors women victimized by the Japanese government during World War II. The lawsuit is the latest attempt to remove the 1,100-pound statue for so-called “comfort women,” which was installed in July. Supporters of comfort women say the Japanese military coerced an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 women from Korea, China and other countries to work as prostitutes in military brothels against their will.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | May 31, 2013
An attorney who claims his rights were violated when a Glendale police officer had an affair with his wife after he was arrested on, and ultimately acquitted of, criminal charges is asking an appellate court to reverse a lower court's decision to throw out his case. Attorneys for Robert Yousefian filed an opening brief Thursday in U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals contending that the U.S. District Court erred when it determined he had failed to raise "triable issues" on whether his constitutional rights were violated by the city.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 12, 2013
A U.S. District Court judge has ruled that the federal court system has jurisdiction to hold Turkish banks accountable for seizing land from Armenians during the Armenian Genocide. This ruling was attached to judge Dolly M. Gee's dismissal of a lawsuit brought against the Central Bank of Turkey and T.C. Ziraat Bankasi, which is a Turkish agricultural bank, as well as the Republic of Turkey seeking roughly $65 million in damages. Rajika Shah, one of the lead attorneys for the plaintiffs, said that despite the dismissal, the judge's ruling handed down late last month was important because it established that if a government takes its own citizens' property during human-rights violations, it isn't immune from being sued in the U.S. courts.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, The Valley Sun | October 20, 2010
The 28 Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientists suing the federal government over what they say are new invasive security screening procedures are calling for comments about space shuttle security by U.S. Solicitor Gen. Neal Katyal to be stricken from the Supreme Court record. In making his case that background checks involving medical records, personal finances and sexual preference are necessary to guarantee NASA security, Katyal told justices on Oct. 5 that holders of a JPL clearance enjoy extensive access privileges outside the La Cañada Flintridge facility.
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | May 8, 2010
CITY HALL — A Glendale police officer filed a lawsuit against the city this week, claiming he was unfairly demoted because of his friendship with another officer suing the Police Department for discrimination. In January, four Armenian officers and a former officer filed a federal lawsuit against the department, alleging repeated on-the-job racial discrimination and harassment. This week, police Officer Marc Mendoza filed a separate lawsuit in Los Angeles County Superior Court alleging that he was recently demoted from detective to patrol officer because of his friendship with Sgt. Vahak Mardikian, one of the five plaintiffs in the other case.
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | December 31, 2009
GLENDALE — Metrolink has agreed to pay roughly $39 million to settle all but one of the lawsuits filed against the agency in the aftermath of a January 2005 derailment that killed 11 passengers on the Glendale border, an attorney for the plaintiffs said Wednesday. Of the 186 complaints filed against the agency in the wake of the accident, all but one of the suits have been resolved, said Jerome Ringler, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs. All 11 wrongful death lawsuits have been settled, and 15 of the 16 serious-injury lawsuits have been resolved.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | October 24, 2009
GLENDALE — Attorneys representing plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit against Grand View Memorial Park have announced a $3.8-million settlement agreement. A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge granted preliminary approval of the settlement until a fairness hearing is held and the plaintiffs have a chance to comment on the proposed agreement, according to court records. “The biggest goal of the class action is to normalize the cemetery,” said attorney Paul Ayers, who represents plaintiffs in the lawsuit.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | October 15, 2009
GLENDALE — Metrolink has agreed to pay $30 million to settle 90% of the lawsuits filed against it in the aftermath of a January 2005 derailment that killed 11 passengers on the Glendale border, attorneys for the plaintiffs announced Wednesday. The plaintiffs will receive millions in compensation for their cases against Metrolink, their attorney, Jerome Ringler, said. After the crash, 150 complaints were filed. Of those, nine of the 11 wrongful death lawsuits have been settled, Ringler said.
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