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THE818NOW
February 9, 2012
Disney's official fan club, D23 , is making Mars a red-carpet planet - the club is lining up special access opportunities for the world premiere of director Andrew Stanton's space-spanning epic “John Carter.” The world premiere of “John Carter,” which stars Taylor Kitsch as Edgar Rice Burrough's Warlord of Mars, will be held Feb. 22 at the Regal Cinema at L.A. Live. Starting Wednesday, D23 will offer members chances for special access to the premiere's red carpet as well as an adjacent viewing area.
NEWS
February 5, 2002
Why didn't somebody tell me I was voting for someone from another planet in the last City Council election? It's obvious that Councilman Dave Weaver certainly doesn't come from planet Earth when he is quoted in reference to the recent Planning Commission appointment, "This councilman does not like to be lobbied" and "Those of you who sent me those letters and e-mails, don't ever do it again," ("Weaver sends out a warning to...
FEATURES
May 15, 2009
The summer blockbuster movie season is starting to heat up, with movies as “X-Men,” “Star Trek” and “Harry Potter” opening soon. What films, currently showing or not, do you recommend for people seeking “alternative” choices? The best movie that I have seen recently is the Disney production of “Earth.” It is beautifully done! James Earl Jones is the narrator and the musical score “soars” with every scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | September 2, 2011
Superheroes have always intrigued Scott Cranford, who spent much of his boyhood drawing them, nearly certain he'd grow up to join their ranks. Born in Burbank, Cranford lived in Connecticut from age 4 until he was a senior in high school, when he returned to California to pursue his dreams in the superhero industry. At age 19, he entered the entertainment field, going to work on Batman films or as a stand-in for actors such as Ron Pearlman, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Christopher Walken.
NEWS
January 11, 2002
Regarding Mr. Steve Mead's letter in your Jan. 8 paper. Dear Mr. Mead: Come on, wake up. I was raised in the Montrose and La Crescenta area since I was 4 years old, and I'm sure glad that I did not know anyone with your thoughts. Why don't you wake up. Were you raised in a closet or bubble? Many people don't like meat (therefore eat other things). Just because you don't, doesn't mean that you have to downgrade the float for the once-a-year fun parade.
NEWS
January 8, 2002
The Big Boy stands proudly on the Glendale float, his double-decker hamburger raised in his fist, almost as if in salute. The Big Boy doesn't seem to realize that the concoction he is about to eat epitomizes a diet that will quite possibly end his life prematurely. If the diet doesn't kill him, he still stands a likelihood that his latter years will be spent in misery as a victim of heart disease. Well, there's always bypass surgery. The Big Boy's cherubic face also does not seem to reflect any concern about the devastation to the planet brought about by the production of meat, which has been very well documented.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | August 3, 2006
One of the current world issues that is beginning to command more attention in my classroom is global warming. It is becoming increasingly hard to ignore, despite the fact that our leaders in Washington tell us not to worry, and that only "further study" is required. It's understandable that teenagers are not activated by a topic that warns of future consequences — their lives are filled with such warnings and they are inclined to turn a deaf ear to them. It is less understandable that the people we elect to lead us into the future are similarly inclined.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | July 28, 2006
One of the current world issues that is beginning to command more attention in my classroom is global warming. It is becoming increasingly hard to ignore, despite the fact that our leaders in Washington tell us not to worry, and that only "further study" is required. It's understandable that teenagers are not activated by a topic that warns of future consequences ? their lives are filled with such warnings and they are inclined to turn a deaf ear to them. It is less understandable that the people we elect to lead us into the future are similarly inclined.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
Gary Durrett As you read this, I will be in Lawrence, Kan., reuniting with some other old hippies for a biannual head count. In my absence, here's a priceless suggestion for this weekend's bill of fare. Take it to heart, and let me know how things went. First and foremost, I am an unapologetic automotive enthusiast. I find the act of driving the closest thing that I'll ever get to flying, and I love it. To find a solitary open stretch of twisting highway, adorned with any number of spectacular vistas available to Californians, represents my version of heaven on earth.
NEWS
November 15, 2000
Jeff Keating Some days I think I haven't learned much about life, the universe and everything during my 38 years on the planet, but when I really think about it, there's a few things I've picked up that are kind of useful. Here, then, are ... THE THINGS I HAVE LEARNED My son Colin, who is 9, is smarter than I am. I won't tell you the whole story about how the video camera, TV and VCR became an electronic film editing station overnight, but suffice to say I'm hoping to retire at 40 as one of the founding investors in colinkeatingvideo.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 26, 2014
The Kepler mission, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, has discovered 715 new planets, NASA announced Wednesday. The newly verified planets orbit 305 stars, revealing multiple-planet systems like the Earth's solar system. The discovery marks a significant increase in the number of known small-sized planets more like Earth than previously identified planets outside of the solar system, according to the space exploration agency. "That these new planets and solar systems look somewhat like our own, portends a great future when we have the James Webb Space Telescope in space to characterize the new worlds,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.
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NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | November 19, 2013
Mars is a cold and dusty place with no known life. But scientists believe that the planet was once more like Earth, with a warm climate that supported oceans and lakes. The NASA spacecraft MAVEN will explore the Mars' atmosphere in a quest to find out how the planet could have experienced such a drastic change in climate. MAVEN, or Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, launched into space on Monday from Cape Canaveral, Fla. at 10:28 a.m. PST from an Atlas V rocket. The spacecraft is expected to reach Mars orbit in September 2014.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 30, 2013
Jeweler and watchmaker Garo Anserlian first started working on timepieces over 40 years ago, and his work has followed him from Beirut to Montrose - but Anserlian never expected his work would one day be connected to another planet. Since 2004, Anserlian, owner of Executive Jewelers and Executive Clock Gallery on Honolulu and Ocean View avenues in Montrose, has created custom mechanical watches that are based on a day on Mars, which is 24 hours and 39 1/2 minutes. Even as new technology has offered other options for the scientists and engineers who were the original customers for the special watches, Anserlian said his Mars connection has brought him new business from collectors and space enthusiasts.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | August 14, 2013
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is known for its exploration of space, but the La Cañada Flintridge facility is starting to focus its gaze back to Earth. Three new missions scheduled to launch in 2014 will examine soil moisture, wind, and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The data obtained from the orbiters sent on these missions can be used by farmers, meteorologists and others in understanding how the planet works, scientists said. PHOTOS: NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visits JPL “Last year was the year of Mars,” said JPL Director Charles Elachi on Tuesday.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
Planet-hunting scientists were dealt a major blow Wednesday when NASA officials announced that a crucial wheel on the Kepler space telescope had ceased to function and that the craft had been placed in safe mode. Even as NASA officials raised the possibility that they could get the telescope back up and running, scientists began mourning the potential loss of a spacecraft that they said had fundamentally altered our understanding of alien planets in the Milky Way - and Earth's place in an increasingly crowded galaxy.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 7, 2013
NASA's planetary science division - responsible for sending the rover Curiosity to Mars - will get an unexpected budget hike of $123 million for the rest of 2013. These additional funds will be used to continue planetary exploration, officials said. As part of a temporary spending bill signed by President Obama on Tuesday, Congress approved a budget of roughly $1.41 billion for the planetary science division, compared to about $1.19 billion in Obama's requested budget. "That means Congress values [the]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | January 18, 2013
The car-sized rover Curiosity had a clean landing on Mars five months ago. But planetary missions didn't always run so smoothly at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Mariner 3, a probe sent to do a first-ever flyby in 1964, failed to get to the Red Planet during a stressful time at the space agency. Engineers were under intense pressure to beat Russia in the space race. Another spacecraft launched three weeks later, Mariner 4, eventually made it to Mars. It returned the first grainy close-up images of a foreign terrain.
NEWS
By Gary Huerta | August 16, 2012
Dear God, You're probably wondering why I never reach out to you. Come to think of it, being divine and all, I'm sure you know the truth. I've been distant because of the image your more devout followers have painted. No offense, God, but those at the top of your command have made you out to be pretty closed-minded. If I am to believe those who claim to be closest to you - I'm talking about the gang in the funny hats and robes - you have no tolerance for alternative lifestyles, and you love doling out eternal penalties for making mistakes.
THE818NOW
March 6, 2012
When Walt Disney Co. 's "John Carter" opens in theaters this weekend, the science-fiction adventure may encounter obstacles as formidable as its hero faces on Mars. The film brings to the big screen a century-old fantasy tale, from Tarzan creator Edgar Rice Burroughs , that has inspired generations of filmmakers and science fiction writers including James Cameron , George Lucas , Arthur C. Clarke and Ray Bradbury . Its sweeping scope and $250-million budget suggest director Andrew Stanton 's ambition to create a cinematic adventure on a par with movies such as "Avatar" and "Star Wars" - works that were informed by Burroughs' original pulp fiction.
THE818NOW
February 9, 2012
Disney's official fan club, D23 , is making Mars a red-carpet planet - the club is lining up special access opportunities for the world premiere of director Andrew Stanton's space-spanning epic “John Carter.” The world premiere of “John Carter,” which stars Taylor Kitsch as Edgar Rice Burrough's Warlord of Mars, will be held Feb. 22 at the Regal Cinema at L.A. Live. Starting Wednesday, D23 will offer members chances for special access to the premiere's red carpet as well as an adjacent viewing area.
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