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Pollution

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NEWS
July 14, 2004
Wanting clean air and clean water does not make you an environmentalist any more than saluting the flag makes you a patriot. Environmentalism is an ideology -- a religious ideology that worships nature above man. When searching for the meaning of an ideology, it is irrelevant to look at its least consistent practitioners. One must read the works of the movements leaders. So, Mr. Morrison and company, it would do you well to actually read the works of the leading environmentalists.
NEWS
February 21, 2000
Mark Abramowitz Glendale is quietly making a decision that will affect the health and safety of each Glendale resident for years to come. Faced with the need to control pollution from the aging Grayson power plant, the city wants to use an outdated mode of pollution control called Selective Catalytic Reduction when new, state-of-the-art technologies are available. Worse, the citys proposed SCR system will use thousands of gallons per day of hazardous ammonia.
NEWS
April 13, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- A city meeting with air quality regulators over the environmental costs of boosting Grayson power plant's production was postponed Tuesday. The meeting, which would have been held at the Diamond Bar offices of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, has been postponed to April 24. Ritch Wells, the city's spokesman, explained that district officials wanted time to review emissions information before deciding on the city's case.
NEWS
May 5, 2001
Glendale soon might be doing its part to help keep the lights on for neighboring cities, but it will have an impact on city finances and pollution. It is a tradeoff that appears to be in the city's best interest, but needs to be closely monitored. After a lot of negotiation to reach a solution with the South Coast Air Quality Management District, officials penned an agreement that will allow the city to increase its production at the Grayson Power Plant.
NEWS
October 1, 2004
Darleene Barrientos After spending some time studying the air quality around Horace Mann Elementary School, Jerome Rizalado, 10, hopes that the adults around him will develop the same convictions he has about pollution. After learning about deforestation and the shrinking of animal habitats, Jerome has adopted a new philosophy. "Now I pick up trash. Before, when I was in a hurry, I sometimes threw it on the floor, but now I pick it up," Jerome declared Thursday.
NEWS
October 12, 2000
Joanne Hedge I wanted to draw attention to the L.A. Times Oct. 5 article "Burbank pollution dogs Lockheed years later" and the accompanying map of the "Plume of pollution," which includes not only my Glendale Rancho neighborhood but the site of the proposed 125-acre multibillion-dollar Disney Imagineering "creative campus" expansion being pushed by that corporation and green lighted at warp speed by the Glendale City...
NEWS
June 29, 2007
Getting to Jury Duty Hassle I've been called for jury duty in downtown Los Angeles. Being retired, I have no problem serving on a jury. But the people who run the jury service seem to have absolutely no common sense. I can ride my bicycle from my home to the Pasadena Court in 15 minutes. No problem. It would save gas, time, traffic congestion and pollution, all the things the environmentalists and L.A. Times tell us we should be doing. So I call the jury people and tell them that and ask for a transfer to Pasadena Court.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
I want to support letter writer Joe Zuazua (“Glendale to become another Bell,” Oct. 25), who doesn't like leaf blowers. An article in The Times a while ago discussed the economics of the gardening business. Gardeners work long hours in a marginal business and they rely on these obnoxious devices to save time. However, the hidden costs are paid by everyone else in the community: excessive noise, toxic, oily exhaust fumes and toxic dust. Compared with four-stroke automobile or lawn-mower engines, their two-stroke engines produce vastly more pollution: About half the gasoline they consume is expelled unburned.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Attempting to relax on a Wednesday morning with the Glendale News-Press, I heard the neighbors' gardeners cranking up their leaf blowers. That high-pitched whine reminded me of the one thing I abhor about Wednesdays. This is the day the gardeners descend upon our neighborhood with their leaf blowers. Then, when I read down through the Forum section of the News-Press, my eye caught the words “leaf blowers” in the title of a letter by Mrs. Ahuda Gorman. A splendid coincidence! I thought only retirees like me understood the pernicious nature of these contraptions.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | August 4, 2009
Much of the debate on the controversial 710 tunnel proposal has been fueled by seemingly competing data, broad claims and public confusion. At issue is whether to move forward with a proposal to connect the 710 Freeway with the 210 Freeway via an underground tunnel. It is a controversial concept, with people committed to both sides despite the fact that reliable information is quite hard to come by on the project. Although no part of the proposed tunnel would be within city limits, opponents claim that it would direct more commuters through the Glendale and foothill regions on the 210 and 134 freeways.
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NEWS
October 31, 2013
I want to support letter writer Joe Zuazua (“Glendale to become another Bell,” Oct. 25), who doesn't like leaf blowers. An article in The Times a while ago discussed the economics of the gardening business. Gardeners work long hours in a marginal business and they rely on these obnoxious devices to save time. However, the hidden costs are paid by everyone else in the community: excessive noise, toxic, oily exhaust fumes and toxic dust. Compared with four-stroke automobile or lawn-mower engines, their two-stroke engines produce vastly more pollution: About half the gasoline they consume is expelled unburned.
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NEWS
August 1, 2013
Attempting to relax on a Wednesday morning with the Glendale News-Press, I heard the neighbors' gardeners cranking up their leaf blowers. That high-pitched whine reminded me of the one thing I abhor about Wednesdays. This is the day the gardeners descend upon our neighborhood with their leaf blowers. Then, when I read down through the Forum section of the News-Press, my eye caught the words “leaf blowers” in the title of a letter by Mrs. Ahuda Gorman. A splendid coincidence! I thought only retirees like me understood the pernicious nature of these contraptions.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | June 20, 2013
Glendale's water quality levels continued to track well within state limits for contaminants in 2012, although a pollutant that was detected for the first time in 2011 reared its head again , according to a recent report mailed out to utility customers. For the second straight year, Methyl Tertiary-butyl Ether - a chemical additive once used in gasoline and better known as MTBE - was found in the Glorietta Wells, according to the annual water quality report. However, even the largest sampling, 0.52 parts per billion, is nowhere near the primary state limit of 13 parts per billion.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court this week heard arguments regarding whether the Los Angeles County Flood Control District bears responsibility for addressing pollutants found in the county's storm water, even when the source of the pollutants has not been identified. On a related issue, many GNP readers have likely received the District's official notice regarding its proposed Clean Water, Clean Beaches Measure, which would assess property owners an annual fee for water quality improvement projects.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
Re: “L.A. City Council spurns 710 tunnel, Aug. 29.” Just do it! Finish the 710 Freeway extension as originally planned more than 40 years ago and forget most of the protest from most of those who were not even around when the project was first started. Many have enjoyed living in the houses that were bought by the California Department of Transportation, including me, many years ago in El Sereno. Has anyone ever mentioned the inconvenience, noise and air pollution that has existed for residents in Alhambra, El Sereno and San Marino for all those years?
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 17, 2012
Glendale's water was well within statelimits for contaminants in 2011, but recent tests turned up a pollutant not detected in 2010, according to the city's water quality report released this week. “Everything's pretty consistent with what we've reported in the past,” said Dan Askenaizer, water quality manager for Glendale Water & Power. “Everything's in compliance.” But in 2011, Methyl Tertiary-butyl Ether, a chemical additive once used in gasoline, was found in north Glendale wells.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | April 12, 2011
A Clark Magnet High School science teacher and five of her students have won the top prize and $70,000 in a national competition for their work in measuring ocean contaminants by testing lobster tissue. The Lexus Eco Challenge — designed to encourage teachers and students to integrate classroom learning with real-world applications — was won by science teacher Dominique Evans-Bye and students Yeprem Chavdarian, Edward Kazaryan, Steve Kechichian, Tania Khanlari and Brian Higgins.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | November 17, 2010
LA CRESCENTA — La Crescenta shoppers will soon have to stick to paper or reusable grocery bags after the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday enacted a sweeping ban on the use of single-use plastic bags. The board voted 3 to 1 Tuesday to approve the ban for unincorporated areas and encouraged the 88 cities across the county to follow suit. Currently, only Malibu has a similar ban in place. Supervisor Mike Antonovich, who represents the La Crescenta area, voted against the ban, which he said would cause additional financial burdens on small retailers and consumers.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | February 5, 2010
The underground tunnel extension of the 710 Freeway, dismissed for years as an unlikely proposal, is moving closer to becoming a reality, stakeholders say. The decades-long controversy surrounding the proposed “gap closure” of the Foothill (210) and Long Beach (710) freeways had been relatively dormant since 2003, when federal officials withdrew their support for the defeated surface highway option. But the debate over the alternative, an underground tunnel, was reinvigorated last year when the California Department of Transportation and Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority released a $6-million route feasibility study.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | August 4, 2009
Much of the debate on the controversial 710 tunnel proposal has been fueled by seemingly competing data, broad claims and public confusion. At issue is whether to move forward with a proposal to connect the 710 Freeway with the 210 Freeway via an underground tunnel. It is a controversial concept, with people committed to both sides despite the fact that reliable information is quite hard to come by on the project. Although no part of the proposed tunnel would be within city limits, opponents claim that it would direct more commuters through the Glendale and foothill regions on the 210 and 134 freeways.
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