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NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | March 8, 2011
The population has fallen slightly in Glendale and risen slightly in Burbank, according to 2010 U.S. Census figures released on Tuesday. Those variations could play an important role in how government funding gets divvied up among cities for years to come, according to city officials. The census, done every 10 years, showed 191,719 residents in Glendale, down 2% from 194,973 in 2000, while Burbank experienced a 3% bump over the same period, from 100,316 to 103,340, according to the data posted through state Department of Finance.
NEWS
May 1, 2010
Regional population grows slightly The population of Glendale and Burbank grew by 0.7% in 2009, modest gains that were in line with many Los Angeles County cities, according to a report from the California Department of Finance released Friday. In Glendale, the population grew from 206,540 to 207,902 in 2009, while in Burbank, the number of residents grew from 107,682 to 108,469, according to the report. La Cañada Flintridge grew 0.6% to 21,261 residents. Los Angeles remained California?
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | November 21, 2012
Black men have the highest rates for prostate cancer in the U.S. About half the minority elder population is poor or near poor. The average duration of unemployment for those age 55 and older in 2007 was 20 weeks. In 2012, that number has risen to more than 50 weeks. Sexual abuse in California's nursing homes is underreported. The total estimated economic value of unpaid family caregivers totals $450 billion. Age can make gender-reassignment surgery nearly impossible. These issues, and the solutions to them, are only a very small percentage of what was discussed at last week's Gerontological Society of America's 65th annual scientific meeting, where a bevy of dedicated researchers, scientists and advocates gathered at the San Diego Convention Center and took on challenges associated with aging.
NEWS
By CARL W. RAGGIO | August 28, 2007
The State Department of Finances projects that California will have a population of 60 million people by 2050. This is a 50-year projection, based on the 2000 population of 34.1 million. We are now at approximately 37 million, 23 million people away from the projection. The state grows at a rate of close to 500,000 people per year. Just think of it — a projection that forecasts a 76% growth in population in 50 years. If we use today’s numbers, 37 million, and extrapolate, it comes to a 62% growth in the next 43 years.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | July 30, 2009
CITY HALL — Ethnic diversity in the city’s workforce has continued to increase in recent years, representing a significant jump in minority representation from 1998 to 2008, according to the city’s most recent workforce demographic report. Last year, whites made up 43.9% of the city’s workforce, compared with 57.5% in 1998, according to the report. Meanwhile, representation of most minority groups has grown, with African Americans seeing their ranks grow by 21% within the 10-year period.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | October 15, 2007
A dark sky on Saturday did not fetter Glendale’s sixth annual Unity Fest at Verdugo Park, nor did dampen the passion behind its purpose. More than a dozen cultures were represented among the festival’s dancers, singers, bands and other artists that not only shared the stage, but their culture. Billed as way to showcase cultural diversity, organizers said they hoped that as Glendale residents bought some Thai food, browsed German glass and watched a traditional Armenian wedding, they would come away with a new insight into the cultural differences among the city’s growing population.
NEWS
October 17, 2003
Robert Chacon William Bodell senses the same type of growth encroaching on La Crescenta that he saw growing up in Orange County. He sees more traffic, school overcrowding and a general increase in the population density. "Our small-town atmosphere is in jeopardy," said the 39-year-old insurance broker. Bodell has been an alternate on the Crescenta Valley Town Council for a year, but wants to upgrade to member so he can have more input and help spare La Crescenta of the brisk growth that defines so much of Southern California.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | August 23, 2008
Am I the only one missing the point about this smoking-ban controversy? It can’t be, but it sure feels like it. The smoking ban itself did not really cause much of a rift in the community, but the recent comments in the Pasadena Weekly attributed to Councilman Dave Weaver did. Weaver allegedly implied that compared with the rest of the population a larger proportion of Armenian-Americans are smokers. If he said this, he was probably correct. As this has not been scientifically proven through a study or a survey, we can consider it somewhat of an anecdotal evidence.
NEWS
September 22, 2006
Letters to the Editor Help Make Crescenta Valley a Better Place to Live Elections for federal and state offices are coming soon, but let's not forget about the local election on Nov. 4 for the Crescenta Valley Town Council. Most will agree that California is such a busy state and our state and national issues often take first place in our minds. Yet, our backyard is important too. We can make Foothill Boulevard look nicer and become an even greater place to work and shop.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 14, 2013
In recognition of the increasing number of Filipinos in Glendale , the City Council this week designated October as Filipino American History Month, an extension of the nationwide celebration first started in 1988. And on Friday afternoon, the Filipino American Business Assn. of Glendale, Soroptimists International of the Verdugos and the city hosted an event at the Central Library featuring Filipino food, traditional dancing and historic artifacts to revel in the honor. “There are a huge number of Filipinos living in Glendale.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 16, 2013
For nine days last month, Anne Reinhard tracked songbirds in Wyoming for a study on the effects of human development on bird populations. Reinhard, who teaches Spanish at Clark Magnet High School and coaches students as they develop their senior projects, worked alongside fellow instructors and scientists to study four species of songbirds in developed, semi-developed and undeveloped areas of Jackson Hole. Reinhard has gone bird watching with the San Fernando Valley Audubon Society but had never participated in scientific research.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 28, 2013
The number of homeless people on Glendale's streets increased 7% from last year to 320, according to the latest figures released this week. The number of transients with mental illnesses and substance abuse issues also ticked up, officials reported, prompting calls for greater focus on detoxification programs, which are missing from the city's coalition of homeless services providers. “Detox is a big gap in our community,” said Glendale's Homeless Services Coordinator Ivet Samvelyan at a meeting with the city's nonprofit service providers Thursday.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | November 21, 2012
Black men have the highest rates for prostate cancer in the U.S. About half the minority elder population is poor or near poor. The average duration of unemployment for those age 55 and older in 2007 was 20 weeks. In 2012, that number has risen to more than 50 weeks. Sexual abuse in California's nursing homes is underreported. The total estimated economic value of unpaid family caregivers totals $450 billion. Age can make gender-reassignment surgery nearly impossible. These issues, and the solutions to them, are only a very small percentage of what was discussed at last week's Gerontological Society of America's 65th annual scientific meeting, where a bevy of dedicated researchers, scientists and advocates gathered at the San Diego Convention Center and took on challenges associated with aging.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 3, 2012
Glendale is graying. From 2000 to 2010, the city's 60-and-older population grew by 16%, according to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The fastest growing age group was 60 to 64, which jumped 36%. At the same time, the youth population dropped 17%, with the 5-to-9 age group sliding 27%. “Glendale represents trends affecting many communities that do not have immigrant and Hispanic populations with higher fertility rates to offset the aging baby boomer cohort,” said Fernando Torres-Gil, director of UCLA's Center for Policy Research on Aging.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 15, 2012
Move over Glendale - Santa Clarita is set to take over the title of third most populous city in Los Angeles County. On Wednesday, a county commission in charge of annexing unincorporated land approved adding seven more communities to Santa Clarita, bringing the city's population of 176,000 to roughly 192,000, in line with Glendale. And by year's end, Santa Clarita is slated to annex more land, boosting its population to just above 200,000, a marker Glendale had claimed for years.
THE818NOW
February 21, 2012
A flock of wild, squawking parrots has decided to nest in Burbank, residents say. At sunrise and sunset, about 100 of them swoop along a path roughly following Verdugo Avenue, creating quite a disturbance. "It's like this noise," said Burbank resident Cindy Brown. "It feels like this roar that just comes overhead. " Though the birds make a lot of noise, experts say they disperse into smaller groups later in the day and at night, when they're fairly quiet. Pockets of the colorful birds can be found throughout Southern California.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
Glendale Adventist Medical Center today will start admitting patients into a new 35,000-square-foot section of the West Tower, a hospital spokeswoman said. The third phase of the tower adds 60 new beds, including two new intensive care units, to the hospital, bringing the total number to 515. That makes Glendale Adventist the largest hospital, in terms of bed count, in the San Fernando Valley, spokeswoman Alicia Gonzalez said in an email. The grand opening was celebrated earlier this month, but the section had to be licensed and certified before accepting patients.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 30, 2011
Faced with a mandated 40% pay cut to get in line with a state cap on compensation for serving on the local redevelopment agency, City Council members on Tuesday said they wanted to partially offset their income loss. The pay cut was triggered after Glendale's population dropped below 200,000, according to figures from the state Department of Finance. Under state law, that drop limits redevelopment compensation for council members to $120 a month. Council members have each been paid $1,400 a month for their work on the agency since 2002 because at the time, the city was above the population threshold.
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