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By Zain Shauk | March 16, 2009
CENTRAL GLENDALE ? With economic turmoil causing jumps in poverty rates, visitors at First Lutheran Church spent part of their Saturday learning about how they could help fight the challenges facing those in need, both locally and worldwide. It was the church?s third annual event designed to create awareness for the problems facing homeless people and those in extreme poverty around the world, said Rachel Ronning-Lindgren, a congregant and one of the event organizers. Visitors from around the Los Angeles area heard from experts about some of the most severe and avoidable effects of poverty and discussed ways to help others.
NEWS
May 21, 2002
Tim Willert GLENDALE -- A growing number of Burbank and Glendale residents are living in poverty, a trend experts say is a reflection of the increasing number of newly arrived immigrants in both cities. One in seven Glendale residents lives below the poverty level, while in Burbank, more than 8% of residents are considered poor, according to new figures from the 2000 Census. In Glendale, 29,927, or 15.5%, of the city's 195,000 residents are considered poor, up from 25,484 reported a decade earlier.
NEWS
September 20, 2004
I've been trying to correlate the Americana at Brand with some statistics I recent read in the News-Press regarding the number of children in the Glendale Unified School District who are classified as poverty cases. As I recall, and I didn't save the article, the lowest percent in poverty, in the various schools, was 32% and the highest was 72%. Based on the numbers I saw, this would place about half of the school-age children, going to school in Glendale, as poverty cases, and by default it would indicate that approximately half of the families living in Glendale are surviving at or below the poverty level.
NEWS
December 5, 2001
An astonishing 46% of the students who attend the Glendale Unified School District are on a reduced-cost or free breakfast and lunch program. What this figure means is that nearly half the students who attend our public schools come from homes that the federal government considers to be of such low income as to qualify them for poverty-level support and a free or reduced cost for breakfast and lunch. The government subsidy for food served to Glendale students amounts to more than $5 million annually.
THE818NOW
By Brian Crosby | July 12, 2011
One of the pleasures of not working during the summer is that it allows me time to read more books.  Some teachers I know like to read books about education, which I do, too.  However, when I’m not working, I prefer to mentally shut it down, so I look for books having nothing to do with school. I just finished Betty Smith’s “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” published in 1943.  I was familiar with the 1945 filmed version of the novel, so I was curious how similar it was to the original source material.
NEWS
July 3, 2001
No one was more surprised than I was when I found myself on a recent Saturday morning, at an hour my family calls "dark-thirty in the morning," leaving for a quick trip to an orphanage in Mexico, a facility more poverty stricken than even the impoverished neighborhoods surrounding it. It may be further proof of my weak character, but since my first trip into Mexico years ago, I've always avoided returning. I can appreciate and even revel in lifestyles different from my own. But confronting desperate poverty so depresses me that I duck having to see it. Rather than being filled with a resolve to help relieve the problem, I'm overwhelmed by its enormity and hopelessness.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
Veterans Day is upon us, that time of year in which we all pause to remember the sacrifices of our armed forces. But this reflection should take place every day, not just Nov. 11. Amid the parades, speeches and ceremonies is a poorly kept - and poorly dealt with - secret: the plight of so many men and women who remain wounded long after the battle is over. The troubles form a long list: homelessness, joblessness, mental illness and inadequate healthcare for physical and psychological injuries.
NEWS
By Vince Lovato | April 21, 2006
They traveled halfway around the world to take a whirlwind tour of China and returned with a greater understanding and appreciation for their own home town. Nineteen Hoover High School music students missed the clean air, the Western toilets, light traffic and suffered through jet lag but they agreed their 12-day visit to Beijing and the Great Wall of China and jamming with Chinese musicians was an experience of a lifetime. "It was a really wonderful cultural and social experience," said Caity Brady, a 16-year-old sophomore who wore a red Chinese dress she bought on the trip to school Thursday.
NEWS
By Dan Kimber | August 14, 2009
My first real job was as a box boy at Ralphs Grocery (the one on Colorado Street and Verdugo Road). I was 16. Sometimes on my lunch breaks I would go up into the upper reaches of the store where our security officer, Gus, was watching the customers through one-way mirrors. Gus was a bit of a philosopher, and I must say that his 9-to-5 view of humanity differed from most people’s. “People do strange things when they think that no one’s watching,” he told me. At my young age, I already knew that to be true, but in my sheltered, abundant life, I did not know, or had not come face to face with, real poverty and destitution.
FEATURES
By By Remo Alexandri | December 17, 2005
As an immigrant myself, I could not refrain from participating in this new round of discussions over the ("illegal") immigration issue, triggered by the day labor center demonstrations a few days ago ("Protesters clash over center," Monday). There is no need to be hysteric at the person-to-person level (the picture on the front page). The illegal immigrants' (and their supporters') strategy to portray themselves as the rightful pursuers of the American dream is what the responsible forces for their miseries on the both sides of the border love these illegal immigrants to say. We should not forget that the so-called illegal immigrants are people like every one of us. They are fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, etc. Most of these illegal immigrants are trapped in an extraordinarily shameful poverty.
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NEWS
November 9, 2012
Veterans Day is upon us, that time of year in which we all pause to remember the sacrifices of our armed forces. But this reflection should take place every day, not just Nov. 11. Amid the parades, speeches and ceremonies is a poorly kept - and poorly dealt with - secret: the plight of so many men and women who remain wounded long after the battle is over. The troubles form a long list: homelessness, joblessness, mental illness and inadequate healthcare for physical and psychological injuries.
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NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | December 5, 2011
The percentage of local school-age children living in poverty is increasing even as programs designed to meet their needs erode amid ongoing federal and state budget cuts. The poverty rate among children ages 5 to 17 living within Burbank Unified boundaries inched upward by 0.9% to 13% in 2010, according data released last week by the U.S. Census Bureau. Meanwhile, the percentage of impoverished children in Glendale Unified increased 1.9% to 18.5%. “It doesn't surprise me at all,” said Rick White, director of social services and volunteer coordinator at the Glendale Salvation Army, which operates a local food bank.
THE818NOW
By Brian Crosby | July 12, 2011
One of the pleasures of not working during the summer is that it allows me time to read more books.  Some teachers I know like to read books about education, which I do, too.  However, when I’m not working, I prefer to mentally shut it down, so I look for books having nothing to do with school. I just finished Betty Smith’s “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” published in 1943.  I was familiar with the 1945 filmed version of the novel, so I was curious how similar it was to the original source material.
NEWS
By Dan Kimber | August 14, 2009
My first real job was as a box boy at Ralphs Grocery (the one on Colorado Street and Verdugo Road). I was 16. Sometimes on my lunch breaks I would go up into the upper reaches of the store where our security officer, Gus, was watching the customers through one-way mirrors. Gus was a bit of a philosopher, and I must say that his 9-to-5 view of humanity differed from most people’s. “People do strange things when they think that no one’s watching,” he told me. At my young age, I already knew that to be true, but in my sheltered, abundant life, I did not know, or had not come face to face with, real poverty and destitution.
FEATURES
By Zain Shauk | March 16, 2009
CENTRAL GLENDALE ? With economic turmoil causing jumps in poverty rates, visitors at First Lutheran Church spent part of their Saturday learning about how they could help fight the challenges facing those in need, both locally and worldwide. It was the church?s third annual event designed to create awareness for the problems facing homeless people and those in extreme poverty around the world, said Rachel Ronning-Lindgren, a congregant and one of the event organizers. Visitors from around the Los Angeles area heard from experts about some of the most severe and avoidable effects of poverty and discussed ways to help others.
FEATURES
By Jeremy Oberstein and Ani Amirkhanian | April 19, 2008
As the sun sets tonight, millions of Jews around the world will engage in the time-honored tradition of Passover, a holiday in which the telling of a 3,000-year-old story sometimes turns into conversations about current events, and where eating a meal is less a means to consumption than a celebration of history. For Rabbi Richard Flom of Burbank’s Temple Emanu El, Passover is an opportunity to address some of the ills that plague developing nations, including poverty and hunger.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | May 3, 2007
GLENDALE — People are getting into the teaching profession, but not enough are staying — including some in Glendale. California is facing a shortage of teachers because too many are leaving the profession prematurely, according to a report released last week by the California State University's Center for Teacher Quality. The exodus is mostly from schools with high poverty levels, according to the report. It states that teachers left their profession citing problems with their working environment — including lack of collegiality, classroom interruptions, unnecessary meetings and too little say over the way schools are run. The shortage of teachers in the state comes as no surprise, said Glendale Teachers Assn.
NEWS
By Vince Lovato | April 21, 2006
They traveled halfway around the world to take a whirlwind tour of China and returned with a greater understanding and appreciation for their own home town. Nineteen Hoover High School music students missed the clean air, the Western toilets, light traffic and suffered through jet lag but they agreed their 12-day visit to Beijing and the Great Wall of China and jamming with Chinese musicians was an experience of a lifetime. "It was a really wonderful cultural and social experience," said Caity Brady, a 16-year-old sophomore who wore a red Chinese dress she bought on the trip to school Thursday.
FEATURES
By By Remo Alexandri | December 17, 2005
As an immigrant myself, I could not refrain from participating in this new round of discussions over the ("illegal") immigration issue, triggered by the day labor center demonstrations a few days ago ("Protesters clash over center," Monday). There is no need to be hysteric at the person-to-person level (the picture on the front page). The illegal immigrants' (and their supporters') strategy to portray themselves as the rightful pursuers of the American dream is what the responsible forces for their miseries on the both sides of the border love these illegal immigrants to say. We should not forget that the so-called illegal immigrants are people like every one of us. They are fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, etc. Most of these illegal immigrants are trapped in an extraordinarily shameful poverty.
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