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NEWS
By Holly Keenan | January 10, 2007
It's time to follow the example of Burbank and La Cañada Flintridge and enact an ordinance that will protect homeowners' views ("View ordinance gets support vote," Tuesday). It's also time to enact a privacy protection ordinance that will protect the privacy of neighbors' backyards from large side windows, balconies and looming second-story floors in new projects. These problems are not limited to hillside areas. They also affect low-density neighborhoods in flatter areas such as northwest Glendale, as I am now learning from first-hand experience.
NEWS
By CHARLES UNGER | January 23, 2009
Does everything in this world need to be litigated? The Supreme Court of the state of California is about to embark on the oh-so-critical decision of whether we sports fans have a right to attend our ball games frisk free. In other words, when I go to see the Lakers play, as I did last Friday night when they took on the Orlando Magic, do I have the right to go to Staples Center to see the game and not have to go through a metal detector first? Is this really worth litigating?
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil | June 10, 2010
Overruling the objections of a neighbor who said the project would invade his privacy, the City Council on Monday upheld the approval of a second-story addition in the 1200 block of Flanders Road. In February, the Planning Commission approved by a 5-0 vote a 1,320-square-foot addition to an existing single-story home at 1225 1/2 Flanders Road, owned by Hui Su and Chengxing Zhai. Philippe Hartley, who owns a nearby home, appealed that decision, arguing that the second story would allow for invasive views into his backyard.
NEWS
March 25, 2005
CHARLES J. UNGER This is a tough one. This is the story of Steven Gates, who used to work at a car dealership in San Diego. His life took a significant turn for the worse when he was involved as an accessory in a 1988 murder-for-hire scheme. His role was a small one, and although he was convicted, he served only a short period of time in jail. This was the wake-up call Gates needed, and he proceeded to totally turn his life around. Gates got married, moved to a very nice neighborhood in San Bernardino and began a business with his wife that became quite successful.
NEWS
December 14, 2007
?This case poses a simple question which harkens back to similar questions raised 50 years ago at the out set of the Cold War, whether the government can impose an onerous background investigation and suitability determination on low risk personnel simply by raising the specter of national security without justifying the need for the investigation or narrowly tailoring its scope.? Thus began oral argument before a three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Federal Court of Appeal on Wednesday, Dec. 5. The remarks were made by Pasadena attorney Virginia Keeny in support of the 28 JPL employees in the case of Nelson vs. NASA.
NEWS
By Bobby McGee | August 11, 2007
Following are my responses to the July 24 City Council meeting, where a great deal of communication centered on the subjects of compatibility, privacy, views, story poles and the Design Review Boards ("Ordinance on views likely to change," July 26). In my opinion, story poles are a poor solution from every perspective. They will be unsightly and long-lasting (as some have mentioned). They will be expensive to put up for property owners. They will not effectively advise observers to the proposed end product.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | June 10, 2011
The Burbank City Council on Tuesday voted not to appeal a Los Angeles County Superior Court decision ordering the release of individual bonus amounts for city employees. The Burbank Leader filed a lawsuit to obtain the information after the city declined to release the records, citing fears about workplace morale and privacy laws. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Ann I. Jones rejected those arguments in her ruling issued in May, saying the public’s right to know the information exceeded any workplace privacy concerns.
NEWS
By Kim Sellars | August 24, 2007
This is my response to the Aug. 11 Community Commentary “Seeking the right designs for Glendale,” by a self-described developer and designer/builder. The writer presents and then debunks a series of straw-man arguments (defined as “a conveniently weak or innocuous . . . issue used as a seeming adversary or argument” by the “New Webster’s Encyclopedic Dictionary”). The claim that story poles are a poor solution, ineffective and will generate lawsuits is just wrong.
NEWS
January 9, 2007
Let's not wage war on our city's deer It is regrettable that a woman was injured by a deer a number of years ago in Chevy Chase Canyon ("Deer overpopulation has bad results," Mailbag, Jan. 4). Regardless of how unfortunate that incident was, let's put it in perspective. One has a far greater chance of being killed, injured or made sick by: an earthquake; fire; getting in a car and driving or riding a mile or two; getting on a train, airplane or bus; walking in downtown Glendale and being mugged; being carjacked; eating uncooked produce or undercooked meat or fowl; spousal abuse; falling down the stairs; or having a kitchen accident.
NEWS
By Dalida Keuroghlian | June 29, 2007
Dearest friends and citizens of Glendale, I don't know the legal definition of extortion in this state, but there is no doubt that I have been victimized by my neighbors, who allege that my family is using our home at 702 E. Glenoaks Blvd. illegally as a business. I have been a good citizen of my city for more than 25 years. The way our neighbors invaded our privacy is not fair to us. If my friend visits me, they think she is a customer and take pictures; if my housekeeper comes and cleans my house, they take pictures.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Stephen Ceasar | September 16, 2013
Hoover High School junior Christopher Chung learned while scrolling through Facebook that his school was monitoring students' online activities . Christopher saw an article posted by a friend about the Glendale Unified School District hiring a company to screen students' social media posts. The school district had been doing so for about a year, the Los Angeles Times reported . "I heard rumors that GUSD was doing a little bit of monitoring - but nothing as official as this," he said.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 27, 2013
Student response to a decision by the Glendale Unified school board to hire a company to monitor students' public posts on social networks has been mixed. The board approved the year-long $40,500 contract with Geo Listening earlier this month to analyze posts on Twitter and elsewhere made by the district's middle and high school students. The company will provide officials with a daily report about how those posts relate to cyber-bullying, substance abuse, truancy, violence or possible suicide attempts.
NEWS
December 14, 2011
Regarding the Glendale News-Press Nov. 19 editorial titled, “The smart move is to choose a new battle,” I ask, why hasn't there been an open and televised debate on the merits of the smart meters? The News-Press editorial dismissed the concern on privacy and security, but only focused on the health issues, equating anti-smart-meter activists with people who claim certain vaccines cause autism in children. “Decades later,” the editorial states, “misinformation continues to be spread; nothing has changed.” What do vaccines and autism have to do with smart meters?
NEWS
By Maria Hsin, maria.hsin@latimes.com | November 27, 2011
As Burbank weighs options for greater oversight of its troubled police department, one thing appears certain: The city will have to walk a fine line when it comes to officer privacy and the public's right to know. The Burbank City Council recently agreed to bring on Michael Gennaco, of the County of Los Angeles Office of Independent Review, to examine certain types of police cases and results of internal investigations. The Police Commission will discuss attorney Robert Corbin's involvement, including whether he should ensure the department's 2011 Strategic Plan is being followed.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | July 5, 2011
CITY HALL — With a growing group of residents asking to opt out of plans to install high-tech smart meters, Glendale Water & Power likely will be forced to offer an alternative to them. Glendale officials have touted the multi-million dollar smart-grid project — which will allow two-way communication with the utility and let customers track real-time water and electricity consumption — as an effective way to encourage conservation and ease the detection of water leaks. But a small group of residents concerned about a loss of privacy, and about the radio waves that the wireless meters emit, is resisting.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | June 10, 2011
The Burbank City Council on Tuesday voted not to appeal a Los Angeles County Superior Court decision ordering the release of individual bonus amounts for city employees. The Burbank Leader filed a lawsuit to obtain the information after the city declined to release the records, citing fears about workplace morale and privacy laws. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Ann I. Jones rejected those arguments in her ruling issued in May, saying the public’s right to know the information exceeded any workplace privacy concerns.
NEWS
November 26, 2010
I too dislike the new, more personally intrusive airport security procedures, but I would dislike it much, much more if a bomb-carrying homicidal maniac slipped through airport security and got aboard a plane that I was flying on. So I am willing to submit to the new disliked procedures, knowing that many others and I will be safer. We have all seen the plethora of media reports about those who vehemently object to the new intrusive procedures. Would those same individuals also object to the intrusiveness of those trying to reassemble their bodies after their plane was blown out of the sky?
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil | June 10, 2010
Overruling the objections of a neighbor who said the project would invade his privacy, the City Council on Monday upheld the approval of a second-story addition in the 1200 block of Flanders Road. In February, the Planning Commission approved by a 5-0 vote a 1,320-square-foot addition to an existing single-story home at 1225 1/2 Flanders Road, owned by Hui Su and Chengxing Zhai. Philippe Hartley, who owns a nearby home, appealed that decision, arguing that the second story would allow for invasive views into his backyard.
FEATURES
February 8, 2010
What is happening to Glendale Water & Power? These smart meters will infringe upon our privacy even more, and as an American citizen, I don’t want to receive a letter telling me that their “new smart meter” that was installed zeroed in on my wash day, and that I could have reduced my wash water intake by washing the whites and darks together in one load! Or that I left two lights on instead of one while on vacation. I certainly don’t live in a socialistic country yet, nor do I want to. If we need to build more dams, then why haven’t we?
NEWS
By CHARLES UNGER | January 23, 2009
Does everything in this world need to be litigated? The Supreme Court of the state of California is about to embark on the oh-so-critical decision of whether we sports fans have a right to attend our ball games frisk free. In other words, when I go to see the Lakers play, as I did last Friday night when they took on the Orlando Magic, do I have the right to go to Staples Center to see the game and not have to go through a metal detector first? Is this really worth litigating?
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