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NEWS
August 10, 2004
Robert Chacon Clifton Hutchins has been in jail for 32 months on suspicion of raping four women in Pasadena and La Crescenta, but soon he hopes he will be a free man. A week before his preliminary hearing, the prosecution was unable to produce one important piece of evidence: the original search warrant used to collect evidence that led to his arrest. Hutchins' attorney has filed a motion to nullify the warrant and to suppress the evidence collected with it, including DNA samples.
NEWS
January 26, 2001
Amber Willard GLENDALE -- Prosecutors have said toxicology tests in the case against a former hospital worker show he killed six patients by giving them fatal injections. But the man's attorney in a handful of civil cases, one of which is expected to be officially dropped today, doubts the legal validity of the tests, as well as plans for criminal prosecution. "The district attorney's prosecution is based upon what we consider to be junk science," Terry Goldberg said of tests to trace the drug Pavulon in 20 suspected victims of Efren Saldivar.
THE818NOW
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | July 12, 2011
The Los Angeles County deputy district attorney who successfully prosecuted Charles Manson and several followers for the 1969 murders of Sharon Tate and six others, is scheduled to appear live Thursday on “The Larry Zarian Show” to discuss his latest book. Vincent Bugliosi — who co-wrote the bestselling book Helter Skelter, which profiled the Manson case and prosecution — will discuss his latest book “Divinity of Doubt: The God Question,” which makes his case for agnosticism.
LOCAL
By Jeremy Oberstein | June 24, 2008
LOS ANGELES — Closing arguments continued for a third day Monday as the prosecution and defense drew one step closer to handing the case over to jurors who will soon be asked to decide the fate of Juan Manuel Alvarez. Alvarez is charged with 11 counts of murder and one count each of felony murder arson and train-wrecking for causing the Jan. 26, 2005, Metrolink train derailment that killed 11 people and left more than 180 injured when he parked his Jeep Cherokee on the tracks in front of an oncoming train.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | September 25, 2007
BURBANK — A Superior Court judge on Monday set a Nov. 7 pretrial hearing date for community leader Stephanie Mines, and prosecutors are expected to present the breadth and scope of their fraud case against her. Appearing in Burbank Superior Court for just a few minutes Monday, Mines quickly left the building with her attorney, George Bird, who said the criminal case against his client for allegedly defrauding a Montrose federal credit union...
NEWS
January 19, 2000
Paul M. Anderson GLENDALE -- The attorney for a Glendale man facing a retrial for extortion has asked a judge to throw out the case if evidence shows the federal government has singled out Armenians for federal prosecution in extortion cases. Attorney Mark Geragos, who is representing Henzel Harutian, argued that case law going all the way up to the U.S. Supreme Court dictates the government's case must be dismissed if there's a pattern of singling out a racial or ethnic group for selective prosecution.
NEWS
April 27, 2001
Tim Willert PASADENA -- The attorney for a La Crescenta teen accused of murder filed a motion Thursday to disqualify the judge who presided over the boy's first trial, which ended in a hung jury. Charles T. Mathews, the attorney for double-murder suspect Michael Demirdjian, filed the motion in Pasadena Superior Court, claiming Judge Joseph De Vanon "is prejudiced against the interests of the defendant." "He made rulings that were consistently biased in favor of the prosecution," Mathews said outside court Thursday, where attorneys on both sides met to set a new trial date.
NEWS
By CHARLES UNGER | May 23, 2008
What were they thinking? The role of a defense attorney is to be an advocate, but the role of a prosecutor is to see that justice is done. Sometimes it doesn?t quite work that way. This is the story of a death penalty overturned because prosecutors handling the case neglected to let the defense know that someone else had confessed to the crime. In the early 1980s, Adam Miranda was accused of robbing and killing a gas station attendant. He was also accused of killing Robert Hosey a couple of weeks before the gas station incident.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
Re "On the right to confront one's accuser in court," by defense attorney Charles J. Unger: Charles J. Unger is really a Pollyanna when it comes to embellishment of defense issues found in court decisions. But don't get me wrong. That's what a truly conscientious and determined defense attorney should do in representing the interests of the accused. But often the best defense of someone accused of a crime or civil wrong can be most accurately determined in truth at the initial investigative scene of either a crime or civil wrong, and at the time all evidence and statements of witnesses are fresh, including the perceptions and so-called incriminating statements of witnesses, and of both the accused and victims, if and when able.
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NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | April 11, 2013
Prosecutors declined to file charges against four Los Angeles men who were arrested this week on suspicion of a "knock-knock" burglary in Chevy Chase Canyon. The Los Angeles County district attorney's office spokeswoman Jane Robison said prosecutors declined to charge the men - Damion Lawson, 21, Alonzo Tolbert, 29, Timothy Bavis, 31, and Antawn Robinson, 32 - due to insufficient evidence. Robinson and Bavis remained in custody without bail due to a parole holds, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.
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NEWS
March 15, 2013
Legislation by Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Silver Lake) to beef up enforcement of penalties for hit-and-run offenses unanimously cleared the Public Safety Committee this week. The bill, which passed on a 7-0 vote, now moves on to the Appropriations Committee, where Gatto is chairman. Assembly Bill 184 extends the statute of limitations on hit-and-run crimes to three years after the crime or one year after a suspect is identified by law enforcement, whichever is later. Under current law, a suspect identified after the three-year statue of limitations expired cannot be prosecuted.
THE818NOW
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | July 12, 2011
The Los Angeles County deputy district attorney who successfully prosecuted Charles Manson and several followers for the 1969 murders of Sharon Tate and six others, is scheduled to appear live Thursday on “The Larry Zarian Show” to discuss his latest book. Vincent Bugliosi — who co-wrote the bestselling book Helter Skelter, which profiled the Manson case and prosecution — will discuss his latest book “Divinity of Doubt: The God Question,” which makes his case for agnosticism.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | April 15, 2009
GLENDALE — Fraudulent medical billing has become increasingly common among health-care providers and businesses contracted with medical facilities, officials said Tuesday. A lawsuit filed by two whistle-blowers, Janine Gostel and Sonia Sarmiento, recently led a Glendale-based physical therapy company, Interstate Rehabilitation LLC, to pay $233,345 to resolve allegations that it fraudulently billed Medicare for services that it did not perform, according to court documents.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | January 10, 2009
PASADENA — A Superior Court judge set a $2-million bail Thursday for Ara Grigoryan, the Glendale man accused of causing the hit-and-run death of Elizabeth Sandoval. Grigoryan was being held without bail, but Judge Dorothy Shubin set bail Thursday saying that although he was a flight risk, he did not meet the other criteria to be held without bail. Shubin set Grigoryan’s bail high because of the seriousness of the crime and because he had fled the country, she said.
LOCAL
By Jeremy Oberstein | June 24, 2008
LOS ANGELES — Closing arguments continued for a third day Monday as the prosecution and defense drew one step closer to handing the case over to jurors who will soon be asked to decide the fate of Juan Manuel Alvarez. Alvarez is charged with 11 counts of murder and one count each of felony murder arson and train-wrecking for causing the Jan. 26, 2005, Metrolink train derailment that killed 11 people and left more than 180 injured when he parked his Jeep Cherokee on the tracks in front of an oncoming train.
LOCAL
By Jeremy Oberstein | May 29, 2008
LOS ANGELES — Prosecutors on Wednesday sought to portray Juan Manuel Alvarez, who testified Tuesday that he did not mean to cause the death of 11 people when he parked his Jeep Grand Cherokee in front of an oncoming Metrolink train in 2005, as a remorseless and violent danger to society. Alvarez is charged with arson and 11 counts of murder with special circumstances for causing the derailment of two Metrolink trains on Jan. 26, 2005, and could face the death penalty if convicted.
NEWS
By CHARLES UNGER | May 23, 2008
What were they thinking? The role of a defense attorney is to be an advocate, but the role of a prosecutor is to see that justice is done. Sometimes it doesn?t quite work that way. This is the story of a death penalty overturned because prosecutors handling the case neglected to let the defense know that someone else had confessed to the crime. In the early 1980s, Adam Miranda was accused of robbing and killing a gas station attendant. He was also accused of killing Robert Hosey a couple of weeks before the gas station incident.
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