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NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | November 29, 2010
CITY HALL — Planning commissioners have endorsed a plan to require public art elements in new developments citywide, but said they were concerned that the artistic quality of buildings could suffer as result. Currently, any new development in the downtown area valued above $500,000 must either incorporate an on-site public art installation equal to 1% of the project's total cost, or pay a 1% in-lieu fee to an urban art fund. Under a proposal considered by the Planning Commission, new developments, renovations or additions valued above $500,000 in mixed-use and commercial zones citywide would have to include a public art installation equal to 2% of the project's cost, or pay a 1% in-lieu fee to support art installations and civic arts programming.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 25, 2014
The Glendale Arts & Culture Commission recently gave a thumbs-up for two separate $60,000 contracts with consultants to continue the city's art-in-vacant-storefront program and a new one focused on temporary public art exhibits on various sites. The commission unanimously recommended last Thursday that John David O'Brien and Arts From the Ashes organize the two programs, respectively. Their recommendations, though, must still go before the City Council for final consideration. The art-in-vacant storefront program, originally called GATE, began roughly three years ago to increase pedestrian interest on streets lined with businesses shuttered by the protracted recession.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Arts events have boosted the popularity and economic prowess of cities like Pasadena and Santa Monica, and Glendale wants a piece of the action. For the first time in more than two decades, Glendale officials have begun mapping out a five-year arts and culture plan in order to shape the city into a regional draw. “When someone says Santa Monica, they automatically think of that city as an arts and culture destination,” said Annette Vartanian, a program supervisor for the Library, Arts & Culture Department.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | December 9, 2010
CITY HALL — Larger developments will soon have to meet expanded requirements for public art, part of the City Council's efforts to create a citywide arts fund. Currently, new projects in the downtown area valued at more than $500,000 must either incorporate an on-site public art installation equal to 1% of the project's total cost, or pay a 1% in-lieu fee to an urban art fund. A proposal, endorsed by the City Council Tuesday, will require new developments, renovations or additions valued above $500,000 in mixed-use and commercial zones citywide to include a public art installation equal to 2% of the project's cost, or pay a 1% in-lieu fee to support art installations and civic arts programming.
NEWS
By | February 20, 2010
CITY HALL ? An interactive light sculpture could be coming to Central Avenue, under the public art proposal for the mixed-use development slated for the street?s intersection with California Avenue. The city?s Arts & Culture Commission voted unanimously to recommend that the City Council approve the art proposal for Legendary Tower Glendale, a proposed complex that includes 71 condominium units and nine ground-floor live-work units. The artwork is mandatory under the Downtown Specific Plan, which requires a public art component valued at 1% of the cost of any project with a price tag of at least $500,000 in the downtown area.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | May 9, 2010
CITY HALL — As city officials continue to delve deeper into the realm of public art programs, Councilman John Drayman has proposed to modify a city policy in hopes of generating funds. Currently, the city’s Downtown Specific Plan requires any new development valued above $500,000 to incorporate an on-site public art installation equal to 1% of the project’s cost or pay a 1% in-lieu fee to an urban art fund. So far, both developments subject to the requirement have opted to include the public art component.
NEWS
May 20, 2003
Several items will be discussed at the city's Arts and Culture Commission meeting Thursday. Winners of the "I Love My Neighborhood" poster contest and Talent Show will be announced, followed by consideration of the Public Art Opportunity project for the Pacific Community Center. Reports will also be given on the arts and economic impact study and the move to Brand Studios, as well as the arts and culture program supervisor's monthly activity report.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | August 30, 2010
CITY HALL — The City Council has endorsed expanding a public art requirement for downtown developers to include all new developments citywide. The city's Downtown Specific Plan currently requires any new development valued above $500,000 to either incorporate an on-site public art installation equal to 1% of the project's total cost, or pay a 1% in-lieu fee to an urban art fund. Under the new proposal, new developments in mixed-use and commercial zones citywide would have to include a public art installation equal to 2% of the project's cost or pay a 1% in-lieu fee to support art installations and civic arts programming.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | September 18, 2009
CITY HALL — A United Nations-sanctioned artist could bring a piece of his work to a downtown street corner under a public art proposal for the Hyatt Hotel slated for the corner of Wilson and Central avenues. The Arts & Culture Commission on Thursday recommended that the City Council approve Newport Beach-based Komar Investments’ estimated $400,000 plan to incorporate artwork by famed artist Yuri “Yuroz” Gevorgian into the design concept and architecture of the proposed 11-story Hyatt Place Glendale.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | September 22, 2006
Glendale residents who took part in community meetings for long-range planning showed the most concern over transportation and mobility, planning and community development and safety and health, according to numbers released by the city. The general meetings took place at eight sites, including the Sparr Heights Community Center, while five more meetings were set up by Leadership Glendale. The local meeting drew a crowd of area residents, and the city kept a record of neighborhoods represented.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2014
For Michael Parker, there would be no better place to carve a 137-foot obelisk into asphalt than a plot of land bounded by the Glendale Narrows of the Los Angeles River, boxy industrial buildings, power lines and the Glendale (2) Freeway. Standing on the massive earthwork - fenced-in on all sides by a 2-foot-deep ditch and piles of infill dirt - visitors are surrounded by a mixture of urban and environmental landscapes, the Los Angeles artist said standing atop his creation this week.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 25, 2014
The Glendale Arts & Culture Commission recently gave a thumbs-up for two separate $60,000 contracts with consultants to continue the city's art-in-vacant-storefront program and a new one focused on temporary public art exhibits on various sites. The commission unanimously recommended last Thursday that John David O'Brien and Arts From the Ashes organize the two programs, respectively. Their recommendations, though, must still go before the City Council for final consideration. The art-in-vacant storefront program, originally called GATE, began roughly three years ago to increase pedestrian interest on streets lined with businesses shuttered by the protracted recession.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | September 20, 2013
A program that brought art to vacant storefronts in downtown Glendale may be expanded to other areas in the city - and it may get a new operator. The program began in 2010 as a way to brighten the empty windows that multiplied as the recession wore on. The Arts & Culture Commission this week recommended that the city advertise for a new consultant to manage the program. Earlier this month, some council members said they would be in favor of opening up the application period to give others a chance to expand the scope of the program.  “It's really to use the success of the last program and build on that,” said Annette Vartanian, a city program supervisor, during a City Hall meeting Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | September 12, 2013
A life-size cutout of Clint Eastwood in cowboy garb won't be the only likeness of a western star to become city property. In a unanimous vote on Tuesday, the City Council approved accepting the donation of five western-inspired art pieces, including the one of Eastwood, from a Los Angeles artist who had originally placed some of the cutouts secretly along the hills above Glendale. “This is the kind of organic art that I really respond to,” said Councilwoman Laura Friedman.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 16, 2013
A city program that collects money from developers to spend on public art may get a small tweak as officials hope to clarify what triggers the fees. On Tuesday, the City Council took the first step to clarify that the urban art fee applies to all new buildings, remodels, repairs, and expansions of $500,000 or more in certain development or mixed-use zones, such as downtown. Currently, the program requires builders to provide artwork on-site worth 2% of the project's value or pay a fee of 1% of the project's value to the city.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
“Is Clint back?” I always ask Jim, my husband, after his hikes in the hills above Descanso Gardens. “Clint” is the life-sized cutout of Clint Eastwood that appeared just off the trail a while back, but it keeps mysteriously disappearing. Bringing the Wild West back to the high chaparral in the San Rafael Hills, Justin, a local artist, has captivated many with his “public art.” Jim met an out-of-town couple last year who had hiked up the steep terrain off the 2 Freeway to get a closer look at the rugged cowboy in a pose from “A Fistful of Dollars.” After he photographed them with their iPhone next to the Spaghetti Western star, Jim pointed them to an easier route down to their car. Jim's last sighting of a new-and-improved Clint was early last week.
NEWS
January 2, 2013
I've never liked New Year's resolutions, though I (sometimes silently) make them every year. I suspect I'm not alone in my loathing and then listing of things I'd like to change about myself and my life. I'm also pretty sure what I want is similar to that of millions of other people. You know, it's the usual “lose weight and be healthy, learn something new like a language, beef up my savings account” tossed in with journalistic aspirations and potential victories, like getting that editor to acknowledge my email on the first try (chances: slim to none)
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Arts events have boosted the popularity and economic prowess of cities like Pasadena and Santa Monica, and Glendale wants a piece of the action. For the first time in more than two decades, Glendale officials have begun mapping out a five-year arts and culture plan in order to shape the city into a regional draw. “When someone says Santa Monica, they automatically think of that city as an arts and culture destination,” said Annette Vartanian, a program supervisor for the Library, Arts & Culture Department.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | June 20, 2012
Pilgrims heading up and down the Glendale (2) Freeway for the last couple of months have noticed a shadowy figure or two gazing into the distance from the hills above. Cardboard cutouts of Clint Eastwood, John Wayne and Gene Autry, bearing labels that read “Glendale Public Art Project 2012,” have been a mystery - something their creator says is intentional. Justin Stadel, the Glassell Park resident and artist behind the cowboy cutouts, said he created the works so viewers could draw a spiritual feeling, a sense of freedom, from L.A.'s varied landscape.
NEWS
April 4, 2011
It amazes me that the police doesn't know what is causing the pedestrian/driver collisions (“Amid car vs. pedestrian crashes police stress safety,” March 25). True, pedestrians need to be aware and be cautious when crossing streets, but pedestrians have been crossing streets in Glendale all along — past and present — and we did not have so many collisions in the past. What is causing car vs. pedestrian crashes are drivers. I live in North Glendale in a quiet suburban area, and each day I encounter drivers who are not stopping at stop signs, are speeding, are on their cell phones and seem to think that they are the only people on the road.
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