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NEWS
By Jason Wells | December 30, 2008
GLENDALE — Healthcare representatives may add asthma to the list of “high profile” public health indicators for Glendale after a report earlier this year found the number of adults suffering from the respiratory affliction had jumped 105% over the last three years. As 12 subcommittees work to finalize their data sets for the forthcoming Quality of Life Indicators report, Bruce Nelson, community services director for Glendale Adventist Medical Center and chairman of the public health committee, said he would like to see asthma placed in the same category as cardiovascular disease and prenatal care when measuring the community’s health.
NEWS
October 24, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- Glendale and other area water systems may have a hard time meeting a public health goal for arsenic that could be as much as 200 times lower than the existing state standard. The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment is expected to announce its public health goal for arsenic in early 2001. David Spath, the drinking water chief for the state Department of Health Services, said he expects a health goal near .25 parts per billion, well below the existing standard of 50 parts per billion.
NEWS
June 26, 2010
Anyone who thought our city didn't need some sort of smoking intervention were proven wrong this week when public health officials released 2007 figures that put us near the high-end of reported tobacco use. In 2007, the adult smoking rate was in the 15% to 16% range, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. It was the last survey before city officials started implementing broad anti-smoking measures meant to limit the public's exposure to second-hand smoke.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Public health officials today warned that the air quality in the Santa Clarita and east San Gabriel valleys is unhealthy, and those with respiratory ailments should limit outdoor activity. The warning from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health comes as a heat wave takes hold in the Southland. Temperatures, particularly Tuesday and Wednesday, are expected to hit triple degrees in some parts of the valley. Burbank and Pasadena are expected to remain in the 90-degree range throughout the week The air quality warning applies to people with heart disease, asthma or other chronic respiratory diseases.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
A smoldering heat wave today could push the temperatures to 106 degrees in Burbank and Glendale, prompting warnings from public health officials to limit outdoor activities. In a statement, Dr. Jonathan Fielding, Los Angeles County's public health director, reminded the public that the extreme heat may worsen the effects of poor air quality, warnings for which were issued Monday for parts of the Santa Clarita and east San Gabriel valleys. “While people don't need to be told it's hot outside, they do need to be reminded to take care of themselves, children, the elderly and pets when the weather gets hotter,” Fielding said.
NEWS
March 1, 2003
Tim Willert A toxicologist who resigned under protest from a blue-ribbon panel charged with determining the dangers of chromium 6 in drinking water testified Friday that the panel's report should not be used as a basis for establishing public-health standards. Joseph Froines, a professor of toxicology for the UCLA School of Public Health, and the first scientist named to the panel, told a hearing of the Senate Health and Human Services Committee that the state-sponsored study was too limited in its scope and depth and didn't acknowledge the uncertainties of its research.
NEWS
March 28, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- In a move almost certain to affect Glendale's efforts to deal with chromium 6 contamination, Gov. Gray Davis on Tuesday ordered the Department of Health Services to begin working on a public health standard for the chemical. The order will create a definitive standard for a substance whose health risk is frustratingly unclear. The state only has a health standard for total chromium, a situation that has left cities like Glendale trying to make policy decisions about drinking water with only a general idea of what risk they may be facing.
NEWS
January 9, 2002
Re: Glendale Rose Float: I read the letter this morning from Steve Mead of Montrose regarding the Glendale entry in the Rose Parade this year. What is his problem? Bob's Big Boy is part of Glendale history, and Americana. If you continue to use his reasoning, the whole parade is damaging to the environment and the public health. (How dare we cut living plants to decorate fossil-fuel burning vehicles?) Come on, Steve, stop being such a killjoy and let everyone else enjoy themselves.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
Vaccination awareness month The Centers for Disease Control and Los Angeles Department of Public Health are urging the public to get flu shots this week during National Influenza Vaccination Month. Though many people associate ?flu season? with the fall months, January marks the peak flu period, public health officials said. Vaccination is available in traditional shot form, as well as a nasal spray, which is available for healthy children and adults between the ages of 2 and 49. In Glendale, vaccinations can be obtained at health clinics in CVS pharmacies.
NEWS
October 24, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- The state standard for chromium in drinking water should be lowered, but the public should not be concerned about drinking ground water from the San Fernando Basin aquifer before any reduction happens, according to a health expert that will testify today at a public hearing in Burbank. Joseph Landolph, an associate professor at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, called for a federal scientific study to determine appropriate levels of chromium in water.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 15, 2014
After receiving 18,000 comments, the California Department of Public Health on Tuesday recommended setting the maximum limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, bringing the new cap on the pollutant that has plagued Glendale water for decades one step closer to finalization. The recommendation is expected to be approved within 30 days by an administrative arm of the state government, known as the Office of Administrative Law, according to a statement released by the public health department.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 10, 2013
Councilman Ara Najarian tried to put the brakes on funding Tuesday for research into a water contaminant impacting Glendale groundwater, but the majority of the council voted to approve spending another roughly $600,000 on a project that has cost more than $9 million over more than a decade. Najarian said he voted against the funding because he felt the two types of removal methods analyzed thus far have been ineffective . Najarian was also upset that city officials rebuffed a new filtration method invented by a professor from Yerevan University in Armenia, whom he introduced to city staff.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | September 16, 2013
The biggest health issue facing the Glendale community is obesity and several conditions related to it, according to a local report released this week. More than a third of Glendale's residents were overweight in 2011 and 21% were found to be obese, according to the “Community Health Needs Assessment” report. The list of top health issues also included conditions for which obesity is a risk factor, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and high cholesterol.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 9, 2013
This article has been amended, see note below for details. After spending more than 10 years and roughly $9 million, engineers testing two high-tech methods for removing chromium 6 from groundwater say neither method can reliably bring levels of the cancer-causing contaminant down to the point where it would hit a state public health goal. In 2011, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment set a goal of drastically reducing the amount of chromium 6 - the contaminant brought to notoriety by the 2000 film “Erin Brokovich” - in the water supply.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | February 6, 2013
It should come as no surprise that Los Angeles has made the list of top 10 cities for worst traffic congestion in the country, according to a newly released report from the Texas Transportation Institute. It might seem surprising however, that we've come in second instead of first. That honor goes to Washington D.C. On average, Los Angeles drivers spent 61 hours stuck in traffic in 2011, costing them $1,300 in time and fuel. That's just six less than D.C. drivers. At the moment, I have the luxury of not having a commute, of being able to plan my drive across L.A. based on off-peak hours, but I have paid my dues on our jammed roads.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 2, 2012
After more than a decade and nearly $9 million, Glendale is nearing the end of its research into the water contaminant chromium 6. After the City Council this week approved using $536,000 to put the final touches on the research project, officials said it would be the last time they would be dealing with the money side of what has morphed into a national research effort for the most effective - and financially prudent - method for stripping the...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 13, 2012
For the first time, a Glendale research team testing methods for stripping chromium 6 from groundwater has released an estimate for how much it will cost long term - putting the tab at up to $27 million over 20 years. The costs will be a key consideration for the California Department of Public Health, which plans to use the more than 10 years of research carried out by Glendale Water & Power to set a new maximum contaminant level for cancer-causing hexavalent chromium. In doing so, state officials must consider the costs and technical feasibility.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
A smoldering heat wave today could push the temperatures to 106 degrees in Burbank and Glendale, prompting warnings from public health officials to limit outdoor activities. In a statement, Dr. Jonathan Fielding, Los Angeles County's public health director, reminded the public that the extreme heat may worsen the effects of poor air quality, warnings for which were issued Monday for parts of the Santa Clarita and east San Gabriel valleys. “While people don't need to be told it's hot outside, they do need to be reminded to take care of themselves, children, the elderly and pets when the weather gets hotter,” Fielding said.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Public health officials today warned that the air quality in the Santa Clarita and east San Gabriel valleys is unhealthy, and those with respiratory ailments should limit outdoor activity. The warning from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health comes as a heat wave takes hold in the Southland. Temperatures, particularly Tuesday and Wednesday, are expected to hit triple degrees in some parts of the valley. Burbank and Pasadena are expected to remain in the 90-degree range throughout the week The air quality warning applies to people with heart disease, asthma or other chronic respiratory diseases.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
With temperatures expected soar into the 90s this week, two cooling centers have opened in Glendale to provide seniors a place to stay out of the heat. The Adult Recreation Center, 201 E. Colorado St., will operate its cooling center 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Thursday; and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The cooling center at Sparr Heights Community Center, 1613 Glencoe Way, will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday.
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