Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsPunctuation
IN THE NEWS

Punctuation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 12, 2012
Some people worry that high-tech communications are bringing down language standards. In a Twitter-centric world where people write “some1” in place of “someone,” these fears seem valid. But linguists beg to differ. Language, their work has demonstrated again and again, polices itself according a simple law: the need to be understood. But another way of looking at these issues hit me recently while I was reading a real estate-related website: In an age when everyone's a “published writer,” spelling, punctuation and grammar may be more important than ever.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 14, 2014
A group of university researchers working with some Facebook folks have recently determined that I'm not a dinosaur. Not yet, at least. Copy editors like me, who for years have been watching our hard-earned grammar skills get discounted with every poorly constructed Facebook post and semiliterate celebrity tweet, could still be useful one, two, possibly three years from now. All those awful grammar errors you see online every day may not be rendering...
NEWS
By June Casagrande | October 6, 2012
We had a good thing going for a while, but it could soon be toast. By “we,” I mean readers, writers and editors. By “a good thing,” I mean a system for placing periods and commas relative to quotation marks. And by “toast,” I mean falling victim to that annihilator of printed word traditions: the Internet. For decades, American publishing has had some very specific rules on how to handle punctuation that comes next to a closing quotation mark. And if, as a reader, you never noticed how it was done - well, that was the point: a visually unobtrusive system that creates no stumbling blocks to sentence flow or ease of reading.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | November 25, 2011
I have a confession to make. You know those cheesy online articles that use questionable tactics to suck you in? Well, they suck me in. I see a headline like “10 Things in Your Kitchen that Are Killing You” or “Five Ways to Retire Now with a Yacht and a Mansion” and chances are I'm clicking the link. I “read” those picture-gallery articles that try to convey complex principles of biochemistry through high-resolution images of blueberries and pretty women sipping green tea. I should know better.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | September 5, 2007
I’ve been taking the train lately. It’s just three quarters of a mile from my house and arrives just a half mile from my destination. My route requires me to buy just four passes a day for a total of $5 — only 40% more than the gallon of gas I would otherwise use — and it gets me to my destination just 15 minutes later than I could get there by car. For all these reasons and more, I can’t imagine why I would hop in my air-conditioned, practically new car and miss out on all the foot-blistering, deodorant-testing, please-don’t-talk-to-me-you-smell-like-Lindsay-Lohan-on-Sunday-morning fun. (Note to self: sue Al Gore for mental damages.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | May 21, 2008
I fear change. I’m not proud of it, but it’s who I am. Low-waisted jeans come into fashion and I worry I don’t have the abs to wear them with most tops. Low-waisted jeans go out of fashion and I worry I don’t have the waistline to go back to the midriff-cinching styles. A friend gets a new boyfriend and I worry she won’t have as much time for me. She dumps him and I worry she’ll get too clingy. Married friends announce they’re having kids and I worry whether the local landfill can handle more diapers.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | November 23, 2005
Hello and welcome to "Did June Know That?" the game I just made up where everyone gets to feel smarter than me. Here's how we play: I open up a language book to a random page, close my eyes and point. If it's something I didn't know, you get to gloat silently over your morning coffee. If it's something I knew already, you have to send me money. OK? Great. Let's play. The book we'll be using today (and probably every time in the future) is "Garner's Modern American Usage." It's a wonderful book I recommend to everyone and I wish I had written.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | December 13, 2006
I'm not currently in therapy, but if I were, I think one session might go a little something like this. Me: "All the grammar Nazis are driving me nuts. I can't take it anymore." Therapist: "What grammar Nazis?" Me: "The ones I keep finding on the Internet." Therapist: "How do you keep finding them?" Me: "Well, I'm searching for them. I'm googling terms like 'grammar' and 'peeve' and 'makes me grate my teeth' and 'stick an ice pick in my ear.'" Therapist: "Why would you do that?"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 14, 2014
A group of university researchers working with some Facebook folks have recently determined that I'm not a dinosaur. Not yet, at least. Copy editors like me, who for years have been watching our hard-earned grammar skills get discounted with every poorly constructed Facebook post and semiliterate celebrity tweet, could still be useful one, two, possibly three years from now. All those awful grammar errors you see online every day may not be rendering...
Advertisement
NEWS
By June Casagrande | November 9, 2012
Whenever I hear people talk about the conniving, scheming nature of the media, it just makes me laugh. I spent enough time working at news organizations to know the closest thing true journalists have to an agenda is the desperate desire to meet brutal deadlines in understaffed newsrooms while figuring out how they'll pay their rent once talking heads and TMZ finally run real news-gathering organizations out of business. Manipulating the masses doesn't exactly figure prominently on the average reporter's list of priorities.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | October 6, 2012
We had a good thing going for a while, but it could soon be toast. By “we,” I mean readers, writers and editors. By “a good thing,” I mean a system for placing periods and commas relative to quotation marks. And by “toast,” I mean falling victim to that annihilator of printed word traditions: the Internet. For decades, American publishing has had some very specific rules on how to handle punctuation that comes next to a closing quotation mark. And if, as a reader, you never noticed how it was done - well, that was the point: a visually unobtrusive system that creates no stumbling blocks to sentence flow or ease of reading.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 12, 2012
Some people worry that high-tech communications are bringing down language standards. In a Twitter-centric world where people write “some1” in place of “someone,” these fears seem valid. But linguists beg to differ. Language, their work has demonstrated again and again, polices itself according a simple law: the need to be understood. But another way of looking at these issues hit me recently while I was reading a real estate-related website: In an age when everyone's a “published writer,” spelling, punctuation and grammar may be more important than ever.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | November 25, 2011
I have a confession to make. You know those cheesy online articles that use questionable tactics to suck you in? Well, they suck me in. I see a headline like “10 Things in Your Kitchen that Are Killing You” or “Five Ways to Retire Now with a Yacht and a Mansion” and chances are I'm clicking the link. I “read” those picture-gallery articles that try to convey complex principles of biochemistry through high-resolution images of blueberries and pretty women sipping green tea. I should know better.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | September 23, 2011
Someday soon, your local drugstore will spend the first part of September decking the aisles with dangling apostrophes and setting out display cases of semicolon-themed bric-a-brac. But until the day marketers sniff out the profit potential of another holiday, it's up to word nerds like me to help spread the word about National Punctuation Day. On Sept. 24, National Punctuation Day is the brainchild of Jeff Rubin, a professional wordsmith based in Pinole, Calif. With a strong emphasis on schools and kids, National Punctuation Day promotes games, activities, contests and lessons in classrooms nationwide and is now entering its eighth year.
NEWS
March 18, 2011
Once you’ve seen “embarrass,” and “supersede” and “its” in print a million times, there’s a chance that the next time you write one of these words, you’ll get it right without thinking about it — a better chance than for people who don’t read as much, anyway. That’s why an SAT test prep company I worked for years ago had us tell students in our vocabulary course: read, read, read. But every once in a while, I come across a spelling or punctuation issue so odd that no amount of innate word smarts can save you. This came to my attention recently when a very word-savvy friend, author Carolyn Howard-Johnson, asked me how to write “conscience’ sake.” “Seems like something you’d remember if you’d ever looked it up,” she wrote.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | August 19, 2009
At last count, 9.4% of America?s workers were out of work. That means that, in recent months, at least 9.3% of America?s workers have encountered the phrase, ?Excellent verbal and written communications skills required.? For people who had access to enough caffeine before high-school English class, that?s not a problem. But for others, this is bad news. You can?t go back to high school any more than you can call your old English teacher and say, ?Hey, you know all that stuff you were talking about in 1988?
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|