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NEWS
By KATHERINE YAMADA | July 17, 2009
A flower-covered statue of Peter Pan, the boy from Never-Never Land who never grew up, was the feature of Glendale?s 1954 entry in the Tournament of Roses, but the focus was on two riders, Mary Dibble and Barbara Beaven. Dibble, the 1953 Days of Verdugo queen, and Beaven, one of that year?s princesses, were selected to portray two mermaids from Never-Never Land?s lagoon. Designer C. Lewis Stanley positioned Peter Pan on a giant mushroom, his arms stretched out to protect his three friends, John, Michael and Wendy Darling.
NEWS
February 13, 2004
Several Glendale Memorial Hospital patients and staff members got down and danced Thursday in honor of the hospital's appointed royalty -- five patients crowned king and queen of hearts and "Young at Heart" in commemoration of National Heart Month. Eugenia Bedrossian, of Glendale, and Don Chubbuck, of South Pasadena, were crowned senior queen and king. Crowned junior queen and king were Esther Ancurio, of Hollywood, and Chuck Schepart, of La Crescenta. Tom McGill, of Glendale, was appointed the Heart Center's Young at Heart.
NEWS
June 5, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman GLENDALE -- Now that transcripts from the Efren Saldivar mass murder case are public record, state Respiratory Care Board officials are trying to take punitive actions against four hospital employees who worked with him. Officials at Glendale Adventist Medical Center say it's about time. Saldivar was sentenced to life in prison without parole for killing six patients while working at Glendale Adventist. Some of his co-workers testified they knew he was doing it. "We are very disappointed that the respiratory board did not take action much sooner, with so much information out there and this being four years after Efren's initial confession," hospital spokesman Mark Newmyer said.
NEWS
February 13, 2006
briefsLeague schedules SAT seminars Scholastic Assessment Test Seminars, sponsored and partially underwritten by Assistance League of Glendale, are being offered from Feb 27 to March 23 at the Chapter House of the Assistance League, 314 E. Harvard St. Classes are from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays and Tuesdays and Thursdays. The book being used is "Sat Success" by Kaplan. There are eight classes, four math and four English. Refreshments will be served. Practice tests will be given, and enrollment is limited to 35 students per class.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Klemzak | October 20, 2007
Presented as a sequel to the 1998 film ?Elizabeth,? ?Elizabeth: The Golden Age? is reminiscent of historical dramas that were staples for years, going back to the early days of Hollywood. This latest offering from director Shekhar Kapur delivered the goods pretty much as I expected; that is, opulent costumes, exaggerated hairstyles, corny, stilted dialogue, rugged battle scenes, and at least one reasonably steamy romance. And although this film is not quite as good as its predecessor, I loved every minute of it. Cate Blanchett, in her reprised role as Elizabeth, reaffirmed my belief that she is the finest film actress of her generation.
NEWS
By Rachel Kane | November 18, 2006
The cafeteria of Glendale High School was turned into a royal court on Tuesday night as seniors from two English literature classes participated in their Medieval Banquet. The seniors masqueraded in costume and character as medieval kings, queens, entertainers and townspeople from two fictional clans called Staffordshire and Keastdom. The Medieval Banquet was part pay-off and part learning experience for the students' curriculum on medieval times. The menu, music and entertainment of the evening all followed closely the time period.
NEWS
February 14, 2002
Not all of a city's treasures are in museums or in the parlor display cases of wealthy art collectors. Glendale's jewels include many glittering citizens whose dedication to the city extends north, south, east and west of Colorado and Brand. Two of Glendale's treasures were lost to us just two days apart last week). The late Mary Hamilton and the late H.M. Wammack surely were well acquainted; they must have bumped into each other hundreds of times in their journeys through the community's maze of dedicated paths.
LOCAL
By Jane Lee, Youth Correspondent | October 22, 2004
When students come to school dressed in '80s clothing and have a mouthful of pie and whipped cream on their face, it can only mean one thing: homecoming week. For Crescenta Valley High School students, homecoming is more than a football game or a dance. "It means being able to see students eat gross food as fast as they can, getting to have shorter classes on Friday and having an excuse to come home late on Saturday night," said senior Jane Kim. Homecoming festivities began the week before the homecoming game as Spirit Week encouraged students to show their school spirit.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | May 23, 2013
Robert Newcombe, author of the recently published "Images of America, Montrose," spent countless hours searching through microfilm trying to verify information that has been handed down to local historians for years. His goal was twofold: first, did developers Holmes and Walton hold a contest to name their new community? Second, why was the name Montrose selected? Was it named after Montrose, Pa., a small town in the winner's home state, or because it appealed to all the rose fanciers in the area, or because of the popularity of Sir Walter Scott's "The Legend of Montrose?"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 29, 2014
After Phiona Mutesi lost her father to AIDS when she was 3 years old, she grew accustomed to always feeling hungry and searching for food in one of the world's worst slums. When she was 9 years old, she followed her brother to where she had heard porridge was promised to her and other children in the Katwe slum of Uganda. When she arrived, she saw the other children playing chess in a program established by Sports Outreach Institute, a Christian ministry that offers sports programs in areas around the world affected by war or poverty.
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NEWS
December 17, 2013
As I watched the Glendale City Council Meeting on cable Dec. 10, I was shocked and embarrassed by the way Mayor Dave Weaver treated a citizen who was giving input on an agenda item. The citizen was critical of the city's irresponsible spending and gave a few factual examples. Mayor Weaver interrupted the citizen several times and then said something to the effect of, “If you don't like the way we run the city, why don't you move out?” The mayor cut the citizen off and made it very clear that the issue was not open for discussion, but let Councilman Quintero and City Manager Ochoa discuss it, and make comments about how misinformed the citizen was - note, that's misinformed in their opinion.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | May 23, 2013
Robert Newcombe, author of the recently published "Images of America, Montrose," spent countless hours searching through microfilm trying to verify information that has been handed down to local historians for years. His goal was twofold: first, did developers Holmes and Walton hold a contest to name their new community? Second, why was the name Montrose selected? Was it named after Montrose, Pa., a small town in the winner's home state, or because it appealed to all the rose fanciers in the area, or because of the popularity of Sir Walter Scott's "The Legend of Montrose?"
NEWS
By June Casagrande | November 23, 2012
You know how grammar buffs can be a little, well, difficult to be around? Judgmental? Quick to correct? And you know how even when they're being quiet you can almost hear the unspoken criticisms seeping through their pores? Well, this grammar buff is about to take that dynamic to new heights, making the leap from simply abrasive to utterly insufferable. That's because I, an already-devout smarty-pants, recently outsmarted one of the most authoritative sources in language: I found a mistake - or at the very least some fuzzy thinking - in the Associated Press Stylebook.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 27, 2011
Members of the Tournament of Roses' Royal Court donned their jeweled crowns for the first time in an elegant ceremony Thursday at the Pasadena Convention Center. News anchor and Pasadena resident Colleen Williams of KNBC-TV emceed the event, which began with each of the six Rose Princesses appearing on the arm of a U.S. Marine escort. The six Marines all had served in either Iraq or Afghanistan and received a long standing ovation for their service. On their arms were Rose Court princesses Sarah Zuno, 17, of Highland Park; Hanan Worku, 17, of Pasadena; Morgan Devaud, 18, of La Cañada Flintridge; Kimberly Ostiller, 17, of Altadena; Cynthia Louie, 17, of La Cañada and Stephanie Hynes, 18, of Pasadena.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
There may be seven princesses, but there can only be one queen. The 94th Rose Queen is scheduled to be announced at a ceremony in Pasadena later today, capping a period of tense anticipation for seven young women since they were named to the Royal Court last week. The Rose Queen will be the lead figure head for the Tournament of Roses Assn., an emissary who, with her Royal Court, will be sent to more than 100 appearances on behalf of the organization. She will also be featured in the 123rd Rose Parade on Jan. 2, with millions of people watching on live television.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 18, 2011
Before announcing the 2012 Rose Queen on Tuesday morning, Tournament of Roses Assn. President Rick Jackson congratulated the seven princesses of the Royal Court for making it so far, but, he said, “there can only be one queen.” Drew Washington, a 16-year-old captain of the varsity volleyball and track-and-field teams at Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy, secured the crown after her name was called, prompting a flurry of screams and cheers from...
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | February 15, 2011
Glendale Community College professor John Queen — a key advocate for faculty members during the tumultuous leadership of former President/Supt. Audre Levy — has won the statewide Full-Time Faculty of the Year Award. "John Queen has proven himself a dedicated leader on faculty and student issues," said Patrick Harbison, communications director for Faculty Assn. of California Community Colleges. The 10,000-member association and lobbying group advocates on behalf of community college faculty members.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nicole Charky | December 1, 2010
"The Nutcracker" is often the usual Christmas classic, but locals know another story: "The Snow Queen. " California Contemporary Ballet will perform Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale of good prevailing over evil Dec. 17 to 19. The story tells of two best friends, Gerta and Kai, and Gerta's path to reach Kai after the Snow Queen places him under an evil spell. "The Snow Queen" features a cast of 60 performers in a mix of classical ballet and contemporary dance. Dancers also take flight through aerial ballet.
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