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NEWS
October 24, 2012
A judge has rejected an effort by Bell's former police chief to more than double his pension to $510,000 a year, saying that the City Council never approved his extravagant contract and that city officials tried to keep his salary secret. Randy Adams, who was fired as the city was engulfed in scandal, would have become one of the highest paid public pensioners in California had his request been approved. The cost of doubling Adams' pension would have fallen primarily on Ventura, Simi Valley and Glendale, where he spent most of his career.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
The police chief who was ousted after it was revealed that he and other city leaders in Bell were drawing enormous salaries has sued his former employers for severance pay. Randy Adams effectively stopped working for the city shortly after The Times revealed the high salaries paid to the former chief, as well as Chief Administrative Officer Robert Rizzo and Angela Spaccia, Rizzo's assistant. Adams was paid $457,000 annually, one of the highest law enforcement salaries in the nation and nearly 50% more than Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck is paid.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Already one of California's highest paid public pensioners, former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams this week asked a state pension panel to double his retirement pay to reflect the huge salary he received during his brief stint as the top cop in the scandal-plagued city. If Adams wins his case, which is being heard in Orange County, his pension would zoom to $510,000 a year, making him the second-highest-paid public pensioner in California. On the witness stand Thursday, Adams invoked his 5th Amendment right to not incriminate himself 20 times, including when asked about his Bell salary, which was among the highest law enforcement paychecks in the nation.
NEWS
The Los Angeles Times | August 11, 2011
Former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams will continue receiving generous retirement benefits even after CalPERS slashed the amount by more than $100,000. Adams, whose $457,000 salary was higher than Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck's and more than double his salary when he was Glendale's chief, will receive a pension of $287,066, according to documents obtained by The Times under the California Public Records Act. That's down considerably from the $411,300 he was expecting to receive.
NEWS
January 10, 2012
Many of the former leaders of the city of Bell were back in court Tuesday, demanding that the corruption charges against them be dropped or dismissed. They are also asking why the former police chief of the city, Randy Adams, is not facing charges as well. Former City Manager Robert Rizzo -- who has been described as the mastermind of the plan to loot small city -- was among those in court Tuesday. Continue reading > > RELATED: Judge questions why Bell's former police chief isn't facing corruption charges Six former Bell council members lose appeal -- KTLA-TV Photo: Former Bell Mayor Oscar Hernandez, left, with former councilmembers George Mirabal, Victor Bello, and Teresa Jacobo in court last year.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
Former Bell Police Chief Randy G. Adams is requesting that a judge order Bell to pay legal expenses he incurred while defending himself in a civil lawsuit and corruption investigations. Attorneys for the former chief filed a complaint against the city earlier this week in Los Angeles County Superior Court after Bell repeatedly refused to pay his expenses. "The city would not talk to us, so we're forced to take this action," said Adams' attorney, Thomas P. O'Brien. He said Adams, who was police chief in Glendale before going to Bell, is trying to recoup hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal expenses.
NEWS
November 4, 2011
The number of former public employees making more than $100,000 a year in retirement from California's largest public pension system has jumped 99% in the last two years. The Orange County Register calculated that there are 12,199 retirees in the state who are firmly in the $100K club, those earning six-figure pensions through the California Public Employees Retirement system. That's up from 6,133 six-figure retirees in 1999. At the top of the chart is Bruce V. Malkenhorst, the retired city administrator of Vernon who since his retirement has been heads and shoulders above other well-compensated retirees.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Former Glendale Police Chief Randy Adams testified Friday during a police lieutenant's discrimination lawsuit that he was responsible for diversifying the department and had to discipline two officers, which he didn't fire, for derogatory actions against Armenian-Americans. Adams said he suspended one of the officers, who created a bogus 2008 internal memo with a doctored image of a patrol car covered in Armenian flags, for 100 hours without pay. The second officer was suspended for 300 hours for allegedly calling Armenian-Americans “parasites” and “frauds” on a YouTube blog.
LOCAL
By Robert S. Hong | January 18, 2007
CITY HALL — Nearly 30 Los Angeles County police chiefs packed Glendale's City Council Chambers Tuesday to salute the efforts of Glendale Police Chief Randy Adams as he stepped down as president of the Los Angeles County Police Chiefs' Assn. The association — which meets on a monthly basis to discuss chiefs' concerns, strategies for combating crime and other law enforcement business — presented Adams with a plaque recognizing his service. He also received recognition from the Governor's office.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | December 13, 2013
Before retiring Police Chief Ron De Pompa accepted a collegiate science scholarship 36 years ago, he made the fateful decision of agreeing to go on a police ride-along with a Glendale police officer. That night wasn't a typical ride-along; rather; it was filled with excitement as he witnessed a police pursuit. “I was hooked from then on,” he said. “This is what I wanted to do.” De Pompa eventually became a Glendale officer and rose through the ranks of his hometown police department.
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NEWS
November 22, 2013
Former Glendale Police Chief Randy Adams testified Friday during a police lieutenant's discrimination lawsuit that he was responsible for diversifying the department and had to discipline two officers, which he didn't fire, for derogatory actions against Armenian-Americans. Adams said he suspended one of the officers, who created a bogus 2008 internal memo with a doctored image of a patrol car covered in Armenian flags, for 100 hours without pay. The second officer was suspended for 300 hours for allegedly calling Armenian-Americans “parasites” and “frauds” on a YouTube blog.
NEWS
By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives | November 6, 2013
After years of silence , the former police chief of Bell took the witness stand Wednesday and testified that he was initially “suspicious” about taking the job in the working-class town because of the long legacy of corruption in southeast Los Angeles County. Randy Adams, who was one of the highest-paid law enforcement officials in the nation when he was forced from his job, said he was stunned by the salary the city offered to pay him, the Los Angeles Times reported. “I was surprised that a little city like this could afford to hire me” Adams testified.
NEWS
By Jeff Gottlieb | November 5, 2013
Bell's former police chief -- once among the highest-paid law enforcement officials in the nation -- agreed Tuesday to testify in an ongoing corruption case against one of his former bosses. DOCUMENT: DEPOSITION OF RANDY ADAMS The testimony would break years of silence by Randy Adams, who was forced from his job when the town was engulfed in a salary scandal in 2010. Though he was named in a civil case alleging massive corruption in the small city, he was never criminally charged, the Los Angeles Times reported . Adams is a former chief of the Glendale Police Department.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
Randy Adams, the disgraced former police chief of several cities, including Glendale, got exactly what he deserved this week: rejection. A judge denied Adams' request to double his pension to $510,000 a year based on his yearlong stint as police chief of the tiny city of Bell, where he was fired amid an executive pay scandal and criminal investigation. Adams would have become one of the highest-paid public pensioners in California had his request been approved, but the judge said the Bell City Council never approved his extravagant contract and that city officials tried to keep his salary secret.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
A judge has rejected an effort by Bell's former police chief to more than double his pension to $510,000 a year, saying that the City Council never approved his extravagant contract and that city officials tried to keep his salary secret. Randy Adams, who was fired as the city was engulfed in scandal, would have become one of the highest paid public pensioners in California had his request been approved. The cost of doubling Adams' pension would have fallen primarily on Ventura, Simi Valley and Glendale, where he spent most of his career.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Already one of California's highest paid public pensioners, former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams this week asked a state pension panel to double his retirement pay to reflect the huge salary he received during his brief stint as the top cop in the scandal-plagued city. If Adams wins his case, which is being heard in Orange County, his pension would zoom to $510,000 a year, making him the second-highest-paid public pensioner in California. On the witness stand Thursday, Adams invoked his 5th Amendment right to not incriminate himself 20 times, including when asked about his Bell salary, which was among the highest law enforcement paychecks in the nation.
THE818NOW
September 5, 2012
The city of Bell took the unusual step Tuesday to sue its former Police Chief Randy Adams, alleging that he looked the other way when confronted with corruption in the city. Bell, a working-class city that paid outsized salaries to top administrators, filed suit Tuesday , saying Adams owes his former employer hundreds of thousands of dollars. The city wants Adams to repay his entire $457,000 annual salary and a portion of the $20 million the city estimates it lost as a result of a corruption scandal that led to the arrests of eight former civic leaders.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
When he was the top cop in Bell, Randy Adams was one of the highest-paid police chiefs in the nation. Now the city wants it all back. After years of scandal that has left the city on the brink of insolvency,  officials filed suit Tuesday, saying Adams, who joined the Bell force from Glendale, owes his old employers hundreds of thousands of dollars. Bell, a working-class city that paid huge salaries to its top administrators, said Adams must repay the city his entire $457,000 annual salary and a portion of the $20 million the city estimates it lost as a result of a corruption scandal that led to the arrests of eight former civic leaders.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
The police chief who was ousted after it was revealed that he and other city leaders in Bell were drawing enormous salaries has sued his former employers for severance pay. Randy Adams effectively stopped working for the city shortly after The Times revealed the high salaries paid to the former chief, as well as Chief Administrative Officer Robert Rizzo and Angela Spaccia, Rizzo's assistant. Adams was paid $457,000 annually, one of the highest law enforcement salaries in the nation and nearly 50% more than Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck is paid.
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