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Rationing

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FEATURES
July 1, 2009
At a time when the bottom line for all real estate development in Southern California needs to be sparing use of water, many Glendale projects propose to build and landscape extensive and very steep hillsides. Retention on such slopes is minimal, requiring frequent applications of water. When the prospect of rationing is looming and has already been implemented in many of the surrounding municipalities, shouldn?t our City Council and the various boards and commissions have had the foresight to have planned for such an event in Glendale?
FEATURES
April 25, 2009
Commemorating Armenian Genocide The week of remembrance in our city, and the annual Armenian Genocide observance and commemoration at the Alex Theatre, reminds us of two unavoidable and irrevocable facts. As an elected official, let me state them now from my heart in words so clear as to command their assent. We must never forget the Armenian Genocide and the indecency, inhumanity and the legacy of evil surrounding this tragic event. And, we must bring inexhaustible energy, heart, mind and sense of purpose and duty to ending the unmitigated shame and understated disgrace at the failure of our government in Washington to formally recognize this tragedy as historic fact.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | February 11, 2009
CITY HALL — Warnings of drastically reduced state water shipments to local agencies have put Glendale on the path to mandatory water rationing this summer, officials said Tuesday. Despite the storms across the Southland that have bumped up recent rain totals, years of drought conditions have left underground aquifers and reserves severely depleted, prompting local officials to start preparing their constituencies for the worst. “By July, we’re going to have mandatory water conservation,” said Peter Kavounas, assistant general manager of Glendale Water & Power.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 14, 2007
GLENDALE — Efforts to protect a tiny endangered fish in Northern California may lead to mandatory water rationing next year, especially if the Southland has another dry winter and allotments to water agencies are cut, officials said. Local water agencies are anxiously awaiting the fallout of a federal judge’s ruling two weeks ago that shuts down a major water pump in the Sacramento River delta — a major source for the Metropolitan Water District, which in turn provides half the water for the Crescenta Valley and 70% for Glendale.
NEWS
May 17, 2003
Apparently, a number of your readers have mistaken me for someone else. No, I am not some young, hapless schoolteacher attending a mysterious math event, or any other event, for that matter. I am well into retirement, living off a lifetime of well-placed (and hard-earned) investments. But given the level of viciousness of my critics, I can only feel sorry for anyone they have mistaken for me. Take Mr. Mills' recent letter attacking my character. Nowhere does he refute my point about the fundamental principles of America being antithetical to Christianity.
THE818NOW
February 6, 2012
California's proposed bullet train is being recalibrated. And designers may finally be on the right track. Sensitive to growing public and political opposition, high-speed rail officials seem to be coming to a rational conclusion: It makes good sense to begin service ASAP in urban areas where people might actually ride the trains. Construction still would start next fall in the rural San Joaquin Valley, the thinking goes. But simultaneously there'd be major upgrades to conventional lines in the Los Angeles and San Francisco regions.
NEWS
By Gary Huerta | May 17, 2012
WARNING: I am about to render an opinion on gay marriage. It may be unsuitable for audiences who are unwilling to entertain a rational debate. But before I dive into yet another liberal rant, it might be good to preface my opinion with some thoughts about rhetoric and steadfast beliefs. Rhetoric and unbending will destroy the ability to have a proverbial “aha” moment where an opinion can be expanded or changed and perception can grow. It's unfortunate that we have become a nation of sound bites and slogans.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
Sometimes in endless reveries spent mulling the state of things, I hit a mind block where I can't make heads or tails of what is going on, or where it leads. That's when I ask myself, “What if....” What if there really was a man in the moon, or it were made of green cheese? What if everybody's dreams could come true if only we believed enough? What if we got down to work together and actually tried to identify our communal problems and to solve them, or at least make things better, with mutual respect and a genuine desire to balance the competing needs, values and interests that each of us brings to the table?
NEWS
By Ryan Vaillancourt | October 10, 2007
GLENDALE — Local voluntary water conservation campaigns are not meeting targets, and water agencies are looking to put teeth into their plea to customers for less use, officials said. Amid the driest rain year in recorded county history, state water woes were exacerbated on Aug. 31 when a federal judge ruled in favor of halting pumping in the Sacramento River delta to protect an endangered fish. The delta has depleted a third of the supply going to the Metropolitan Water District, which provides up to half the water for the Crescenta Valley, 70% for Glendale and 49% for Burbank.
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NEWS
September 15, 2012
Sometimes in endless reveries spent mulling the state of things, I hit a mind block where I can't make heads or tails of what is going on, or where it leads. That's when I ask myself, “What if....” What if there really was a man in the moon, or it were made of green cheese? What if everybody's dreams could come true if only we believed enough? What if we got down to work together and actually tried to identify our communal problems and to solve them, or at least make things better, with mutual respect and a genuine desire to balance the competing needs, values and interests that each of us brings to the table?
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NEWS
By Gary Huerta | May 17, 2012
WARNING: I am about to render an opinion on gay marriage. It may be unsuitable for audiences who are unwilling to entertain a rational debate. But before I dive into yet another liberal rant, it might be good to preface my opinion with some thoughts about rhetoric and steadfast beliefs. Rhetoric and unbending will destroy the ability to have a proverbial “aha” moment where an opinion can be expanded or changed and perception can grow. It's unfortunate that we have become a nation of sound bites and slogans.
THE818NOW
February 6, 2012
California's proposed bullet train is being recalibrated. And designers may finally be on the right track. Sensitive to growing public and political opposition, high-speed rail officials seem to be coming to a rational conclusion: It makes good sense to begin service ASAP in urban areas where people might actually ride the trains. Construction still would start next fall in the rural San Joaquin Valley, the thinking goes. But simultaneously there'd be major upgrades to conventional lines in the Los Angeles and San Francisco regions.
FEATURES
October 25, 2009
Artificial lawns are not the way to go No, Vince Shellock, artificial turf is not a good idea (“Council: Make a call on artificial sod,” Oct. 24). For one thing, rain sheets off artificial turf and on to the street or a neighbor’s property. If it goes into the street, it could add to the flooding of the streets and overburden the sewers, while it would deprive trees of the ground water they need to survive. If it goes on to a neighbor’s property, it may increase the likelihood of slippage in the neighbor’s soil.
FEATURES
July 1, 2009
At a time when the bottom line for all real estate development in Southern California needs to be sparing use of water, many Glendale projects propose to build and landscape extensive and very steep hillsides. Retention on such slopes is minimal, requiring frequent applications of water. When the prospect of rationing is looming and has already been implemented in many of the surrounding municipalities, shouldn?t our City Council and the various boards and commissions have had the foresight to have planned for such an event in Glendale?
NEWS
By Jason Wells | February 11, 2009
CITY HALL — Warnings of drastically reduced state water shipments to local agencies have put Glendale on the path to mandatory water rationing this summer, officials said Tuesday. Despite the storms across the Southland that have bumped up recent rain totals, years of drought conditions have left underground aquifers and reserves severely depleted, prompting local officials to start preparing their constituencies for the worst. “By July, we’re going to have mandatory water conservation,” said Peter Kavounas, assistant general manager of Glendale Water & Power.
NEWS
By Ryan Vaillancourt | October 10, 2007
GLENDALE — Local voluntary water conservation campaigns are not meeting targets, and water agencies are looking to put teeth into their plea to customers for less use, officials said. Amid the driest rain year in recorded county history, state water woes were exacerbated on Aug. 31 when a federal judge ruled in favor of halting pumping in the Sacramento River delta to protect an endangered fish. The delta has depleted a third of the supply going to the Metropolitan Water District, which provides up to half the water for the Crescenta Valley, 70% for Glendale and 49% for Burbank.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 14, 2007
GLENDALE — Efforts to protect a tiny endangered fish in Northern California may lead to mandatory water rationing next year, especially if the Southland has another dry winter and allotments to water agencies are cut, officials said. Local water agencies are anxiously awaiting the fallout of a federal judge’s ruling two weeks ago that shuts down a major water pump in the Sacramento River delta — a major source for the Metropolitan Water District, which in turn provides half the water for the Crescenta Valley and 70% for Glendale.
NEWS
May 17, 2003
Apparently, a number of your readers have mistaken me for someone else. No, I am not some young, hapless schoolteacher attending a mysterious math event, or any other event, for that matter. I am well into retirement, living off a lifetime of well-placed (and hard-earned) investments. But given the level of viciousness of my critics, I can only feel sorry for anyone they have mistaken for me. Take Mr. Mills' recent letter attacking my character. Nowhere does he refute my point about the fundamental principles of America being antithetical to Christianity.
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