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NEWS
January 6, 2012
In her criticism of your headline for the review of the North Shore Burger restaurant, reader Marla Fogg seems to have missed a few points (“ Restaurant headline doesn't sit well ,” Jan. 2). She thinks that your use of the term “flat” was primarily trying to reference a surfing term when it merely reflected the reviewer's opinion that the restaurant was not exceptional. Lisa Dupuy wrote that the food was good, but far from great - her sandwich was overcooked and gave her heartburn, and the size of the bun didn't proportionally match the meat of the burger.
NEWS
May 13, 2005
FFOM THE EDITOR'S DESK by Katherine Gould I often wonder if we're really providing what our readers want from us. Generally, we get good feedback, so I think we are, but I'm always wondering what we could do better. So I was delighted Thursday morning to read Editor Carol Cormaci's column in the La Cañada Valley Sun, which spoke to this exact topic. Carol had found an item that ran in the Valley Sun 40 years ago on what a reader likes to see in his community newspaper. Carol lifted it word-for-word, and I'm lifting it from her. The piece ran in the late editor Joe DuPlain's column on Jan. 7, 1965.
NEWS
May 27, 2002
Joe Mandoky writes that he never believed in nor fought for slavery. But "a true American hero" is Robert E. Lee, who led an army to maintain chattel slavery -- the buying, selling and terrorizing of human beings. What would Union veterans of the greatest violent conflict in U.S. history think of Mandoky, who lauds Lee, the traitor to humanity? Approximately 365,000 Union soldiers died in the Civil War, including 37,000 blacks, in an epic struggle to rid the nation of the poison of slavery.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | December 7, 2013
Randy in Orange County wrote recently to ask about the following passage, which he came across in a newspaper article: “Pat Haden didn't fire Kiffin. He fired himself.” Randy found this troubling. “What does this technically mean? Who fired himself? Who is out of a job? Haden or Kiffin?” In fact, Randy knew the answers to these questions before he read the article. But the passage raised some larger issues and could even suggest an unfortunate trend. “It seems that more and more I'm running into troubling sentences and their pronoun usage,” Randy wrote.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | March 18, 2010
Good writing means keeping the reader engaged ? presenting meaningful information clearly and efficiently while always keeping the focus on substance. Pretty much any writing expert or grammar book says as much. But I?ve always found the advice a little presumptuous. I mean, who says you actually want to engage your reader? Maybe your goal is to put him to sleep. Maybe you want to assure that reading your information is so excruciating that the reader must struggle through every word.
NEWS
September 13, 2004
Re: Patrick Azadian's From The Margins column ("Manners gone in thin 'ear' ", Aug. 7). In this article, Mr. Azadian takes the readers by the "ear" and walks them through a carnival of images and its corresponding emotional impacts. He skillfully slips in a "double entendre" and uses the exaggerated visual of "the red underwear" and the "WOOOAHAHA" to create the vivid coloring and the burst of cheering sounds experienced in a fun excursion kind of a situation, to create a longer lasting impression in the unsuspecting reader's mind.
NEWS
October 25, 2001
What bugs me the most about your coverage of the ongoing Festivalgate controversy in Montrose is the photo your paper keeps running with the reader responses. That photo was taken four years ago. The kid driving the little train probably has his undergraduate degree by now. The festival looks nothing like the picture anymore. There are no spotless pavements or sparkling canopies over handsome vegetable stands. Now there are grimy, grease-stained streets and ratty, anemic-looking vegetables.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 18, 2012
Here's a sentence from an article I was editing recently: “What's more - aside from a specialized curriculum - private schools are notoriously known for their smaller classrooms.” It's the kind of sentence that might not command much attention from the reader. It gets the job done, sort of. So this sentence could slip by without much notice. But upon closer inspection, it's a train wreck. And by looking at all that's wrong with it, we find some excellent lessons in how anyone can improve his or her writing.
NEWS
January 6, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- It's about the size of a pack of cigarettes, it costs $95, and Glendale officials are hoping it will make their lives a lot easier. The small device, which reads fingerprints, is being installed on some of the city's computer terminals. It replaces the multiple passwords that employees have needed to get through the computers' security systems. Instead of typing in three passwords -- each of which needs to be eight digits long and gets changed every 90 days -- employees can press a thumb to the print reader and get right to work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | January 8, 2014
An author with local ties will be at Once Upon a Time bookstore this weekend to sign and read from a new book he co-wrote, “Glitter Girl,” which tells the story of two girls who have been friends since preschool and now find their friendship at a crossroads. Eighth-grade student Kat Connors serves as a main character in the book, a popular girl with a widely read blog on fashion and style. She faces a conflict when a cosmetic company called Glitter Girl approaches her, looking to feature their products on her blog.
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NEWS
By June Casagrande | December 7, 2013
Randy in Orange County wrote recently to ask about the following passage, which he came across in a newspaper article: “Pat Haden didn't fire Kiffin. He fired himself.” Randy found this troubling. “What does this technically mean? Who fired himself? Who is out of a job? Haden or Kiffin?” In fact, Randy knew the answers to these questions before he read the article. But the passage raised some larger issues and could even suggest an unfortunate trend. “It seems that more and more I'm running into troubling sentences and their pronoun usage,” Randy wrote.
COMMUNITY
May 29, 2013
Readers in the greater Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena have already demonstrated their cooking prowess with the L.A. Times Holiday Cookie Bake-Off, now, they'll have to prove it on the grill. Just a few more days are left for readers to submit their recipes for the 2013 Battle of the Burgers at the L.A. Times, parent company of Times Community News. It's competitive, but there are major bragging rights that come with winning these things. To submit a an entry, go to the L.A. Times Food Facebook page and submit your recipe , along with a short essay about why it's the burger that should rise above the competition (this would be where you relay stories of people crying with joy at the first bite)
NEWS
By June Casagrande | June 9, 2012
On the hit NBC comedy “Parks and Recreation,” Rob Lowe plays Chris Traeger, a hyper-enthusiastic city administrator with a trademark hyperbole: He says “literally” a lot. A lot. Anything at all could be “literally” the greatest thing he's ever seen. Anyone who charms him or impresses him with some admirable trait could be “literally” his favorite person. His zeal is so sincere that you don't even want to punch him in the head. It's funny because it's implausible.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 18, 2012
Here's a sentence from an article I was editing recently: “What's more - aside from a specialized curriculum - private schools are notoriously known for their smaller classrooms.” It's the kind of sentence that might not command much attention from the reader. It gets the job done, sort of. So this sentence could slip by without much notice. But upon closer inspection, it's a train wreck. And by looking at all that's wrong with it, we find some excellent lessons in how anyone can improve his or her writing.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
In her criticism of your headline for the review of the North Shore Burger restaurant, reader Marla Fogg seems to have missed a few points (“ Restaurant headline doesn't sit well ,” Jan. 2). She thinks that your use of the term “flat” was primarily trying to reference a surfing term when it merely reflected the reviewer's opinion that the restaurant was not exceptional. Lisa Dupuy wrote that the food was good, but far from great - her sandwich was overcooked and gave her heartburn, and the size of the bun didn't proportionally match the meat of the burger.
NEWS
March 18, 2011
Once you’ve seen “embarrass,” and “supersede” and “its” in print a million times, there’s a chance that the next time you write one of these words, you’ll get it right without thinking about it — a better chance than for people who don’t read as much, anyway. That’s why an SAT test prep company I worked for years ago had us tell students in our vocabulary course: read, read, read. But every once in a while, I come across a spelling or punctuation issue so odd that no amount of innate word smarts can save you. This came to my attention recently when a very word-savvy friend, author Carolyn Howard-Johnson, asked me how to write “conscience’ sake.” “Seems like something you’d remember if you’d ever looked it up,” she wrote.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | September 28, 2010
I got an interesting e-mail recently from a reader who wanted to know about using "with" with an "ing" verb in "Robert took out a loan, with his house serving as collateral. " Joel wanted to know: Is that structure grammatical? Is it stylistically acceptable? It was clear that Joel doesn't like this structure, but he wasn't sure how to understand it. All it takes is a little grammar to see how all pieces of a sentence like this work together and whether they're working correctly.
NEWS
Dan Kimber | July 30, 2010
Editor's Note: Numerous instances of plagiarism have been discovered in Dan Kimber's “Education Matters” column, which ran in the News- Press from September 2003 to September 2011. In those columns where plagiarism has been found, a For the Record specifying the details will be appended to the piece. I asked you last week for examples of things today that are better than they were "back in the day," leaving both periods indefinite, time-wise, and inviting any and all comparisons.
NEWS
Dan Kimber | June 11, 2010
Editor's Note: Numerous instances of plagiarism have been discovered in Dan Kimber's “Education Matters” column, which ran in the News- Press from September 2003 to September 2011. In those columns where plagiarism has been found, a For the Record specifying the details will be appended to the piece. T his week was the last confrontation between my seniors and juniors in a contest billed as "Ultimate Americana. " Call it cultural literacy or trivia - it's a collection of questions and associations to stretch young minds, challenge their intellect and occasionally test their sense of humor.
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