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NEWS
By Joylene Wagner and By Joylene Wagner | March 21, 2014
Employers have been talking for years about their challenges finding young employees who are ready for the workplace. They complain of high school and college graduates who lack problem-solving skills, can't work independently or don't function well on a team. They report new hires lacking soft skills such as timeliness and respect for authority. Educators have once again responded to the business world, much as they did in the mid-1990s when schools shifted the focus of their attention to student outcomes such as test scores tied to subject-matter standards.
NEWS
By Josh Cox, joshua.cox@latimes.com | January 12, 2013
Roderick Hutchinson knows what it means to sacrifice. Hutchinson, a student at the Verdugo Fire Academy in Glendale, was faced with an unimaginable decision following the death of his sister in September. Her funeral was scheduled on a mandatory training day at the academy, and attending would have made Hutchinson ineligible to complete the program. “It took every fiber of my being not to throw everything down and hop on a plane and never look back on this year,” he said. “But I knew that this is exactly where my sister wanted me to be, and that I had made the right decision.” Hutchinson was one of 38 cadets who graduated from the Verdugo Fire Academy Class XV during a ceremony Saturday at Glendale Community College.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
One of the silliest things you'll hear as a new graduate is "now you're entering the real world." High school is the real world. There are real pains and struggles, as well as love and triumph. What graduates are entering is the real world without a safety net. Even bad parents and teachers are supposed to make sure kids have enough to eat and a place to sleep. After graduating, kids suddenly are responsible for their own everyday lives, not to mention their futures.
NEWS
May 15, 2001
To all parents who have kids riding the Beeline back and forth to Wilson or Toll middle schools, do you have any idea how these kids act away from home? They are rude, foul-mouthed, and heaven forbid they get up and let either a handicapped rider or senior citizen have their seat. They put backpacks on the seat beside them even when the bus is crowded. Then there is the graffiti. I know there are a lot of good kids at these schools. I wish I could say it is just a very few kids acting this way, but it's not. Please, all of you parents out there, talk to your children.
NEWS
November 11, 2008
The Glendale News-Press visited an art class at Daily High School and asked students, ?What do you like most about art?? ? ?It?s colorful. It?s a way to express myself.? WOLF LONGINO, 16 Highland Park ? ? ? ? ?I like the fact that you can experiment.? JAMES MOYA, 17 Glendale ? ? ? ? ? ? ?It?s always fun to me, and it?s a way to express my feelings.? HECTOR HUERTA, 17 Glendale ?
LOCAL
By Mary O'Keefe | July 9, 2004
Some students look forward to summer as a break from getting up early, going to school, and doing homework. Garam Song is looking forward to a summer spent surrounded by scientists and new discoveries about the universe. Song will be working at JPL. Song, 16, actually started his job at JPL in March of this year but will be putting in more time during the summer. A senior next year at Crescenta Valley High School, Song was recommended for the job by CVHS computer science teacher and JPL employee Greg Neat.
NEWS
October 31, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman Libertarian Bob New would like to return to the days when people left their doors unlocked at night and their cars in the driveway with the keys in the ignition. "You've been misled by your own government that they're protecting you," New said. "We have a country controlled by bureaucrats with little experience in the real world. More and more, people are realizing that we've been played for a sucker by the government." New, is running against incumbent Democrat Carol Liu (D-La Canada Flintridge)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2007
The prominent Mexican director Guillermo del Toro has produced in "Pan's Labyrinth," a chilling yet endearing masterpiece that juxtaposes a child's intricate fantasy world with the brutal real world of post-civil war Spain. A contradiction in terms? Not at all, if you can remember some of Grimm's fairy tales that offered bucolic settings of gingerbread houses, but also held descriptions of severed ears and ugly witches baking small children in stone ovens. This finely woven tale pulled the audience along at will and I found it difficult to think about anything but the story at hand for the entire two-hour running time.
NEWS
June 25, 2005
Darleene Barrientos As her classmates chatted animatedly and fidgeted with their blue and white robes, ready to walk into the next chapter of their lives, Aimee Hwang stood still and quiet Saturday in the midst of the excitement. Wearing the cords of the National Honor Society, the National Beta Club and the gold stole of the California Scholarship Federation, the 19-year-old Glendale resident will be pre-med at USC this fall. But in spite of knowing what the fall would bring, Hwang felt anxious about taking the next big step in her life.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | November 27, 2007
Giovanni Militello, a sixth-grader at Fremont Elementary School, kissed his $100 bill goodbye as he placed it in a container with bills of different denominations. The 11-year-old spent the money on homeowners insurance after he spent $2,500 on his mortgage and $350 for property tax. Giovanni was one of about 30 students who were getting a taste of the real world. Students used a work sheet to calculate their expenses and budget if they were to earn $4,375 a month. They were given play money to spend on their mortgage, gas, electricity, phone, life insurance, car and other relevant expenses that accrue in real life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joylene Wagner and By Joylene Wagner | March 21, 2014
Employers have been talking for years about their challenges finding young employees who are ready for the workplace. They complain of high school and college graduates who lack problem-solving skills, can't work independently or don't function well on a team. They report new hires lacking soft skills such as timeliness and respect for authority. Educators have once again responded to the business world, much as they did in the mid-1990s when schools shifted the focus of their attention to student outcomes such as test scores tied to subject-matter standards.
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NEWS
March 15, 2013
Online education is #trending. There are TED talks, a wildly popular inspirational and educational lecture series with the tagline, “ideas worth spreading.” There are MOOCs, or massive open online courses, offered by the finest universities in the United States. And don't forget iTunes U, which aggregates it all in one easily navigable platform. You can study Roman architecture with art history majors at Yale. You can immerse yourself in economics at webcast.berkeley. English not your first language?
NEWS
By Josh Cox, joshua.cox@latimes.com | January 12, 2013
Roderick Hutchinson knows what it means to sacrifice. Hutchinson, a student at the Verdugo Fire Academy in Glendale, was faced with an unimaginable decision following the death of his sister in September. Her funeral was scheduled on a mandatory training day at the academy, and attending would have made Hutchinson ineligible to complete the program. “It took every fiber of my being not to throw everything down and hop on a plane and never look back on this year,” he said. “But I knew that this is exactly where my sister wanted me to be, and that I had made the right decision.” Hutchinson was one of 38 cadets who graduated from the Verdugo Fire Academy Class XV during a ceremony Saturday at Glendale Community College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph, joyce.rudolph@latimes.com | November 6, 2010
The scent of baked bread mingled with chopped onion and celery in the kitchen of the Los Robles building on the Glendale Community College campus. It was 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, and students in the Advanced Food Preparation class were completing the dishes for the weekly luncheon at the Culinary Arts Department's restaurant. The theme was Florribbean, which combined the tastes of Florida and the Caribbean islands. The entrees were jerk chicken with pineapple chutney, coconut curry mahi-mahi or stuffed chayote squash.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | December 30, 2008
Students in a Wilson Middle School industrial technology class were not on the same page on a recent Thursday. They weren’t seated in the same area or studying the same subject. Some were at computer stations, clicking through on-screen “virtual architecture” drawings, while others were putting the finishing touches on miniature paper rockets or punching buttons to compose music on an electric keyboard. “We watch a movie with the volume all the way down, and we have to make our own music,” said 12-year-old Vrej Bejanian, who was working at one of the 17 modules that teams of seventh-graders were stationed at during the class.
NEWS
November 11, 2008
The Glendale News-Press visited an art class at Daily High School and asked students, ?What do you like most about art?? ? ?It?s colorful. It?s a way to express myself.? WOLF LONGINO, 16 Highland Park ? ? ? ? ?I like the fact that you can experiment.? JAMES MOYA, 17 Glendale ? ? ? ? ? ? ?It?s always fun to me, and it?s a way to express my feelings.? HECTOR HUERTA, 17 Glendale ?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2007
The prominent Mexican director Guillermo del Toro has produced in "Pan's Labyrinth," a chilling yet endearing masterpiece that juxtaposes a child's intricate fantasy world with the brutal real world of post-civil war Spain. A contradiction in terms? Not at all, if you can remember some of Grimm's fairy tales that offered bucolic settings of gingerbread houses, but also held descriptions of severed ears and ugly witches baking small children in stone ovens. This finely woven tale pulled the audience along at will and I found it difficult to think about anything but the story at hand for the entire two-hour running time.
LOCAL
By Mary O'Keefe | July 15, 2005
The questions to some of the medical world's most complex diseases may be answered by the high school student sitting next to you at the local fast food restaurant. Crescenta Valley High School students are joining medical research teams throughout the Los Angeles area researching diseases like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. These students are part of the UC approved science elective class. The classes connect students to medical research institutions. Students had to not only be an active member of the research team but also complete a poster and paper explaining their research, results and value.
NEWS
June 25, 2005
Darleene Barrientos As her classmates chatted animatedly and fidgeted with their blue and white robes, ready to walk into the next chapter of their lives, Aimee Hwang stood still and quiet Saturday in the midst of the excitement. Wearing the cords of the National Honor Society, the National Beta Club and the gold stole of the California Scholarship Federation, the 19-year-old Glendale resident will be pre-med at USC this fall. But in spite of knowing what the fall would bring, Hwang felt anxious about taking the next big step in her life.
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