Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsRed Planet
IN THE NEWS

Red Planet

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 6, 2004
Robert Chacon Residents don't need special clearance from Jet Propulsion Laboratory or NASA to see up-to-the-minute pictures of Mars' bleak landscape. All they need to do is turn their televisions to Charter Communications Channel 15. The public-access channel began airing live coverage of the space mission Monday, and will continue to do so indefinitely, with limited interruptions. The space agency's Spirit rover landed Saturday on Mars' Gusev Crater, and within hours began sending back pictures.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | May 13, 2011
A scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is lobbying for a new Mars lander that would perform an unprecedented study of the Red Planet's interior. It is one of three concepts in the running for future NASA funding through the competitive Discovery Program. The proposed Geophysical Monitoring Station (GEMS) would pack a scientific payload that includes a thermal probe, seismometer and orbital tracking system. All are tools for discovering the inner composition of Mars to help explain the largely unknown story of that planet's beginnings — and to some degree, Earth's — said JPL's Bruce Banerdt, who would lead the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | January 18, 2013
The car-sized rover Curiosity had a clean landing on Mars five months ago. But planetary missions didn't always run so smoothly at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Mariner 3, a probe sent to do a first-ever flyby in 1964, failed to get to the Red Planet during a stressful time at the space agency. Engineers were under intense pressure to beat Russia in the space race. Another spacecraft launched three weeks later, Mariner 4, eventually made it to Mars. It returned the first grainy close-up images of a foreign terrain.
NEWS
November 15, 2000
Bad outweighs good Summer Grindle of La Crescenta is a sophomore at Los Angeles County High School for the Arts. The newest in a handful of Murphy's Law space movies, "Red Planet" is so far the most palatable, but that isn't saying much. This particular space spectacle begins with a casual, and useless, narrative, but soon becomes passively entertaining, with Val Kilmer, music by Sting and a few well-written lines. But the bad far outweighs the good.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
The Curiosity rover is within 100 days of landing on Mars, and JPL scientists are jazzed about the upcoming adventures of the biggest rover yet sent to the Red Planet. The Mini Cooper-sized vehicle, ensconced within the Mars Science Laboratory, is speeding toward the Red Planet, rapidly whittling away the 352-million-mile journey. Meanwhile, on Monday, a handful of journalists gathered in the California desert for a confab with Caltech's John Grotzinger, project scientist for Curiosity.
NEWS
By Amy Hubbard | November 18, 2013
MAVEN is on schedule for its launch to Mars today. The NASA spacecraft will explore how the Red Planet went from wet and "friendly" to dry and dusty, the Los Angeles Times reported . Teams prepping for liftoff had thumbs pointed up Monday as the countdown continued. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution -- MAVEN -- will launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The window for launch is 10:28 a.m. to 12:28 p.m. PST.  You can watch it live in the stream below.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
NASA's Curiosity rover has found evidence that Mars could have once held life, scientists said Tuesday. The one-ton rover drilled into a rock last month and collected a sample that contained essential ingredients for life on Earth, including hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon, according to NASA. Scientists believe those same elements would have provided a habitable environment for life on the Red Planet billions of years ago. "We have found a habitable environment that is so benign and supportive of life, that if you would have been on the planet, you would have been able to drink [the water]
NEWS
By Michael Arvizu | May 29, 2010
Over the next few months, NASA scientists will begin to analyze information gathered by the Phoenix Mars Lander, whose mission ended earlier this week after unsuccessful attempts to communicate with the craft. The announcement comes two years after the Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the Red Planet. The mission began May 25, 2008, and lasted five months — two months beyond its operating expectancy, scientists said. “It did its job better than expected,” said Dr. Deborah Bass, deputy project scientist for the Phoenix Mission.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
Conway W. Snyder, eminent space scientist and long-time resident of La Crescenta, died in Redlands on April 14 th at the age of 93. Born in Macon, Missouri, in 1918, Snyder moved to California in 1932. He earned a BA in Physics from the University of Redlands in 1939, and an MS from the University of Iowa. He married Marjorie Frisius in 1943. The couple had three children. During World War II, Snyder worked on the Manhattan Project and was present at first atomic bomb test.
NEWS
By Tracey Laity | March 11, 2006
LA CA—ADA FLINTRIDGE ? After nearly 30 minutes of nail-biting silence, staff at Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mission Control erupted into whoops and hollers of joy as the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter came back into radio contact on Friday afternoon. As the spacecraft, one of the largest and most technologically advanced ever to be sent to Mars, briefly disappeared behind the red planet and fell out of radio contact with Earth at 1:46 p.m., the future of the $720-million mission literally hung in the balance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Deborah Netburn | January 22, 2014
After 10 years of wheeling around Mars , NASA's Opportunity rover has discovered a rock shaped like a jelly doughnut that seems to have appeared out of thin Martian air. "One of the things I like to say is Mars keeps throwing things at us," Steven Squyres, principal investigator for the Mars Exploration Rover Mission, said in a presentation   describing Opportunity's first decade on Mars as well as the mysterious rock. In late December, Opportunity snapped an image of a rocky outcropping on the Red Planet with no rock the size and shape of a jelly doughnut, the Los Angeles Times reports . But 12 days later, when the rover took another picture of the same area, the jelly doughnut-like rock was there.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | November 19, 2013
Mars is a cold and dusty place with no known life. But scientists believe that the planet was once more like Earth, with a warm climate that supported oceans and lakes. The NASA spacecraft MAVEN will explore the Mars' atmosphere in a quest to find out how the planet could have experienced such a drastic change in climate. MAVEN, or Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, launched into space on Monday from Cape Canaveral, Fla. at 10:28 a.m. PST from an Atlas V rocket. The spacecraft is expected to reach Mars orbit in September 2014.
NEWS
By Amy Hubbard | November 18, 2013
MAVEN is on schedule for its launch to Mars today. The NASA spacecraft will explore how the Red Planet went from wet and "friendly" to dry and dusty, the Los Angeles Times reported . Teams prepping for liftoff had thumbs pointed up Monday as the countdown continued. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution -- MAVEN -- will launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The window for launch is 10:28 a.m. to 12:28 p.m. PST.  You can watch it live in the stream below.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 30, 2013
Jeweler and watchmaker Garo Anserlian first started working on timepieces over 40 years ago, and his work has followed him from Beirut to Montrose - but Anserlian never expected his work would one day be connected to another planet. Since 2004, Anserlian, owner of Executive Jewelers and Executive Clock Gallery on Honolulu and Ocean View avenues in Montrose, has created custom mechanical watches that are based on a day on Mars, which is 24 hours and 39 1/2 minutes. Even as new technology has offered other options for the scientists and engineers who were the original customers for the special watches, Anserlian said his Mars connection has brought him new business from collectors and space enthusiasts.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity celebrated its first year this week since landing on the Red Planet, and scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have been looking back on the year since its nail-biting arrival with the "seven minutes of terror. " The rover drilled, lasered and imaged its way across 1.08 miles of Martian terrain during that first year, making some ground-breaking discoveries along the way. But now, scientists say, they're looking forward to the new year -- and the new set of challenges it will bring.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
NASA's Curiosity rover has found evidence that Mars could have once held life, scientists said Tuesday. The one-ton rover drilled into a rock last month and collected a sample that contained essential ingredients for life on Earth, including hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon, according to NASA. Scientists believe those same elements would have provided a habitable environment for life on the Red Planet billions of years ago. "We have found a habitable environment that is so benign and supportive of life, that if you would have been on the planet, you would have been able to drink [the water]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | January 18, 2013
The car-sized rover Curiosity had a clean landing on Mars five months ago. But planetary missions didn't always run so smoothly at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Mariner 3, a probe sent to do a first-ever flyby in 1964, failed to get to the Red Planet during a stressful time at the space agency. Engineers were under intense pressure to beat Russia in the space race. Another spacecraft launched three weeks later, Mariner 4, eventually made it to Mars. It returned the first grainy close-up images of a foreign terrain.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
The Curiosity rover is within 100 days of landing on Mars, and JPL scientists are jazzed about the upcoming adventures of the biggest rover yet sent to the Red Planet. The Mini Cooper-sized vehicle, ensconced within the Mars Science Laboratory, is speeding toward the Red Planet, rapidly whittling away the 352-million-mile journey. Meanwhile, on Monday, a handful of journalists gathered in the California desert for a confab with Caltech's John Grotzinger, project scientist for Curiosity.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
Conway W. Snyder, eminent space scientist and long-time resident of La Crescenta, died in Redlands on April 14 th at the age of 93. Born in Macon, Missouri, in 1918, Snyder moved to California in 1932. He earned a BA in Physics from the University of Redlands in 1939, and an MS from the University of Iowa. He married Marjorie Frisius in 1943. The couple had three children. During World War II, Snyder worked on the Manhattan Project and was present at first atomic bomb test.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | May 13, 2011
A scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is lobbying for a new Mars lander that would perform an unprecedented study of the Red Planet's interior. It is one of three concepts in the running for future NASA funding through the competitive Discovery Program. The proposed Geophysical Monitoring Station (GEMS) would pack a scientific payload that includes a thermal probe, seismometer and orbital tracking system. All are tools for discovering the inner composition of Mars to help explain the largely unknown story of that planet's beginnings — and to some degree, Earth's — said JPL's Bruce Banerdt, who would lead the project.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|