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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2011
In November, refugees from Iraq, Iran, Uganda, Egypt and Eritrea celebrated Thanksgiving at the International Rescue Committee's Glendale location. It was the second annual Thanksgiving celebration that the International Rescue Committee has hosted. Many people enjoyed roast turkey and traditional fixings. The International Rescue Committee works in more than 40 countries in areas of conflict or war to provide people with clean water, health care, shelter and sanitation. The IRC annually helps to resettle thousands of refugees in 22 cities across the nation.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 26, 2012
St. Matthew's Lutheran Church in Glendale won a $5,000 grant from a Minnesota-based organization to help secure food, clothing and a home for local refugees and others in need as they work with the Atwater Village-based Interfaith Refugee & Immigration Service, or IRIS. The church won the grant from the Minneapolis-based Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Foundation. For every dollar raised by the church from donors through March 31, the foundation will match up to 50 cents per dollar, or up to $5,000 more.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | August 10, 2012
In the fall of 1975, several refugees from war-torn Vietnam arrived in Glendale. They had been attending orientation classes at Camp Pendleton and were still there when several local church members offered them temporary homes. None spoke English when they arrived here. In a recent letter, Nena Kelty, one of a group that stepped forward to assist them, wrote, “I don't think many of your readers know of Glendale's part in welcoming and assisting the Vietnamese refugees. The kindness and generosity its residents exhibited in helping these unfortunate people who fled their homeland in terror went largely unrecognized.” She learned of the situation when someone from Gospel Lighthouse Publications, at 110 East Broadway, contacted her group, California Literacy, requesting a tutor-training workshop.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | September 14, 2005
I try to keep this column light and funny, but anyone holding a newspaper right now can understand why I'm not feeling too blithe. So with apologies for the change in tone, I'd like to talk about the hurricane-related language issue that's been making headlines, namely, the use of the word "refugees." A number of media outlets have used this word to describe the people displaced by Hurricane Katrina, that is, people seeking refuge. Others, including a number of black leaders, have found this word deeply troubling and offensive.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | September 18, 2005
I try to keep this column light and funny, but anyone holding a newspaper right now can understand why I'm not feeling too blithe. So with apologies for the change in tone, I'd like to talk about the hurricane-related language issue that's been making headlines, namely, the use of the word "refugees." A number of media outlets have used this word to describe the people displaced by Hurricane Katrina, that is, people seeking refuge. Others, including a number of black leaders, have found this word deeply troubling and offensive.
NEWS
December 3, 1999
The Herbert Hoover High School French Club and a group of French students organized a concert held at Eleanor J. Toll Middle School Thursday night to benefit African refugees. While working on a project for their third-year French class, juniors Carmen Serrano and Anna Panici learned of the plight of refugees from Congo, formerly Zaire, and decided to find a way to raise money to help those who have been displaced by ethnic violence. The event featured performances by local rock band Shplang and singer and guitarist Danny Donnelly.
NEWS
By: Mark R. Madler | September 7, 2005
Lifelong New Orleans resident Gregory Johnson saw his hometown turn into what seemed like a war zone whose inhabitants did all they could to just stay alive. In the days following Hurricane Katrina slamming into the city, the 23-year-old truck driver experienced a sense of disbelief as he saw his neighbors left behind as other residents were able to get out. "At nighttime, the only lights we had were the gunshots," Johnson said. "You couldn't take a wrong turn or you might end up in some water that you can't get out of."
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 1, 2011
A group of Burbank High School students had a chat with students in the Djabal refugee camp in Goz Beida, Chad, Wednesday morning — a conversation made possible via a Web cam. It was 6:45 a.m. in Burbank, but 3:45 p.m. at the Obama School in Chad, where boys were dressed in collared shirts with vests, girls mostly in white with matching hijabs. Isabel Navarro asked the first question: “What do you want to be when you grow up?” When a girl on the other end of the webcast replied, “An actor,” the Burbank students giggled softly.
NEWS
November 15, 2007
Families must bear some cost of refugees Regarding the Friday story ?War-torn families cope, hope?: Everyone certainly has sympathy for innocent residents of war-torn countries. However, who is going to financially support the refugees from these areas? Will it be their families, who are already residents here? Or will it be all of us in the form of tax-supported programs for free healthcare, food, cash and housing assistance? Is this really appropriate while U.S.-born citizens, who paid taxes for many years, then fell on hard times, are denied the very same benefits?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2013
A petition on Whitehouse.gov is urging President Barack Obama to display a rug woven by Armenian orphans at a refugee camp in 1920. The tapestry was donated to President Calvin Coolidge in 1925, as a gift to thank Americans for their humanitarian support following World War I. The carpet has remained in storage and was expected to make its debut on Dec. 16 during a Smithsonian event and book launch for Hagop Martin Deranian's " ...
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 26, 2012
St. Matthew's Lutheran Church in Glendale won a $5,000 grant from a Minnesota-based organization to help secure food, clothing and a home for local refugees and others in need as they work with the Atwater Village-based Interfaith Refugee & Immigration Service, or IRIS. The church won the grant from the Minneapolis-based Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Foundation. For every dollar raised by the church from donors through March 31, the foundation will match up to 50 cents per dollar, or up to $5,000 more.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | August 10, 2012
In the fall of 1975, several refugees from war-torn Vietnam arrived in Glendale. They had been attending orientation classes at Camp Pendleton and were still there when several local church members offered them temporary homes. None spoke English when they arrived here. In a recent letter, Nena Kelty, one of a group that stepped forward to assist them, wrote, “I don't think many of your readers know of Glendale's part in welcoming and assisting the Vietnamese refugees. The kindness and generosity its residents exhibited in helping these unfortunate people who fled their homeland in terror went largely unrecognized.” She learned of the situation when someone from Gospel Lighthouse Publications, at 110 East Broadway, contacted her group, California Literacy, requesting a tutor-training workshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2011
In November, refugees from Iraq, Iran, Uganda, Egypt and Eritrea celebrated Thanksgiving at the International Rescue Committee's Glendale location. It was the second annual Thanksgiving celebration that the International Rescue Committee has hosted. Many people enjoyed roast turkey and traditional fixings. The International Rescue Committee works in more than 40 countries in areas of conflict or war to provide people with clean water, health care, shelter and sanitation. The IRC annually helps to resettle thousands of refugees in 22 cities across the nation.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 1, 2011
A group of Burbank High School students had a chat with students in the Djabal refugee camp in Goz Beida, Chad, Wednesday morning — a conversation made possible via a Web cam. It was 6:45 a.m. in Burbank, but 3:45 p.m. at the Obama School in Chad, where boys were dressed in collared shirts with vests, girls mostly in white with matching hijabs. Isabel Navarro asked the first question: “What do you want to be when you grow up?” When a girl on the other end of the webcast replied, “An actor,” the Burbank students giggled softly.
NEWS
November 15, 2007
Families must bear some cost of refugees Regarding the Friday story ?War-torn families cope, hope?: Everyone certainly has sympathy for innocent residents of war-torn countries. However, who is going to financially support the refugees from these areas? Will it be their families, who are already residents here? Or will it be all of us in the form of tax-supported programs for free healthcare, food, cash and housing assistance? Is this really appropriate while U.S.-born citizens, who paid taxes for many years, then fell on hard times, are denied the very same benefits?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2007
The Refugees will be making their second appearance at the intimate Coffee Gallery in Altadena on Wednesday night, July 25 at 7 p.m. The trio represent an incredible convergence of songwriting and high-level performing talent, award winning as soloists and in bands. Each will perform her individual songs accompanied by the other two on guitars, bass, melodica, keyboards, percussion, mandolin, harmonica, and glorious harmonies, culminating in the creation of new and unique renditions of their exceptional work.
FEATURES
By Charly Shelton | May 4, 2007
Elementary through high school students along with teachers and parents from the Crescenta Valley area opted to sleep in cardboard boxes on the hard ground at the Los Angeles Fairgrounds in Pomona last Saturday night as part of a social experiment called "Displace Me." Inspired by the documentary "Invisible Children," the night of April 28 was a way to bring home the reality of what is happening to thousands of children in Uganda. During an assembly at the high school last month, the "Invisible Children" program sent representatives to share not only the documentary but information on the organization that has its roots in the film.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | January 30, 2007
GLENDALE — For the more than 2,000 refugee students within the Glendale school system, help fitting into their new surroundings is here for at least three more years. The Glendale Unified School District will receive almost $500,000 over the next three years in a grant that was announced Monday from the California Department of Education and Department of Social Services. “Many [refugees] have very tragic backgrounds that caused them some serious damage,” Glendale board of education President Chuck SambarÖ said.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | November 14, 2006
GLENDALE ? Two school-district programs that have helped refugee families adapt to the educational system will receive statewide honors next month. The California School Boards Assn. will present the Golden Bell Award to the Glendale Unified School District, officials announced Monday. The award, which the association will present on Dec. 2, recognizes outstanding public-school programs throughout the state. Project Grace2 and the Welcome Center were the two district programs that earned the honor.
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