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NEWS
September 23, 2011
A bill by Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Silver Lake) would take the power of the road for renewable energy. The bill, one of many the Gov. Jerry Brown is wading through in the wake of the legislative recess, would require the California Energy Commission to explore the possibility of generating green electricity from passing cars, trucks and trains. The legislation centers on what's called piezoelectric technology, where censors are placed under a roadway and the vibrations produced by vehicles are converted into electricity.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 9, 2012
Once ahead of the game, Glendale has turned its focus from future gains in renewable energy to meeting more short-term state deadlines that it may, in the end, just eke through. All California public utilities must get 20% of their energy from renewable sources by 2013, and then 33% by 2020. As of 2011, Glendale Water & Power was well on its way to meeting the benchmarks, logging a 24% renewable rate at one point. In fact, it was doing so well that it decided to sell some of its renewable energy credits to Pasadena for $5.5 million.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | April 23, 2009
GLENDORA — Republican Assemblyman Anthony Adams joined Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to promote renewable energy technology at an Earth Day news conference here Wednesday showcasing an array of solar panels on a Walmart rooftop. Adams said he is promoting several proposals to push for green energy solutions including one that would encourage energy companies to produce biofuels out of organic waste. “We’re hoping to harvest the 40 million tons of organic waste that literally gets thrown into our landfills every year,” Adams said of his plan.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | October 13, 2009
GLENDALE — Utility officials expressed relief Monday after the governor vetoed legislation that would have mandated that utilities use in-state resources to cut emissions 33% by 2020. In September, state legislators passed a pair of bills that would require renewable energy — such as solar, wind and geothermal energy — to make up a third of a city’s power portfolio by 2020. The bills did not count new out-of-state contracts toward meeting that requirement, frustrating utilities like those in Glendale and Burbank that have tied their renewable energy procurements to outside projects.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | June 29, 2013
The City Council established earlier this week a new state-mandated program for Glendale Water & Power to purchase locally generated renewable energy. The council passed an ordinance on Tuesday adopting a so-called feed-in tariff program under which local generators of renewable energy can sign on for 10, 15, or 20 years to sell 100% of the power they generate to the city at rates calculated to equal the cost of obtaining that electricity elsewhere. Glendale was required by law to establish a tariff program by July 1. The state-wide program was mandated by California State Senate Bill 1122 in 2008 as a means of helping California utilities meet the state's renewable energy requirements.
NEWS
By Maria Hsin, maria.hsin@latimes.com | October 2, 2011
For all the tens of millions of dollars being spent in Burbank and Glendale for new smart-meter grids, the added efficiencies won't directly affect state mandates for renewable energy, officials say. In Glendale, the tab for new smart meters - which provide customers with real-time tracking for energy use - is $70 million. In Burbank, that cost will be roughly $60 million. The two cities found themselves at the forefront of the national movement when they received a $20-million federal grant to help fund the massive infrastructure projects.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | December 25, 2009
Michael Peevey, president of the California Public Utilities Commission and husband of state Sen. Carol Liu (D-La Cañada Flintridge), was reappointed to his post last week for another six-year term. The appointment came a week after the state Senate refused to hold a hearing to reappoint Peevey’s fellow commissioner, Rachelle Chong, who had come under fire from consumer groups for her efforts to deregulate phone services. Opponents of the proposal argued it could be detrimental to low-income residents.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 9, 2011
Glendale is well on its way to meeting state mandates that require cities to get 33% of their energy supplies from renewable resources such as wind, solar or landfill gas by 2020. The state law, which takes effect Saturday, sets intermediary targets - the first of which Glendale Water & Power has already beat. Officials say the utility currently has a renewable energy portfolio of 21%, above the first intermediary target of 20% by Dec. 31, 2013. The second target is 25% from renewable energy sources by Dec. 31, 2016.
NEWS
July 24, 2008
The City Council on Tuesday gave final approval to a new renewable energy program through Glendale Water & Power. Called the Green Partners program, customers will be given the option of powering their homes using 100% renewable energy. Business owners and residents who take part in the program opt to lock in a fixed, five-year ?Green Partners Charge? in lieu of the more volatile fuel adjustment charge, which is adjusted on a regular basis to cover the changing costs of power and fuel purchases for the utility.
NEWS
By Mark Kellam and Brittany Levine mark.kellam@latimes.com, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 2, 2011
It's a tale of two cities in two very different positions as the utilities in Burbank and Glendale work to meet strict state mandates for using renewable energy. At 21%, Glendale Water & Power is ahead of schedule in hitting the first benchmark - that public utilities must get 20% of their power from renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar and geothermal, by Dec. 31, 2013. Steve Lins, assistant general manager of supplies, told the Glendale City Council on Tuesday that the utility was “well on track.” “We're way ahead of the game,” he said.
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NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | June 29, 2013
The City Council established earlier this week a new state-mandated program for Glendale Water & Power to purchase locally generated renewable energy. The council passed an ordinance on Tuesday adopting a so-called feed-in tariff program under which local generators of renewable energy can sign on for 10, 15, or 20 years to sell 100% of the power they generate to the city at rates calculated to equal the cost of obtaining that electricity elsewhere. Glendale was required by law to establish a tariff program by July 1. The state-wide program was mandated by California State Senate Bill 1122 in 2008 as a means of helping California utilities meet the state's renewable energy requirements.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 9, 2012
Once ahead of the game, Glendale has turned its focus from future gains in renewable energy to meeting more short-term state deadlines that it may, in the end, just eke through. All California public utilities must get 20% of their energy from renewable sources by 2013, and then 33% by 2020. As of 2011, Glendale Water & Power was well on its way to meeting the benchmarks, logging a 24% renewable rate at one point. In fact, it was doing so well that it decided to sell some of its renewable energy credits to Pasadena for $5.5 million.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 26, 2011
The City Council has reluctantly agreed to spend $470,000 on consultants to study rehabilitating an aging part of the Grayson Power Plant - a project that the city may ultimately be unable to afford. Earlier this month, the council voted 4-1, with Councilman Ara Najarian dissenting, to hire four consultants to study the feasibility of repowering part of the power plant where the city burns its landfill gas. The Grayson Power Plant has three boiler units that are inefficient and increasingly expensive to maintain, according to a city report.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 9, 2011
Glendale is well on its way to meeting state mandates that require cities to get 33% of their energy supplies from renewable resources such as wind, solar or landfill gas by 2020. The state law, which takes effect Saturday, sets intermediary targets - the first of which Glendale Water & Power has already beat. Officials say the utility currently has a renewable energy portfolio of 21%, above the first intermediary target of 20% by Dec. 31, 2013. The second target is 25% from renewable energy sources by Dec. 31, 2016.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine brittany.levine@latimes.com | November 4, 2011
Forced by the state to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, Glendale's City Council approved a sweeping plan this week to reduce the city's carbon footprint. The plan sets ambitious goals in citywide recycling efforts. It also calls for increased efficiency at city facilities to cut down on local emissions of greenhouse gases. The 115-page Greener Glendale Plan focuses on municipal operations, which account for about 3% of Glendale's total greenhouse gas emissions. But a second plan aimed at the community as a whole is in the pipeline.
NEWS
By Maria Hsin, maria.hsin@latimes.com | October 2, 2011
For all the tens of millions of dollars being spent in Burbank and Glendale for new smart-meter grids, the added efficiencies won't directly affect state mandates for renewable energy, officials say. In Glendale, the tab for new smart meters - which provide customers with real-time tracking for energy use - is $70 million. In Burbank, that cost will be roughly $60 million. The two cities found themselves at the forefront of the national movement when they received a $20-million federal grant to help fund the massive infrastructure projects.
NEWS
By Mark Kellam and Brittany Levine mark.kellam@latimes.com, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 2, 2011
It's a tale of two cities in two very different positions as the utilities in Burbank and Glendale work to meet strict state mandates for using renewable energy. At 21%, Glendale Water & Power is ahead of schedule in hitting the first benchmark - that public utilities must get 20% of their power from renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar and geothermal, by Dec. 31, 2013. Steve Lins, assistant general manager of supplies, told the Glendale City Council on Tuesday that the utility was “well on track.” “We're way ahead of the game,” he said.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
A bill by Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Silver Lake) would take the power of the road for renewable energy. The bill, one of many the Gov. Jerry Brown is wading through in the wake of the legislative recess, would require the California Energy Commission to explore the possibility of generating green electricity from passing cars, trucks and trains. The legislation centers on what's called piezoelectric technology, where censors are placed under a roadway and the vibrations produced by vehicles are converted into electricity.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | December 25, 2009
Michael Peevey, president of the California Public Utilities Commission and husband of state Sen. Carol Liu (D-La Cañada Flintridge), was reappointed to his post last week for another six-year term. The appointment came a week after the state Senate refused to hold a hearing to reappoint Peevey’s fellow commissioner, Rachelle Chong, who had come under fire from consumer groups for her efforts to deregulate phone services. Opponents of the proposal argued it could be detrimental to low-income residents.
NEWS
October 16, 2009
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed hundreds of bills into law at the start of the week, including several from area lawmakers on issues ranging from funding for domestic violence shelters to awards for fallen civil servants. He also vetoed more than 200 bills, including an effort to create a new mandate for renewable energy production within the state, sponsored by Assemblyman Paul Krekorian (D-Los Angeles). The state’s Air Resources Board will make its own renewable energy regulations instead, with the aim of meeting the goal of generating 33% of the state’s power from green resources.
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