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NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | May 15, 2007
Alberto Carranza pointed to the graph he made on spreadsheet indicating the population of rainbow trout dating from 1950 to 2005. Alberto's graph showed a sharp decline of the trout species in the 1970s. "The trout is being fished so much that the population is decreasing," the 17-year-old said. Alberto and other biology students at Clark Magnet High School did research projects on commercial fisheries and used graphs to show the increase or decrease of edible fish species.
NEWS
October 15, 2004
Stem cell research generates more misinformation than any other single issue in the current public debate. The debate is usually cast in terms of being pro- or anti-science and progress. The truth is you can be concerned about the direction of some of the research and still promote scientific progress. The major source of confusion is that there are two distinctly different types of stem cell research. The first -- human somatic stem cell research (SSC)
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 18, 2011
The costs keep piling up as a project to study chromium 6 removal becomes a bigger expense than expected for Glendale, which has been trudging through nine years of research to strip the cancer-causing contaminant from groundwater. Although the City Council on Tuesday approved spending another $400,000 to continue research at two testing facilities - just two months after they gave the green light to spend $550,000 in grant and state funding on more research - some city officials are getting antsy.
LOCAL
By Charly Shelton | June 16, 2006
Last week the Crescenta Valley High School Science Research class had its second annual poster session in the library of the school. Throughout the year, students have been volunteering at various research labs working one-on-one with professionals in their chosen field of study. The students covered research projects from the transmission of AIDS from infected mothers' breast milk to their babies to the discovery of Ice Age fossils at the La Brea Tar Pits. This is the second year the class has been offered to advanced placement students.
NEWS
May 24, 2004
Lucy Abramyan spent her senior year -- 459 hours of it, to be exact -- coming up with one conclusion: The federal government should spend more money on space travel. On Saturday, Lucy and about 210 other Clark Magnet High School seniors presented their senior projects during the school's Oral Boards Day event. "I learned so much, by taking [Glendale Community College] classes, going to military bases, volunteering and doing research," said Lucy, 17. "I think we need more federal money for space travel because one day, the sun will cool down and we have to find alternative ways to survive."
FEATURES
June 21, 2008
The nation’s Catholic bishops followed through on their desire to put forward an initial statement opposing embryonic stem cell research. They voted almost unanimously — 191 to 1 — to approve the statement at their annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. The seven-page policy statement from the Committee on Pro-Life Activities calls embryonic stem cell research “a gravely immoral act” that crosses a “fundamental moral line” by treating human beings as mere objects of research.
FEATURES
By Susan Stefun | February 20, 2009
Rosemont Middle School Principal Michele Doll has a new name plate on her office door. It now reads “Dr. M. Doll.” School faculty and staff congratulated Dr. Doll with cake, coffee and a little bubbly (non-alcoholic, of course) early Thursday morning, Feb. 12 on earning her doctorate from USC. The school lounge sported maroon and gold in honor of Doll’s alma mater. Doll, 37, is married with two daughters – Taney, almost 8, and Kade, 5 – and has been working on her doctorate for three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006
What does it take for students to succeed in today's tough academic world of high stakes testing and increased competition to get into the best colleges? The answer can be found in Ron Dietel's new book "Get Smart! Nine Sure Ways to Help Your Child Succeed in School." On Saturday, Sept. 9, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Ron Dietel will be signing "Get Smart!" at La Cañada Books and Toys, 653 Foothill Boulevard in La Cañada. Ten percent of all net sales of "Get Smart!" will be donated to the La Cañada High School PTSA.
NEWS
By: | October 9, 2005
The three daughters didn't see it coming, nor did the entire family. But when it happened, their whole lives changed forever. When Ann Dobbie died on Christmas Day, 1999, of ovarian cancer, Kim Beaudette, Cathy Greinke and Lori Hunter vowed that this shouldn't happen to other families, if possible. And in January 2000, the Queen of Hearts Foundation was born, the brainchild of the three sisters, all daughters of Ann Dobbie. The objective of the foundation is to support a current research project directly focused on factors thought to be associated with the early detection of ovarian cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2007
Mary Spalding and I strolled into a meeting room at the La Cañada Library. I assumed she was a member of the genealogy group whose monthly meeting would start in a few minutes. Perhaps she thought the same of me, but when we introduced ourselves, we discovered that we were both first-time visitors. Although Mary might be new to the group, she is no stranger to the study of genealogy. She began to research about it more than 35 years ago. Her father's side is French-Canadian. Mary said it was not difficult to trace her line in Canada because those records are easy to search.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 3, 2014
For eight days last month, Crescenta Valley High teacher Christina Engen took night hikes in a Costa Rica jungle, observing leatherback sea turtles that were laying eggs along the coastline of the Pacuare Nature Reserve. Through Ecology Project International, the science teacher was one of two instructors from California to join more than a dozen other teachers from across the country who received fellowships to learn about Costa Rica's diverse ecology. While at the nature reserve, she worked alongside 18 researchers to track over 6-foot-long leatherback sea turtles as they came to shore to lay their eggs.
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NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | February 12, 2014
While browsing in an antique shop in Oregon last summer, a tiny, glass bottle filled with grains of rice caught my eye. I picked it up and read the label. “The daily ration for 750 children in 1 Near East [Armenian] Relief Orphanage is 40 pounds of rice, less than 7/8 ounce per child. For lack of this small amount, they are turning children away by the thousands. Will you help?" The label included the names of Samuel C. Lancaster as state chairman and J.J. Handsaker as director and included an address of 606 Stock Exchange Bldg., Portland, Ore. There was no date or any other information.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 5, 2014
The budget for Glendale's long-running research into a cancer-causing contaminant found in the city's groundwater is set to jump to roughly $11 million as the City Council this week approved another $1.1 million in grant funding. But after more than 13 years of research and numerous City Hall meetings requesting council approval for more funding for the chromium 6 research - the majority of which has been paid for by grants from the state and other water agencies - city officials said this would be the last time they'd ask to increase the program's budget.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | June 11, 2013
An allotment of Armenian books and cultural artifacts linked to the country's history and diaspora following the 1915 genocide will debut at UCLA in the first permanent research program of its kind at any major American university dedicated to Armenian archaeology and ethnography. The collection was given to UCLA with a $2-million gift from Zaruhy Sara Chitjian to establish a research program that will serve as a major resource for scholars around the world on Armenia's cultural heritage, stakeholders announced this week.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 2, 2012
After more than a decade and nearly $9 million, Glendale is nearing the end of its research into the water contaminant chromium 6. After the City Council this week approved using $536,000 to put the final touches on the research project, officials said it would be the last time they would be dealing with the money side of what has morphed into a national research effort for the most effective - and financially prudent - method for stripping the...
THE818NOW
October 15, 2012
More than 900 people took part in the American Cancer Society's 9th annual Relay for Life at the Scholl Canyon baseball fields in Glendale this weekend, helping to raise $85,000 for cancer research. At least one member of each team remained in the relay, which occurred from 10 a.m. Saturday through 10 a.m. Sunday. The walk began with a “Survivor's Lap,” in which dozens of cancer survivors rounded the first lap to cheers. “We're honoring them as well as remembering people who have been lost,” said event organizer Briana Maldonado.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | March 12, 2012
A Glendale Community College faculty member who specializes in English-as-a-second-language instruction has been named a Fulbright Scholar, a prestigious appointment reserved for the brightest minds in American academia. Deborah Robiglio, who teaches English to non-native speakers at the college's Garfield campus, will travel to Santiago, Chile in spring 2013 where she will work as a teacher trainer and researcher at a major university for one semester. “It is a mental exercise as much as it is a physical one,” Robiglio said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 18, 2011
The costs keep piling up as a project to study chromium 6 removal becomes a bigger expense than expected for Glendale, which has been trudging through nine years of research to strip the cancer-causing contaminant from groundwater. Although the City Council on Tuesday approved spending another $400,000 to continue research at two testing facilities - just two months after they gave the green light to spend $550,000 in grant and state funding on more research - some city officials are getting antsy.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | March 18, 2011
Reece LoCicero, the 5-year-old La Crescenta Elementary School kindergarten student suffering from an undiagnosed illness, has been accepted into an elite research program at the National Institutes of Health, officials confirmed Friday. The child and his immediate family members will travel to the center’s Undiagnosed Disease Program in Bethesda, Md. where they will undergo a battery of tests, examinations and consultations in an effort to diagnosis his symptoms, said Dr. Cyndi Tifft, director of the pediatric portion of the program.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | December 28, 2010
Poverty, broken families and rough neighborhoods litter the paths of Dr. Emil Bogenmann's students, making higher education seem like a hazy dream. But five years after launching the Latino & African-American High School Program, or LA-HIP — a rigorous science research immersion program for low-income students at Children's Hospital Los Angeles — Bogenmann is helping to bring their academic aspirations into sharper focus. While dropout rates within the Los Angeles Unified School District, from which LA-HIP participants are drawn, hover around 50%, Bogenmann has never lost a student.
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