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Road Diet

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NEWS
July 13, 2012
I ask that the City Council not give up on the Honolulu Avenue road diet project. My wife and I and our 2 1/2-year-old son moved into the La Crescenta/Montrose area this past November. Our house is off of Ramsdell Avenue, just a few short blocks up from Honolulu and the proposed road diet. Since the signs went up and the information letters went out we've been quietly anticipating the road improvements. The idea that we soon could be able to safely ride our bikes down to Trader Joe's to get our groceries, and over to the farmers market for fresh produce, made us feel like we really made the right decision to call La Crescenta home.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
As a Montrose resident, I would like to express my support for the Honolulu Avenue Redesign (road diet) Test project. I believe that this project will significantly improve the safety of our neighborhood and make our streets more enjoyable for everyone. The Honolulu Avenue Redesign is merely an extension of the wonderful traffic improvements in the Montrose Shopping Park. Anyone who has ever visited the park will agree that it is a wonderful place to spend your time with your family.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
I read with much interest the letter from William Brown on Feb. 10 titled “ 'Road diet' plan a recipe for disaster ” and wish to comment regarding the proposed “road diet” through Montrose. I, too, agree that this ill-conceived plan is a disaster looking for a happening. Many of us local residents use Honolulu Avenue on a daily basis for our east-west commute. There are no alternate routes, other than Foothill Boulevard, which is teeming with commuters, kids and local shoppers.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
Road diet: The only thing that is more absurd than the concept or the cost is the name. Only after bicyclists have paid hefty license and road taxes for decades should there be a discussion about removing vehicle lanes and adding designated bike lanes. And then the first item on the agenda should be how the biking public will reimburse the driving public for all the nice roads built and maintained by fuel taxes. Some $125,000 for an experimental road diet? Federal bicycle improvement funding seems to be Glendale's miniature version of California's Central Valley bullet train.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
The community interaction over the so-called road diet has been enlightening and speaks directly to one of our founding principles. The freedom to speak and to exchange ideas is fundamental to this democratic republic, and in so many ways, it is a principle that is becoming marginalized. I thought I would comment on the most recent road diet in our neighborhood. Dunsmore School has been a fabric of this community for more than half a century. Our daughter and son both went to school there, and both later graduated from Crescenta Valley High School and moved on into adult life and have children of their own. In recent days Dunsmore Avenue, near the school and park, has undergone significant change.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
(Re: “Bike lanes losing favor,” June 21). The city of Glendale is crazy to implement these extensive changes without conducting a very simple test emulating the proposed road diet. To move forward without such a simple test is irresponsible. All the city has to do is use some of the surplus concrete barriers from the flood zones and set up a simulated road diet for a week or two. Don't need to paint the bike lanes; just squeeze the traffic down to the proposed two (plus center)
NEWS
June 22, 2012
The beehive of neighborhood opposition appears to have been poked over a planned one-mile “road diet” on Honolulu Avenue that would provide more space for cyclists. Despite little more than a peep when the plan was initially approved, opponents have stepped up their efforts recently to have the project killed, arguing it will mangle traffic in an already congested area. But isn't that the point of the pilot project? Cities don't need to make quiet roadways safer for cyclists.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
Thank you, Councilman Ara Najarian. I was encouraged to read that perhaps one council member is coming to realize that a big part of being a representative of the people is knowing when to “really” listen to those in the community (“Road diet feeds ire,” June 19). We are adults and we love our Montrose. We know what we want to lose and what we will fight to keep. Sometimes, stepping back and taking another look is very important. The people of Glendale are not children and they do not like being treated as such.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
Really, road diet? The bike riders I've encountered are rude, even where there is a bike lane I've seen them ride side by side, blocking vehicle traffic. When a vehicle tries to go around them in the vehicle traffic lane, the riders yell and flip 'the bird' to the driver. How attractive. Also, it is called Montrose Shopping park for a reason. It's for shopping, not bike riding. Just a thought. Taya Allen Glendale
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NEWS
January 8, 2013
The community interaction over the so-called road diet has been enlightening and speaks directly to one of our founding principles. The freedom to speak and to exchange ideas is fundamental to this democratic republic, and in so many ways, it is a principle that is becoming marginalized. I thought I would comment on the most recent road diet in our neighborhood. Dunsmore School has been a fabric of this community for more than half a century. Our daughter and son both went to school there, and both later graduated from Crescenta Valley High School and moved on into adult life and have children of their own. In recent days Dunsmore Avenue, near the school and park, has undergone significant change.
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NEWS
July 18, 2012
Road diet: The only thing that is more absurd than the concept or the cost is the name. Only after bicyclists have paid hefty license and road taxes for decades should there be a discussion about removing vehicle lanes and adding designated bike lanes. And then the first item on the agenda should be how the biking public will reimburse the driving public for all the nice roads built and maintained by fuel taxes. Some $125,000 for an experimental road diet? Federal bicycle improvement funding seems to be Glendale's miniature version of California's Central Valley bullet train.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
I ask that the City Council not give up on the Honolulu Avenue road diet project. My wife and I and our 2 1/2-year-old son moved into the La Crescenta/Montrose area this past November. Our house is off of Ramsdell Avenue, just a few short blocks up from Honolulu and the proposed road diet. Since the signs went up and the information letters went out we've been quietly anticipating the road improvements. The idea that we soon could be able to safely ride our bikes down to Trader Joe's to get our groceries, and over to the farmers market for fresh produce, made us feel like we really made the right decision to call La Crescenta home.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
(Re: “Bike lanes losing favor,” June 21). The city of Glendale is crazy to implement these extensive changes without conducting a very simple test emulating the proposed road diet. To move forward without such a simple test is irresponsible. All the city has to do is use some of the surplus concrete barriers from the flood zones and set up a simulated road diet for a week or two. Don't need to paint the bike lanes; just squeeze the traffic down to the proposed two (plus center)
NEWS
July 10, 2012
The community interaction over the so-called road diet has been enlightening and speaks directly to one of our founding principles. The freedom to speak and to exchange ideas is fundamental to this democratic republic, and in so many ways it is a principle that is becoming marginalized. In keeping with that principle, I thought I would comment on the most recent road diet in our neighborhood. Dunsmore School has been a fabric of this community for more than half a century. Our daughter and son both went to school there, and both later graduated from Crescenta Valley High School and moved on into adult life and have children of their own. During the past week, Dunsmore Avenue, near the school and park, has undergone significant change.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | July 10, 2012
Glendale's first road diet has hit the brakes for now as the City Council on Tuesday backed off of slimming down a one-mile stretch of North Glendale road that was set to gain two designated bike paths later this month. The city has tabled a so-called road diet that would cut one lane in each direction, add a center turn lane and two bike lanes to Honolulu Avenue between Ramsdell and Sunset avenues due to heavy neighborhood opposition. Although bicycle advocates packed recent City Hall meetings in support of the road diet, slews of emails from opponents swayed council members to stop the project.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Plans to reduce a one-mile section of Honolulu Avenue in Montrose by one lane to make dedicated room for bicyclists head to the City Council on Tuesday. Proponents say the so-called “road diet” will make it safer for cyclists, but the plan to temporarily cut one lane in each direction to vehicle traffic has angered some residents. The road diet, which would be between Ramsdell and Sunset avenues to make way for the designated bike paths, was set to begin this summer, but a routine status meeting last month put the project on hold.
NEWS
July 3, 2012
I'm not a bike rider, but I do drive the stretch of Honolulu Avenue in question, and also the stretch of Verdugo Boulevard in Burbank that is already on a road diet. Honestly, I'm not understanding what all the fuss is about. Our city leaders should do what their instincts told them to do months ago when they agreed to move forward on a test plan. If the test works, institute the plan to help calm our roads and open them up to alternative modes of transportation, and spread it far and wide.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
I'm not a bike rider, but I do drive the stretch of Honolulu Avenue in question, and also the stretch of Verdugo Boulevard in Burbank that is already on a road diet. Honestly, I'm not understanding what all the fuss is about. Our city leaders should do what their instincts told them to do months ago when they agreed to move forward on a test plan. If the test works, institute the plan to help calm our roads and open them up to alternative modes of transportation, and spread it far and wide.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
Really, road diet? The bike riders I've encountered are rude, even where there is a bike lane I've seen them ride side by side, blocking vehicle traffic. When a vehicle tries to go around them in the vehicle traffic lane, the riders yell and flip 'the bird' to the driver. How attractive. Also, it is called Montrose Shopping park for a reason. It's for shopping, not bike riding. Just a thought. Taya Allen Glendale
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